This Pathway allows students to take an interdisciplinary approach to inquiry of bodies and embodiment, their (her)(his)tories, frameworks, practices and methodologies. We will explore diverse and potentially contradictory definitions, narratives, representations, experiences, histories of body and what and who counts as a body. 

Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between power, subjectivities, and individual and collective bodies. Through their studies, they will be inspired to become engaged citizens in local and global settings. They will become aware of the connections and differences between disciplinary approaches to the study of the body/embodiment and develop a critical analytical lens for examining the promises and limits of particular disciplines.

While students will construct their own animating questions, some possible examples include:

  • Do all bodies work and feel the same?
  • How are bodies affected by power and how do they resist?
  • How are bodies presented and represented (e.g., technologically, scientifically, statistically, visually, narratively, biologically or aesthetically)?
  • What is the relationship among physical, imagined and/or metaphorical bodies?

Core Faculty

Dean Accardi, history

Dean Accardi

Visiting Assistant Professor of History

Dean Accardi is an historian of gender and religion in South Asia and the Islamic World. He is interested in the connections between religious and political practices, institutions and discourses in the early modern and modern world. His research focuses on the gendered ascetic practices of saints revered by both Hindus and Muslims and their use to establish and articulate religious and political power.

Nadav Assor

Nadav Assor

Assistant Professor of Art

Nadav Assor began his work as an assistant professor of art at Connecticut College in August, 2012, leading the development of the new Expanded Media area in the Studio Art department.  Assor's current classes, all cross-listed between studio art and the Ammerman Center for Art and Technology, include Introduction to Digital Concepts in Time Based Media, Video Installation, Sound Art, and Experimental 3D. 

Andrea Baldwin, Gender and Women's Studies

Andrea N. Baldwin

Visiting Assistant Professor in Gender and Women's Studies, Assistant Director of Africana Studies

Andrea N. Baldwin's long-term research involves transnational feminist pedagogies and praxis, theorizing love as power in intimate heterosexual relationships in the Anglophone Caribbean, the migration of Caribbean women as a form of care work, and cyber feminism. 

Ruth Grahn, Associate Professor of Psychology, Director of Behavioral Neuroscience Program

Ruth E. Grahn

Associate Professor of Psychology

As a behavioral neuroscientist, Ruth Grahn's central interest is to investigate the mechanisms by which neural activity mediates behavior. She has taken an approach that is best described as functional neuroanatomy. How does activity in Brain Region X control or modulate Behavior Y?

Afshan Jafar, Assistant Professor of Sociology

Afshan Jafar

Associate Professor of Sociology

Afshan Jafar’s research and teaching interests include globalization, transnational women's movements, fundamentalist and nationalist movements, gender, media, and the body. Professor Jafar regularly teaches, Introduction to Sociology; Sociology of the Body and Embodiment; Sex Gender, and Society; Sociology of Globalization. 

Nina Martin, 2015

Nina K. Martin

Associate Professor of Film Studies

Nina Martin teaches Introduction to Film Study: How to Read a Film and Studies in Authorship: Women Directors, among others.

Michelle Neely, Assistant Professor of English

Michelle Neely

Assistant Professor of English

Michelle C. Neely's research and teaching focus on questions of nature, culture and democracy in American literature before 1900. As an assistant professor at Connecticut College, Neely has built on her environmental, animal studies, and food studies expertise by developing courses for interdisciplinary contexts such as the Environmental Studies Program and the American Studies Program, and by teaching a wide range of courses in American literature before 1900.

Sabrina Notarfrancisco, Associate Professor of Theater

Sabrina Notarfrancisco

Associate Professor of Theater

Sabrina Notarfrancisco is a costume designer for live performance and film. In addition to teaching courses in Costume History and Costume Design and Construction, she works closely with students in the costume studio, a hands-on environment where theory and practice seamlessly intersect.

Denise Pelletier, professor of art

Denise Pelletier

Professor of Art, Co-Chair of the Art Department

Denise Pelletier has a wide range of expertise in ceramic sculpture/handbuilding, moldmaking, slipcasting and industrial production methods, and a decade of experience in making vessels and functional pottery. She is experienced with majolika, underglazes, china paints, reduction and oxidation high-fire glazes, silkscreen and digital decals, traditional and experimental image transfer techniques, paper clay, plaster clay, casting slip and adobe.

Kenneth Prestininzi, associate professor of theater, Connecticut College

Kenneth Prestininzi

Associate Professor of Theater

Kenneth Prestininzi is a playwright, director, dramaturg, teacher and producer. Prior to coming to Connecticut College, he was the Chair (acting) and Associate Chair of Playwriting at the Yale School of Drama and a Pembroke Fellow at Brown University.

Rosemarie Roberts, Associate Professor of Dance

Rosemarie Roberts

Associate Professor of Dance

Rosemarie A. Roberts is a dance studies scholar, dancer and educator. Her artistic and scholarly work blend history, dance and theater in order to conduct social psychological and anthropological investigations of Afro-diasporic dance as embodiments of difference, knowledge and resistive power. Professor Roberts is an interpreter of traditional and folkloric Cuban, Haitian, Puerto Rican and Brazilian dance forms. In the Katherine Dunham tradition, dance is a forum for investigating the historical, cultural and spiritual richness of these forms.

Ariella Rotramel, Vandana Shiva Assistant Professor of Gender and Women's Studies

Ariella R. Rotramel

Vandana Shiva Assistant Professor of Gender and Women's Studies

Rotramel's research and teaching agenda reflect her interdisciplinary training and commitment to bridging theoretical and practical engagements of identity and social justice issues. Professor Rotramel has taught Feminist Approaches to Disability Studies, Transnational Women's Movements and Public Policy and Social Ethics, Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies, Introduction to Queer Studies and Feminist Theory. 

Jennifer Rudolph, Assistant Professor of Hispanic Studies

Jennifer L. Rudolph

Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies, Interim Chair of the Hispanic Studies Department 2017-2018

Jennifer Rudolph teaches Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition.

Lina Perkins Wilder, Associate Professor of English, Department of Literatures in English

Lina Perkins Wilder

Associate Professor of English

Lina Perkins Wilder teaches courses in Shakespeare and Renaissance Literature. Her courses include Essentials of Literary Study; Happy Endings: Shakespeare’s Comedies; Speaking What We Feel: Shakespeare’s Tragedies and Histories; Archive Fever; Pain and Violence in Renaissance Drama; Jews and Moors in Renaissance Drama; Milton; Donne, Herbert, Marvell; Shakespeare in Performance; Sickness and Health in Renaissance Literature; and English Shakespeare’s Brain, Shakespeare’s Body.

Thematic Inquiry

The Thematic Inquiry will be co-taught by the coordinators of the Pathway. Other faculty members will circulate throughout the semester to teach their discipline’s frameworks, practices and methodologies. Sample topics include self-care practices, food, capitalism’s framing of bodies, perfectionism, individualism, globalization and cultural appropriation.

Throughout the semester, students will reflect on their embodied social locations using their medium of choice. These reflections will culminate in an analysis of course themes and content. Students will also contribute to a course blog in which they reflect and analyze based on evidence from course content, generate unanswered questions, and forge connections to life, assignments, and content in other courses.

 

Curricular Itinerary

All students in the Pathway will complete at least three Curricular Itinerary courses, based on their specific interests and animating questions. The following courses have been approved in advance by the core faculty of the Pathway. Students may also petition to have additional courses counted toward the Curricular Itinerary, as appropriate.

Mode A: Creative Expression
ART 101 CONCEPTS IN TWO DIMENSIONS
ART 102 CONCEPTS IN THREE DIMENSIONS
ART 104 CC:TIME-BASED DIGITAL ART
DAN 107 EXP WRKSHP:INTRO TO IMPROVSTN
DAN 110 TECH PRODUCTION:DANCE/THEATER
DAN 114 HIP HOP DANCE
DAN 119 PERFORMING HIP HOP CULTURE
DAN 151 INTRO TO DANCE:MOVERS &SHAKERS
DAN 162 WEST AFRICAN DANCE
MUS 104 THE LANGUAGE OF MUSIC
MUS 122 MAKING MUSIC AT KEYBOARD
DAN 165 AFRO-CARIBBEAN DANCE I
THE 104 ACTING I: PREPARATION
THE 247 COSTUME DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTN
THE 316 THE SOLO PERFORMANCE EVENT

Mode B: Critical Interpretation and Analysis
CLA 215 FACING DEATH IN ANCIENT GREECE
CLA 376 BEAUTY STAND STILL HERE
DAN 119 PERFORMING HIP HOP CULTURE
DAN 145 HISTORY OF DANCE
EAS 106 CC: SUPERHEROES & UNDERDOGS
ENG 128 FOOD: WRITING AND READING
ENG 164 SHAKESPEARE'S COMEDIES
ENG 165 SHAKESPEARE'S TRAGEDI/HISTORI
ENG 264 SHAKESPEARE'S COMEDIES
ENG 265 SHAKESPEARE'S TRAGEDI/HISTORI
HIS 427 THE CHINESE BODY
PHI 224 BIOLOGICAL THEOR OF THE MIND
PHI 229 BIOETHICS
PHI 258 LOVE, DEATH, AND DESIRE
PHI 263 BODY AND GENDER
PHI 276 PHILOSOPHY OF RACE AND RACISM
SLA 230 GEND COMMUNST/POST-COMM SOC
THE 199 CC:THEATR OF THE AIDS EPIDEMIC
THE 266 MUSICAL THEATER IN AMER CUL
THE 297 COSTUME HISTORY
THE 399 THEATER OF THE AIDS EPIDEMIC

Mode C: Quantitative and Formal Reasoning
COM 103 CC: INTRODUCTORY INFORMATICS
LIN 201 PHONOLOGY

Mode D: Scientific Inquiry and Analysis
BIO 115 CC:HUMAN MICRO: USER MANUAL
BIO 118 CC: UNDERSTANDING EVOLUTION
BIO 208 GENETICS
BOT 115 CC: HOW PLANTS FEED THE WORLD
PHY 107 GENERAL PHYSICS
PHY 109 ADVANCED GENERAL PHYSICS I
PSY 100 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

Mode E: Social and Historical Inquiry
AHI 356 IMAGIN OTHERNESS VISUAL CULTR
AHI 360 RADICAL BODIES:CONTEMP ART/ACT
ANT 320 ANTHRO OF SEXUALITY & GENDER
BOT 117 CC:COEVOLUTION PLANTS & PEOPLE
DAN 145 HISTORY OF DANCE
EAS 106 CC: SUPERHEROES & UNDERDOGS
GOV 307 THE POLITICS OF REFUGEES
GOV 323 HUMAN RIGHTS AND MEDIA
GOV 324 HUMAN RIGHTS IN WORLD POL
GOV 493Q WOMEN AND WORLD POLITICS


Mode E: Social and Historical Inquiry (continued)
GWS 207 BODY NARRATIVES, TECH, & MEDIA
HIS 220 GENDER IN THE ANDES AND MEXICO
HIS 258 SEX AND THE STATE
HIS 274 SECULARISM IN GLOBAL CONTEXTS
HIS 279 GENDER/SEXLTY IN COLONIAL WORLD
HIS 330 HIST OF THE AMERICAN SOUTH
HIS 427 THE CHINESE BODY
HMD 307 ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT
PHI 229 BIOETHICS
PHI 258 LOVE, DEATH, AND DESIRE
PHI 263 BODY AND GENDER
PHI 276 PHILOSOPHY OF RACE AND RACISM
SLA 230 GEND COMMUNST/POST-COMM SOC
SRS 299D SECRECY:POWER,PRIVIL,INVISIBLE

Courses Not Currently Designated with a Mode of Inquiry
AHI 281 CURRENT ISSUES MUSEUM STUDIES
AHI 286 MUSEUM THEATER
AHI 420 GENDER IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE
ART 213 SOUND ART
ART 214 VIDEO INSTALLATION
ART 215 3D:SCAN/MODEL/ANIMATE/PRINT
ART 222B FIGURATIVE PAINTING & ITS POL
BIO 201 HUMAN ANATOMY
BIO 202 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY
ENG 129 MODERN MEDIA CULTURE
ENG 303A PAIN/VIOLENCE RENAISS DRAMA
ENG 313 POSTCOLONIAL THEORY TODAY
ENG 331 SHAKESPEARE IN PERFORMANCE
ENG 336 HUMANS/OTH ANIMALS 19 C AM LIT
ENG 350 SICKNESS/HEALTH IN REN LIT
ENG 356 RADCL DIETS:FOOD/DRINK AM LIT
FLM 311 REPRESENTING GENDER
FLM 395W FEMINISMS IN AMER POP CULT
FRH 314 FORBIDDEN SEX IN AFR & CARIBB
FYS 1XXXX EMBODIED RESISTANCE
GWS 354 BLACK FEMINISMS
HIS 309 HIST OF SLAVERY/EMANC IN AMER
PSY 203 PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN
PSY 214 BIOPSYCHOLOGY
PSY 215 SENSATION AND PERCEPTION
PSY 314 BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
PSY 322 PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY
PSY 336 NEUROBIOLOGY OF DISEASE
PSY 409 BEHAVIORAL ENDOCRINOLOGY
PSY 493A PSYCHOLOGY WOMEN'S HEALTH
SOC 208 RACE/GENDER AND THE MASS MEDIA
SOC 212 SEX, GENDER AND SOCIETY
SOC 223 ETHNIC AND RACE RELATIONS
SOC 293 SOCIOLOGY OF INEQUALITY
SOC 320 SOC OF CHILDHOOD/ADOLESCENCE
SOC 324 GENDER, CULTURE, AND THE BODY
SOC 400 THE SOCIOLOGY OF GLOBALIZATION
SOC 419 PUNISHMENT AND SOCIETY
SRS 299E VISIONING THE (IN)VISIBLE
THE 206 ACTING II: PLAY ANALYSIS
THE 241 THEATER AND CULTURE I
THE 341 THEATER AND CULTURE II

Global-Local Engagement (Some Potential Settings and Activities)

Study Away

Through study away, students in this Pathway can engage critically with the status and representations of different bodies in non-academic settings; learn to understand their own bodies and the spaces they occupy in relational ways, rather than in isolation; respond effectively and ethically to situations of embodied inequality; and deploy intersectional methodologies from the Thematic Inquiry to contribute to new knowledge formations and to envision change. Some examples include immersive study away programs in Amsterdam and Morocco, dance programs in Paris and community health programs in South Africa.

Internships

Students should be engaged in the doing and application of frameworks, concepts, practices and methodologies learned through the Pathway. Possiblities include, but are not limited to:

  • Sprout Garden
  • York Correctional Institution and Corrigan-Radgowski Correctional Center
  • Pequot Museum
  • Garde Arts Center
  • Writer’s Block
  • Lawrence and Memorial Hospital
  • Eugene O’Neill Theater
  • Customs House
  • Denison Pequotsepos Nature Center
  • Fresh New London
  • Coast Guard Academy
  • Connecticut College Children’s Program
  • Beechwood Rehabilitation and Nursing Center
  • SCAAD in New London
  • Sound Communities
  • Regional Multicultural Magnet School
  • Arts Magnet School
  • New London Library
  • Hygienic Arts Center
  • El Centro de la Comunidad
  • Hispanic Alliance
  • Hearing Youth Voices
  • Mystic Seaport
  • Mystic Aquarium
  • Safe Futures
Community-Based Learning

Particularly relevant to this Pathway would be community-based learning opportunities that foster collaborative action in the local ecosystem. Examples of community-based learning about the body and embodiment include volunteering with local governance machinery, non-governmental organizations, arts and media networks, environmental centers, health and wellness facilities and multilingual and multicultural associations, some of which are identified above. The Pathway envisions community integration that will work toward improving the world in some meaningful way.

Senior Reflection

The senior reflection will be a two-credit seminar that will meet weekly and be taught by one instructor. It will include flexible assignments leading toward the All-College Symposium that interact with animating questions: e.g., revisit animating questions and responses from Thematic Inquiry course; consider how they have changed direction and why; choose one reading/review/clip for the group that motivates their project/direction; reflect on Modes of Inquiry; consider different formats for symposium; have a scaffolded series of goals toward All-College Symposium; conduct dry runs/rehearsals for presentations; and reflect on the Pathway and its relationship to majors, Study Away, Global/Local engagement, internships and/or language and culture. The seminar will also include post-symposium reflection and assessment.