The Global Capitalism Integrative Pathway will cultivate critical thinking on the topic of capitalism as a social, economic, and cultural form. Students will explore the historical origins and dynamics, social structures, lived experiences of, challenges to, and power of capitalism in a broad range of global and local contexts and across multiple media. The Pathway provides opportunities for students to explore the ways in which capitalism influences cultural representations and contestations, political institutions and movements, social inclusions and exclusions, technological and scientific advancements, and the dynamics of production, commerce and exchange. Themes include the environment, sustainability, the production and consumption of knowledge, dispossession, ecology, gender, identity, imperialism, labor, migration, representation, race, and social movements.

While students will construct their own animating questions, some possible examples might be:

  • How do various forms of knowledge and ways of knowing (artistic, scientific, humanistic, and technological) represent, sustain, or critique global capitalism?
  • How does global capitalism provide the conditions by which various forms of knowledge and ways of knowing (artistic, scientific, humanistic, and technological) come to be?
  • How do peoples within capitalist societies, at the local and global level, endeavor to reform capitalism, either to propose sustainable solutions to the problems generated by capitalist production, or to make capitalism operate more equitably or more productively
  • What is the impact of capitalism on the distribution of wealth and the dynamics of poverty and inequality, and how does this map on to the world in dynamic ways?

Core Faculty

Sheetal Chhabria, assistant professor of history, Connecticut College

Sheetal Chhabria

Jacob and Hilda Blaustein Assistant Professor of History

Sheetal Chhabria is a historian of South Asia with interests in the problems of inequality in social and cultural life. Her research focuses on the intensification and alleviation of urban poverty in cities like Bombay and Karachi through the long 19th century, seeking to embed South Asia’s urban “slum” problem within the global urban housing and labor crisis at the turn of the century.

Marc Forster, Henry B. Plant Professor, Department of History

Marc Forster

Henry B. Plant Professor of History, Director of the Toor Cummings Center for International Studies and the Liberal Arts (CISLA)

An historian of early modern Germany (1500-1800), Marc Forster's last fifteen years of research has focused on the development of Catholic identity, primarily in southern and western Germany.

Sandy Grande, Associate Professor of Education, Special Adviser to the President for Institutional Equity and Diversity, 2004-2005, Chair of Education Department

Sandy Grande

Professor of Education, Director of the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity (CCSRE)

As a teacher and scholar, Sandy Grande centers her work in the belief that education is the heart of a critical democracy. She asserts that questions about education cannot be reduced to disciplinary parameters, but must include issues of power, history, self-identity and the possibility of collective agency and revolutionary struggle. Thus, rather than reject the language of politics, Professor Grande constructs teaching as the link between public education and the imperatives of democracy. 

Sarah Queen, Professor of History, Connecticut College

Sarah A. Queen

Professor of History

Sarah Queen's primary research examines China's philosophical and religious foundations as it was expressed in early texts written by practitioners of the Confucian and Daoist traditions. Her research focuses on the ways in which these two traditions shaped early ethical and spiritual norms, conceptions of the body, state, and cosmos as well as Confucian and Daoist self-cultivation as distinctive forms of religious experience.

Elizabeth Reich, Assistant Professor of Film Studies, Connecticut College

Elizabeth Reich

Assistant Professor of Film Studies

Elizabeth Reich teaches and writes about race and cinema. Her first monograph, "Militant Visions: Black Soldiers, Internationalism and the Transformation of American Cinema," will be out from Rutgers University Press in August 2016.

Julie Rivkin, Associate Dean of the Faculty, Professor of English

Julie Rivkin

Professor of English

As an English professor, Julie Rivkin works on American literature and literary theory, and recently turned her attention to issues raised by gender studies and contemporary literature. She is probably best known for her work on Henry James: her book False Positions: The Representational Logics of Henry James's Fiction (Stanford University Press, 1996) offers approachable yet theoretical readings of James's novels.

Doug Thompson, professor of geology, Connecticut College

Douglas M. Thompson

Rosemary Park Professor of Physics, Astronomy and Geophysics, Chair of the Physics, Astronomy and Geophysics Department

Doug Thompson's research falls within the discipline of geology and the sub-discipline of fluvial geomorphology. Geomorphology is best defined as the study of the landforms and the natural processes responsible for their formation. Many of the geomorphic topics of interest include the landforms and processes associated with rivers, glaciers, landslides, beaches and arid regions.

Thematic Inquiry

Students will choose one of the following courses in conjunction with a two-credit Thematic Inquiry Seminar.

ECO 225 ECO HIS/HIS ECO THOUGHT I (Modes B and E)
EDU 223 FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION (Mode E)
FLM 226 CINEMA AND REVOLUTION
GWS 224 TRANSNATNL WOMEN’S MOVEMNTS (Mode E)
HIS 117 INTRO TO GLOBALIZATION (Mode E)
HIS 216 MODERN LATIN AMERICA
HIS 219 REVOLUTIONS IN LATIN AMERICA
HIS 233 GLOBAL CHINA (Modes B and E)
HIS 252 SOCIAL JUSTICE AND ENVIRONMENT
HIS 262 MODERNIZING CHINA (Modes B and E)
REL 198 CC:RELIGIOUS PRACTICES/ECOLOGY (Modes B and E)

Curricular Itinerary

Mode A: Creative Expression
ART 102 CONCEPTS IN THREE DIMENSIONS
ART 200 PHOTOGRAPHY I
COM 217 ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE DESIGN
DAN 114 HIP HOP DANCE I
DAN 119 PERFORMING HIP HOP CULTURE
DAN 162 WEST AFRICAN DANCE
DAN 165 AFRO-CARIBBEAN DANCE I
FLM 220 DOCUMENTARY THRY & PRODUCTN

Mode B: Critical Inquiry and Analysis
AMS 465 GLOBALZTN & AM CUL SINCE 1945
DAN 119 PERFORMING HIP HOP CULTURE
FLM 209 INTERSECT IDENT IN AMER FILM
FLM 395B CHANG THE IMAGE: BLACK CINEMA
FLM 396B CHANG THE IMAGE: BLACK CINEMA
HIS 224 CONFUCIAN TRADITIONS
HIS 324 GLOBALIZING CHINESE ACTIVISM
REL 323 GLOBAL INDIG:REL & RESISTANCE
SRS 299B THE IDEAL OF EQUALITY
THE 199 CC:AIDS EPIDEMIC THEATER/FILM
THE 266 MUSICAL THEATER IN AMER CUL
THE 399 AIDS EPIDEMIC THEATER/FILM

Mode C: Quantitative and Formal Reasoning
COM 205 TOPICS IN SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT
COM 217 ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE DESIGN
ECO 322 GAME THEORY
MAT 105 INTRO MATHEMATICAL THOUGHT
MAT 107 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS
MAT 108 MATHEMATICS OF MONEY
MAT 110 CC: NETWORKS & THEIR APPLCTNS

Mode D: Scientific Inquiry and Analysis
AST 105 SOLAR SYSTEM ASTRONOMY
ES 110 ENV STDS AS A NATURAL SCIENCE
ES 120 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY
ES 315 RIVER ENVIRONMENTS
PHY 113 ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Mode E: Social and Historical Inquiry
ECO 227 ECONOMICS AND MORALITY
ECO 237 ECON GROWTH/DEVEL IN LAT AMER
ECO 250 ECONOMIC JUSTICE
GWS 224 TRANSNATNL WOMEN’S MOVEMNTS
HIS 120 CC: THE AMERICAN WEST
HIS 224 CONFUCIAN TRADITIONS
HIS 306 GLOBALIZATION OF URBAN POVERTY
HIS 324 GLOBALIZING CHINESE ACTIVISM
REL 323 GLOBAL INDIG:REL & RESISTANCE
SLA 230 GEND COMMUNST/POST-COMM SOC
SRS 299B THE IDEAL OF EQUALITY

Courses Not Currently Designated with a Mode of Inquiry
ART 205 DRAWING FUNDAMENTALS
ART 226 SCULPTURE FOR A SMALL PLANET
BIO 310 CONSERVATION BIOLOGY
COM 325 INTRO TO CYBERSECURITY
DAN 145 HISTORY OF DANCE
ECO 210 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS
ECO 231 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC DEVLPMT
ECO 234 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
ECO 235 GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT
ENG 367 NOVEL COMMODITIES
ES 210 HYDROLOGY
ES 259 MINING AND THE ENVIRONMENT
ES 493D GEOLOGIC HAZARDS & HUMANS
ES 494D GEOLOGIC HAZARDS & HUMANS
FLM 226 CINEMA AND REVOLUTION
FLM 395R REVENGE CINEMA
FLM 396R REVENGE CINEMA
FYS 1XXX GANDHI AND HIS CRITICS
FYS 1XXX MADE IN CHINA
GOV 224 EMERGING ECON IN ASIA & LAT AM
HIS 247 SOVIET UNION & ITS LEGACIES
HIS 428 DEBATING CHINA’S GLOBALIZATION
THE 241 THEATER & CULTURE I

Suggested Global-Local Engagement

Study Away

Since the Pathway aims to provide opportunities for students to consider questions relating to global capitalism, students will ideally pursue opportunities to study abroad in various locales across the globe that creates the optimum environment to pursue their animating question. In consultation with Pathway Faculty, students will work with the Study Away Office to identify and pursue College-approved study away programs as well as the College’s own Study Away-Teach Away programs such as SATA Cuba, SATA Vietnam, SATA Peru, SATA Italy, SIT South Africa, SIT India, and SIT Kenya.

Internships

Students will work with Pathway Faculty to identify potential internships in the context of the GCIP two-credit sophomore seminar. Some possible student internships include the Coalition for Inclusive Capitalism, Buffett International Summer Internships (SIGP), Natural Capitalism Internships, Clinton Global Initiative (GCI) America Internships, Center for Global Justice Internships, Eugene O’Neill Theatre Internships, and Lyman Allyn Art Museum Internships.

Community-Based Learning

Students will work with Pathway Faculty and Community Partnerships to identify local community-based learning opportunities in the context of the GCIP two-credit sophomore seminar. Connecticut College theater, art, and dance productions, performances, and installations will provide opportunities for local engagement. A number of local venues such as Mystic Seaport Museum, Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center, Lyman Allyn Art Museum, Custom House Maritime Museum, New London Food Pantry, and New London Main Street Revitalization Program are all potential sites for community-based engagement.

 

For more information, please contact Sarah Queen or any other member of the core faculty.