At its core, entrepreneurship is about creating value by inventing things to address necessities. In this way, it is about designing something for a target group (market). But entrepreneurial intervention is fundamentally about people—who’s doing the entrepreneurship and to whom it is being done. Entrepreneurship offers students intangible growth in learning how to empathize with others, including those from very different backgrounds, to address a social issue in a flexible, adaptable and context-relevant way.

Students in this Pathway will gain an understanding of entrepreneurial theory as it applies across multiple fields of inquiry, emphasizing connections to creativity and innovation. They will gain a familiarity with past and present applications of entrepreneurial theory and develop entrepreneurial problem-solving skills that enable them to identify a problem or need, articulate a model for addressing this concern, and generate an ongoing sustainable solution. Students will also locate their problem-solving skills in the context of the communities in which they live and weigh the value of their efforts with regard to ethics and sustainability.

Core Faculty

Gregory Bailey, Associate Professor of Art

Gregory A. Bailey

Associate Professor of Art, Co-Chair of the Art Department

As an artist, Greg Bailey makes work that functions for him as his most direct and honest response possible to the world around him. Bailey’s use of metaphor relates his work both personally and universally. He uses a range of technical, conceptual, and expressive aspects in his work. His work combines narratives and contemporary theory; it engages in political, social and cultural awareness and commentary, utilizing elements of wit, humor, irony, and visual aesthetic.

cheryl banker

Cheryl Banker

SENIOR ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR of the Office of Career and Professional Development/ PRE-LAW and pre-business ADVISER

Cheryl obtained her bachelor of arts in history from Connecticut College and has been in career services since 1994. In addition to experience in employer relations and program development and management, Cheryl acts as the pre-law and pre-business adviser, liaison to the Toor Cummings Center for International Studies and the Liberal Arts (CISLA), and oversees the CamelLink development and management. 

Christine Chung, Jean C. Tempel Associate Professor of Computer Science

Christine Chung

Jean C. Tempel '65 Associate Professor of Computer Science

Christine Chung teaches Introduction to Computer Science and Problem Solving, Topics in Algorithmic Game Theory, Algorithm Design and Analysis, Data Structures and Research Seminar.

Sangyoon James Lee, Assistant Professor of Computer Science

S. James Lee

Jean C. Tempel '65 Assistant Professor of Computer Science

S. James Lee's research interests are concentrated on computer graphics and visualization for interactive applications such as computer games, virtual reality environments, autonomous interactive characters, and museum installations.

Noel Garrett

Noel Garrett

DEAN OF ACADEMIC SUPPORT AND DIRECTOR OF THE ACADEMIC RESOURCE CENTER

Noel serves as both the Dean of Academic Support and the Director of the Academic Resource Center. As dean, he oversees the Academic Resource Center, writing center, student accessibility services, and the career office. Noel serves as a liaison between the Dean of the College and faculty regarding areas that have to do with student academic success. Earning his doctorate in clinical, cognitive, social, and developmental psychology, Noel brings a wealth of knowledge and experience, having previously worked as class dean at Wesleyan University.

Yongjin Park, Associate Professor of Economics

Yong Jin Park

Associate Professor of Economics, Chair of the Economics Department

Yongjin Park's short-term research interest is to understand and explain the social inequalities, especially income inequality and disadvantages of the poor, in a credit market. Park teaches the following: Core courses: Financial Markets and Institutions, Econometrics I; upper-level courses: Corporate Finance, Economics of Conflict and Cooperation Seminar.

James Dale Wilson, Associate Professor of Music, Ethnomusicologist, Jazz Composer/Arranger

James Dale Wilson

Associate Professor of Music, Co-Chair of the Music Department

Dale Wilson has composed and arranged music for a variety of media, including string orchestra, big band, wind ensemble, jazz chorus, Chinese instrumental ensemble, and pop ensembles. As an ethnomusicologist, Wilson’s principal areas of research are: Guangdong ritual and ritual music; the interpenetration of opera and ritual; and Southeast Chinese perspectives on migration and transnationalism.

Andrea Wollensak, Professor of Art, Judith Ammerman '60 Director, Ammerman Center for Arts & Technology, Connecticut College

Andrea Wollensak

Professor of Art, Judith Ammerman '60 Director, Ammerman Center for Arts and Technology

In her work, Andrea Wollensak combines new media technology and traditional design and fabrication to explore the convergence of place, identity, and history through site-based artwork. Specific themes in her work include community, environment, surveillance and memory, which she adapts to a range of artistic forms including audio/video and interactive installations, data visualization and 3-D printed forms.

Thematic Inquiry

The Thematic Inquiry course will provide the foundation for the Entrepreneurship Pathway. Students will explore theory and methods of entrepreneurship, research different business models, hear from alumni speakers and create a personal brand. Students will learn about ideation and the creative process, research and development and financing entrepreneurial ventures, as well as how to present at each point in the process.  

This course will also include a three-hour lab component, facilitated by a guest lecturer or Connecticut College professor with expertise specific to the topic of the lab. For example, alumni startup founders might speak one week about their experiences and challenges and lead a case study.   

 

Curricular Itinerary

All students in the Pathway will complete at least three Curricular Itinerary courses, based on their specific interests and animating questions. The following courses have been approved in advance by the core faculty of the Pathway.  Students may also petition to have additional courses counted toward the Curricular Itinerary, as appropriate.

Mode A: Creative Expression
ART 210 CC: DECODING COLOR
COM 217 ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE DESIGN
DAN 107 EXP WRKSHP:INTRO TO IMPROVSTN<
DAN 119 PERFORMING HIP HOP CULTURE
DAN 222 COMPOSITIONAL IMPROVISATION
FLM 210 FUND MOTION PICTURE PRODUCT
FLM 220 DOCUMENTARY THRY & PRODUCTN
FLM 238 SCREENWRITING
MUS 203 ELECTROACOUSTIC MUSIC I

Mode B: Critical Interpretation and Analysis
AMS 465 GLOBALZTN & AM CUL SINCE 1945
DAN 119 PERFORMING HIP HOP CULTURE
ENG 119 CC: LIT AND EVOLUTION OF MIND
ENG 155 CC: AMERICAN EARTH
FLM 209 INTERSECT IDENT IN AMER FILM
HIS 115 CC: CHINESE PATH TO HAPPINESS
THE 199 CC:THEATR OF THE AIDS EPIDEMIC
THE 399 THEATER OF THE AIDS EPIDEMIC

Mode C: Quantitative and Formal Reasoning
COM 103 INFORMATICS PROGRAMMING
COM 110 INTRO COMPUTER SCI/PROB SOLV
COM 205 TOPICS IN SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT
COM 211 INFORMATICS
COM 212 DATA STRUCTURES
COM 214 WEB TECHNOL & MOBILE COMPUTING
COM 217 ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE DESIGN
MAT 107 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS
MAT 108 MATHEMATICS OF MONEY
MAT 110 CC: NETWORKS & THEIR APPLCTNS
PHI 103 LOGIC
PSY 201 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS

Mode D: Scientific Inquiry and Analysis
AST 105 SOLAR SYSTEM ASTRONOMY
CHM 100 CC: CHEMISTRY IN CONTEXT
MUS 106 MUSICAL ACOUSTICS
PSY 202 RESEARCH METH IN PSYCHOLOGY

Mode E: Social and Historical Inquiry
AHI 103 CC: BUILDING CULTURE
AHI 105 CC: MONA LISA TO INSTAGRAM
AMS 465 GLOBALZTN & AM CUL SINCE 1945
ANT 114 CC: POWER AND INEQUALITY
ECO 112 INTRODUCTORY MICROECONOMICS

Mode E: Social and Historical Inquiry (continued)
ECO 115 CC: INCENTIVES AND SOCIETY
ECO 219 WAGES, INCOME, AND INEQUALITY
ECO 227 ECONOMICS AND MORALITY
ECO 237 ECON GROWTH/DEVEL IN LAT AMER
ECO 240 HEALTH ECONOMICS
ECO 248 INTRO FINANC INSTIT & MARKETS
ECO 250 ECONOMIC JUSTICE
FLM 220 DOCUMENTARY THRY & PRODUCTN
GOV 220 THE EUROPEAN UNION
GOV 260 PROB ENVIRON POLICY & LAW
GOV 493E EMERGING MARKET ECON: BRICS
HIS 428 DEBATING CHINA'S GLOBALIZATION
HIS 450 LATIN AMERICAN IMMIGRATION
MUS 108 MUSIC OF THE WORLD

Courses Not Currently Designated with a Mode of Inquiry
ACC 102 ACCOUNTING II
AHI 450 BAD ART: LOOKING BEYOND CANON
ARC 327 EVIDENCE-BASED DESIGN:INTRDISC
ART 222A SHELTER AND COMFORT
AT 201 HIST OF ARTS & TECHNOLOGY
CA 201 PUBLIC POLICY/SOCIAL ETHICS
CRE 166 CC:#BLACK LIVES MATTER
DAN 208 ELEMENTARY CHOREOGRAPHY
EAS 451 CONTEMPORARY CHINESE ART
ECO 212 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
ECO 255 INTRO TO BEHAVIORAL FINANCE
EDU 270 TEACH/LEARN FOR SOCIAL CHANGE
ES 321 VISUALIZING THE CITY
FYS 1XXX EMBODIED RESISTANCE
HIS 476 THE GLOBAL 1960S
PHE 130 THEORY OF COACHING
PHI 440G HAPPINESS
PHY 213 ELECTRONICS FOR SCIENTISTS
PSY 214 BIOPSYCHOLOGY
SOC 102 APPROACHES TO SOCIAL PROBLEMS
SOC 208 RACE/GENDER AND THE MASS MEDIA
SOC 209 SOCIOLOGY OF SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
SOC 211 RACE, CLASS, GENDER & SEXUALITY
SOC 215 DRUGS AND SOCIETY
SOC 216 SOCIETY IN AGE OF CLIMATE CHNG
SOC 224 URBAN SOCIOLOGY
SPA 230 BUSINESS SPANISH
SUS 293 APPLICATIONS OF SUSTAINABILITY
THE 226 DIRECTING I: COACHING THE ACTOR

Global-Local Engagement (Some Potential Settings and Activities)

Study Away

Options include School for International Training programs, a SATA program in the developing world, or an immersive experience in different types of economies.

Internships

Students may complete internships related to their questions, especially those in venture capital and start-ups, small theater/ dance companies, small art galleries, maker spaces, etc.

Community-Based Learning

Opportunities include shadowing different businesses in downtown New London and the surrounding area, such as Hygienic Arts, Spark Makerspace, finance firms, New London Landmarks, Social Services, local economic development, New London Main Street, boutique shops, microbreweries, wineries, and other small businesses and non-profit organizations.

Senior Reflection

The senior reflection will consist of student-led forums, with faculty oversight. Students will take turns teaching what they learned in their Pathway experience. Preparing their presentations for the All-College Symposium, students will reflect on their projects and receive constructive feedback from their peers.