Courses



General Information

The Department of Government Course Brochure (pdf) is issued annually. Course information on this page is from the brochure. It is intended to assist government and international relations students in designing a major that best meets their needs and interests. Some of the material in this brochure is included in the College Catalog; if there are any discrepancies between the two, the rules and regulations of the College Catalog are binding. The Brochure includes only those courses scheduled to be taught during AY 2013-2014; see the College Catalog for the complete listing of the department's curriculum and regulations. Check the online catalog for additional information.

I. Course Levels and Selections

The 100-level courses are intended for freshmen and sophomores. No particular sequence is intended by the numbering of these courses. None has a pre-requisite. Each is regarded by the Department as an introduction to one of the fields of political science. Basic principles of political behavior are taught as part of the subject matter of each course, and an understanding of these principles is necessary for work at the intermediate and advanced levels. Juniors and seniors may not take 100-level courses except with the permission of the instructor. At least eight courses in the major must be taken at the 200-level or above.

Students are urged to give careful thought to their course selection and to take account of related disciplines which enhance the major and prepare them for their post-graduate careers. Majors should review course offerings in the social sciences, particularly in history and economics, and study topics which broaden their competence in their special field. For some careers it is as important to be aware of economic history or industrial organization as it is to acquire skills in accounting and computer science. In other cases, majors might be more concerned with comparative studies of Western and/or non-Western societies. For students interested in public policy, courses in economics or environmental studies may be especially useful. Students seeking careers on the international level should acquire some competence in foreign policy and a foreign language. This will provide greater cultural awareness and a competitive edge in job placement.

All majors should develop an understanding of the basic issues of our times and the diversity of cultures and values at national and international levels. No student can take work in all of the disciplines offered by the College, but all students can design an individual program which serves both their liberal education and career goals.

The Major in Government

The major consists of ten or more semester courses, at least eight of which shall be at the 200-level or above. Three courses must be at the 300-level or above, including a 400-level Government seminar in the junior or senior year at Connecticut College. Honors Study (497-498) or Individual Study (491, 492), supervised by a Connecticut College Government professor, may be taken in lieu of the 400-level seminar. Students taking Honors Study must complete at least eleven courses in the major for graduation. Under normal circumstances majors must take at least seven of the major courses at Connecticut College.

Each major must include at least one semester course in each of the following fields:

(1) Political Theory (110, 211, 214, 216, 318, 399, or relevant seminar or special topic).

(2) Comparative Politics Comparative Politics (112, 220, 224, 225, 230, 238, 251, 277, 308, 309, 320, 321, 322, or relevant seminar or special topic).

(3) U.S. Politics (111, 212, 221, 226, 231, 233, 250, 260, 262, 284, 304, 316, 335, 336, or relevant seminar or special topic).

(4) International Politics (113, 206, 207, 215, 220, 225, 228, 229, 252, 305, 307, 320, 324, 325, 326, 348, 352, or relevant seminar or special topic).

The Major in International Relations

International Relations is an interdisciplinary major administered by the Government Department. It consists of ten or more semester courses. At least eight must be at the 200-level or above. Two Government courses must be at the 300-level or above, including a 400-level Government seminar taken in the junior or senior year. Courses must be taken from the departments of Government, History, and Economics. Six of the courses must be in Government and four from related social science fields. Students who do Honors Study (two courses) must present eleven courses in the major. At least seven courses (eight for honors) must be taken at Connecticut College. A Government Honors Study (497-498) or and Individual Study (491, 492) may be taken in lieu of the seminar.

Students must develop a particular focus to the major, such as foreign policy analysis, international political economy, the developing world, environmental politics, security studies, international relations theory, human rights, politics or international politics of a region, ethnic conflict, terrorism, or other approved topic. You must develop this focus in consultation with your adviser by early in the junior year.

In addition to the College language requirement, majors must take at least one course in a modern foreign language beyond the intermediate level. Students taking Chinese, Japanese, or Arabic must complete the intermediate level series. To become and remain fluent in the language, as well as to be competitive for certain graduate programs, students are encouraged to take language courses through the senior year.

Students are also encouraged to study abroad, especially if language immersion is involved. To gain practical experience and to make professional contacts, students are encouraged to do an internship with a governmental or non-governmental organization concerned with international affairs.

In planning a schedule of courses, check the catalog for prerequisites to courses. For example, almost all of the Economics courses listed below for the required course in international economics require both Economics 111 and 112. Courses listed here suggest the types of courses that fit the requirements. In consultation with your advisor, some substitutions are permitted. For instance, if taken in Germany, a course in German foreign policy taught by a Politics Department could meet the foreign policy requirement.

The required Government courses are Government 113 and five others, of which at least two shall be at the 300-level or above, selected as follows:

(1) One in Foreign Policy selected from: Government 206, 215, 252, 320, 352, or appropriate advanced course.

(2) One in International Politics selected from: Government 206, 207, 220, 225, 228, 229, 305, 307, 320, 324, 325, 326, 348, or appropriate advanced course.

(3) One in Comparative Politics selected from: Government 112, 220, 224, 225, 230, 238, 251, 277, 308, 309, 322, or appropriate advanced course.

(4) One other 200-, 300-, or 400-level Government course in the International Relations, Foreign Policy, or Comparative fields noted above. Government 316, National Security vs. Personal Freedom, can also satisfy this requirement.

(5) A Government seminar taken at Connecticut College during the junior or senior year: 400-level Government International Relations, Foreign Policy or Comparative Politics seminar. An alternative is Honors Study (497-498) or an Individual Study (491 or 492) supervised by a Connecticut College Government professor.

Four additional, non-Government courses selected as follows:

(1) One in Economics selected from: 208, 210, 211, 216, 220, 228, 234, 235, 237, 316, 319, 330, 332, or appropriate advanced course.

(2) One in History selected from: 202, 207, 216, 219, 220, 224, 226, 234, 243, 247, 250, 251, 254, 255, 262, 264, 272, 278, 305, 318, 324, 325, 342, 344, 353, 371, or appropriate advanced course.

(3) (4) Any of the Economics or History courses noted above plus ECO 224; Anthropology 224, 234, 245, 260, 280, 307, 313, 315, 360, or 363; Gender & Women’s Studies 224; Philosophy 232; Religious Studies 248, 304; Sociology 207; or an appropriate advanced course, Individual Study, or Honors Thesis.

Advisers: Profs. T. Borer, J. Dawson, A. Hybel, D. Patton, W. Rose, J. Tian

The Minor in Government

A minor in government shall consist of a minimum of five courses in a field as defined in the major. Ordinarily, only one course can be taken elsewhere. The five or more courses may be distributed as follows:

(1) May include the 100-level introductory course in the field.

(2) At least one 300 or 400-level course in the field during the junior or senior year. Independent Studies (391, 392, 491, 492) may be used in lieu of the relevant advanced course or seminar.

(3) At least two 200 or 300-level courses in the field, normally taken prior to enrollment in the advanced course or seminar.

(4) The fifth course must be beyond the 100-level and with the permission of the advisor may be taken in a related field.

The following concentrations are offered:

(1) U.S. Politics, drawn from the following courses: 111, 212, 221, 226, 231, 233, 250, 258, 260, 262, 284, 304, 316, 335, 336, or relevant seminar or special topic.
Advisors: Profs. Borrelli, Frasure, James.

(2) International Politics, drawn from the following courses: 113, 206, 207, 215, 220, 225, 228, 229, 252, 305, 307, 320, 324, 325, 326, 348, 352, or relevant seminar or special topic. One course from comparative politics at the 200-level or above may be included.
Advisors: Profs. Borer, Dawson, Hybel, Patton, Rose, Tian.

(3) Comparative Politics, drawn from the following courses: 112, 220, 224, 225, 230, 238, 251, 277, 308, 309, 320, 322, or relevant seminar or special topic. One course from international politics at the 200-level or above may be included.
Advisors: Profs. Borer, Dawson, Hybel, Patton, Tian.

(4) Political Theory, drawn from the following courses: 110, 211, 214, 304, 318, 399, or relevant seminar or special topic.
Advisor: Prof. Coats.

(5) Public Policy, drawn from the following courses: 110, 111, 112, 113, 215, 220, 233, 251, 252, 258, 260, 262, 307, 324, 326, 336, 352, or relevant seminar or special topic.
Advisers: Profs. Borer, Borrelli, Dawson, Frasure, James

Contact Information:

Phone:
860-439-2037

Fax:
860-439-2190

Email Tristan Borer
tabor@conncoll.edu

 

Department of Government and
International Relations
270 Mohegan Avenue
New London, CT 06320
Office: 305B Fanning