Art History and Architectural Studies



Professor:  Van Slyck; Associate Professors:  Alchermes, Baldwin, Ning; Assistant Professor:  Gonzalez Rice; Visiting Instructor:  Morash; Professor Steiner, chair

The Major in Art History

The major consists of at least eleven courses in the history of art.  Majors must take the two-semester survey, eight courses at the 200 or 300 level, and one seminar at the 400 level.  Majors who have scored 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement examination and completed a year-long survey course are exempt from the two-semester survey, but must still take eleven courses.  No exemption is available for students who have completed only a one-semester survey course in high school.  Among a student’s courses at the 200 level or above, at least three must be on Western art or architecture before 1800 and at least three on art or architecture after 1800; in addition, one must be on non-Western art.  Students studying abroad for a semester may count no more than two courses toward the major (and no more than three if abroad for a year).

               One of the following courses may be counted toward the major in place of a 200-level course:  Art 101, 102, or 103.

               Students majoring in art history should consider electing relevant courses in history, literature, philosophy, or religion.  Majors contemplating graduate study are advised to take courses in the languages of the discipline, French and German.

Advisers:  J. Alchermes, R. Baldwin, Q. Ning, C. Steiner

The Minor in Art History

The minor consists of six courses.  The required courses include the two-semester survey, three intermediate level courses (200-300), and one 400-level seminar.  At least one of the intermediate courses (200-300) should deal with art before 1800.  Minors who have scored 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement exam and completed a year-long survey course are exempt from the two-semester survey, but must still take six courses.  No exemption is available for students who have completed only a one-semester survey course in high school.

Learning Goals in the Art History Major

The Art History program provides majors with critical knowledge of visual culture.  The program teaches visual literacy in the history of art of global cultures from antiquity to the present; develops strong research, written, and critical thinking skills; and cultivates students′ abilities to synthesize cultural, historical, political, and social information as it relates to the visual arts.

When they graduate, Art History majors will:

  • Recognize the styles and periods conventionally used to categorize Western art from antiquity through the present.
  • Be able to identify representative works from those styles and periods, to describe their salient formal characteristics (materials, composition, iconography), and to relate these works to their cultural and historical contexts.
  • Be familiar with perspectives on visual culture outside the Western canon.
  • Understand the relationship between art and social constructions, including race, class, gender, sexuality, and nationality.
  • Be able to communicate effectively about art, both verbally and in writing, applying complex forms of analysis in oral presentations and essay-length papers using clear and concise prose.
  • Be able to design and execute a research project: define a question; employ appropriate technologies to locate pertinent primary and secondary sources; identify a suitable analytical method; and apply that method to write a well-argued, fully-documented interpretive paper.
  • Be able to understand and engage effectively with debates in the art world.
  • Be able to offer critical appraisements of art history scholarship and writings addressed to popular audiences.

Courses

ART HISTORY  101  SURVEY OF THE HISTORY OF ART, I  An introduction to the history of Western art from its beginnings to the period of Gothic cathedrals.  Painting, sculpture, architecture, and decorative arts in their social, cultural, and historical contexts.  Emphasis on new discoveries and theories that have significantly changed our understanding of ancient and medieval art.

               Enrollment limited to 40 students per section.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 121.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7.  J. Alchermes

ART HISTORY  102  SURVEY OF THE HISTORY OF ART, II  Western painting, sculpture, and architecture in relation to political, social, religious, and intellectual change from the Renaissance through postmodernism.

               Enrollment limited to 40 students per section.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 122.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7.  K. Gonzalez Rice, R. Baldwin

ART HISTORY  103  ARCHITECTURE 1400-PRESENT  Architecture from the Italian Renaissance in the 15th century to critiques of Modernism in the post-World War II period, considered in the context of social, cultural, economic, and political developments.  Emphasis on Europe and the United States, with attention to urbanism and landscape architecture.

               No prerequisite, but Course 101 (formerly 121) is recommended.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 123.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7.  E. Morash

ART HISTORY  104  INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN ART  This course will take a topical approach to the arts of India, China, and Japan.  Lectures typically focus on one or two monuments as case studies so as to treat them in greater depth.  Case studies will highlight specific genres such as narrative painting, devotional sculpture, funerary art, landscape, and popular subjects.  The course presumes no previous exposure to the arts of Asia.  This is the same course as East Asian Studies 225.

               Enrollment limited to 40 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 225.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  Q. Ning

ART HISTORY  200  CHINESE ART AND RELIGION  This course is a survey of the arts and religions of China and an introduction to the technique of visual analysis in historical studies.  It examines Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism from the perspective of visual representation and religious practice.  Lamaism in Tibet, Mazu cult in Taiwan, and other local religions in the bordering regions of China will also be introduced.  This is the same course as East Asian Studies 200.

               Enrollment limited to 35 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 226/Religious Studies 223.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  Q. Ning

ART HISTORY  203  MODERN CHINESE ART  This is an introduction to major events and figures in modern Chinese art and cultural history.  The course will examine visual phenomena such as political posters, national art shows, "model operas," experimental films, and popular TV programs from the perspective of national identity, gender roles, visual expression, personal choice, and collective memory.  This is the same course as East Asian Studies 203.

               Enrollment limited to 27 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  Q. Ning

ART HISTORY  205  THE ARCHITECTURE OF JAPAN  This is the same course as East Asian Studies 205.  Refer to the East Asian Studies listing for a course description.

ART HISTORY  206  AFRICAN ART  Art and aesthetics of Africa and the African diaspora, with emphasis on the social function of objects in different contexts of creation, use, and display.  Topics include art in the cycle of life, masquerades, status and display, gender, Islam and Christianity, the cult of Mami Wata, popular and contemporary painting, sacred arts of Haitian Vodou, and the history of collecting and exhibiting African art.

               Enrollment limited to 35 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 211.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  C. Steiner

ART HISTORY  207  ISLAMIC ART  An introduction to both the monumental architecture and decoration and to the small-scale, often precious, objects associated with daily life in the Islamic societies of Europe, North Africa, and Asia.

               No prerequisite, but Course 101 (formerly 121) is recommended.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 305.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  J. Alchermes

ART HISTORY  211  IMAGES OF STATE, FAMILY, AND INDIVIDUAL IN ANCIENT ROME  Public art and architecture as well as private house design/decoration gave form to the ambitions of the Roman state and proclaimed the status of families and individuals.  Developments in the painting, sculpture, and architecture of Rome, of Italian towns such as Pompeii and Herculaneum, and of other cities in Rome′s vast, culturally varied empire.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen who have taken Course 101 (formerly 121).  Enrollment limited to 27 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 222.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  J. Alchermes

ART HISTORY  220  EARLY CHRISTIAN AND BYZANTINE ART:  FROM CONSTANTINE THE GREAT TO MEHMET THE CONQUEROR  Focus on the late Roman and Byzantine patrons and artists who created works that set a standard throughout Europe, western Asia, and the Near East.  Forces (social, intellectual, economic, theological, political) that shaped and were shaped by works of art.  This is the same course as Slavic Studies 220.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen who have taken Course 101 (formerly 121).  Enrollment limited to 27 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History/Slavic Studies 248.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  J. Alchermes

ART HISTORY  221  MEDIEVAL ARCHITECTURE  Medieval buildings and their contexts:  political, social, ideological, liturgical, and spiritual.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 27 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 260.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  J. Alchermes

ART HISTORY  230  FROM FRA ANGELICO TO BOTTICELLI AND BELLINI:  EARLY ITALIAN RENAISSANCE ART  The art of Masaccio, Donatello, Fra Angelico, Piero, Mantegna, Botticelli and Bellini and the major social groups patronizing their art (church, aristocracy, and merchant class).  Major topics include the growth of cities and civic culture, the revival of classical antiquity, the invention of "art" and "artist," the rise of portraiture, mythology and landscape, the continuing medieval spiritual legacy, and new ideas on gender, sexuality, and the family.

               Enrollment limited to 27 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 228.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  R. Baldwin

ART HISTORY  231  FROM VAN EYCK TO BOSCH AND BRUEGEL:  RENAISSANCE ART IN NORTHERN EUROPE, 1400-1500  The art of 15th- and 16th-century Northern Europe.  Major artists include Van Eyck, Bosch, Dürer, Grünewald, and Bruegel.  Topics include court culture (hunting, pastoral gardens, chivalry, and courtly love); religious art (devotional imagery and the Reformation); middle class art (civic issues, commerce, witchcraft, sexuality); and the rise of new, more secular vocabularies such as portraiture and everyday life.

               Enrollment limited to 35 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 218.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  R. Baldwin

ART HISTORY  232  LEONARDO, MICHELANGELO, TITIAN:  HIGH RENAISSANCE ART IN ITALY  Course examines Italian Renaissance art and humanism between 1500-1600, the expansion of mythology, portraiture, history painting and landscape, the rise of villa culture and new forms of pastoral and gardens.  Art is examined within a larger social history focusing on the changing moral, political, economic, and sexual values of church, court, and burgher elites.  Artists include Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo, Titian, Palladio, and Bronzino.

               Enrollment limited to 35 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 229.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  R. Baldwin

ART HISTORY  234  CARAVAGGIO, BERNINI, VELASQUEZ:  BAROQUE ART IN ITALY, FRANCE, AND SPAIN  With a focus on powerful patrons (aristocracy and the church), this course explores changes in Baroque artistic vocabularies, style modes, the function of images, and the role of artists at a time of the emerging nation state, global exploration and empire, early scientific culture, and the Counter-Reformation.  Major artists include Caravaggio, Bernini, Velasquez, La Tour, Carracci, Poussin, and Claude.  Topics include Catholic visual piety,  court festivals and entertainments (Versailles), classical myth and allegory, pastoral landscape and villa culture, everyday imagery, and still life.

               Enrollment limited to 35 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 233.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  R. Baldwin

ART HISTORY  235  REMBRANDT, VERMEER, RUBENS:  BAROQUE ART IN NORTHERN EUROPE  Baroque art in the Catholic, court culture of the southern Netherlands (Rubens, Jordaens, Van Dyck) and in the Protestant, republican, burgher culture of the northern Netherlands (Rembrandt, Steen, Vermeer).  Topics include the Counter-Reformation and Reformation, the politics of landscape art (pastoral, farming, seascape), and the social meaning of everyday imagery (domestic scenes, gender, music, still-life).

               Enrollment limited to 27 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 223.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  R. Baldwin

ART HISTORY  242  CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY IN WESTERN ART, RENAISSANCE TO MODERN  A social history of mythology and the elite social groups who patronized its heroic subjects.  Mythology as cosmic nature and universal order, as courtly empire, genealogy and social hierarchy, as sexual fantasy and freedom, and as moral and spiritual allegory.  This is the same course as Classics 242.
               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  R. Baldwin

 ART HISTORY  246  NINETEENTH-CENTURY ART  Visual strategies and historical contexts of art-making in the nineteenth century, from Goya and David to Cassatt and Van Gogh.  Special attention paid to the visual impact of popular culture, science, and technologies like photography and the x-ray, and the problems of art markets and economics, nationalism and imperialism, industrialization and social reform.

               Enrollment limited to 27 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 235.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  K. Gonzalez Rice

ART HISTORY  251  HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY  A survey of the history of the photographic image concentrating on its development as an art medium and exploring the relation of photography to other art forms, science, and the contemporary social fabric.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 35 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 240.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7.  Staff

ART HISTORY  260  EARLY TWENTIETH-CENTURY ART  Modernism in the visual arts from the late 19th century to WWII.  Explores the visual forms and historical contexts of art-making in Europe and the Americas.  Special attention to controversies around gender, primitivism, anarchism and nationalism, war and violence, abstraction and figuration, and others key issues of representation.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 231.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  K. Gonzalez Rice

ART HISTORY  261  LATE TWENTIETH-CENTURY ART  Contexts and controversies of contemporary art between 1945 and 1989, from Pollock′s action paintings to Basquiat′s graffiti art.  Explores key debates around art and everyday life in Cold War Europe and the Americas, postmodern art practices, uses of new media, and the shifting roles of artists, spectators, and art markets.

               Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 27 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  K. Gonzalez Rice

ART HISTORY  265  POP ART  Art and popular culture in the 1960s, from Warhol′s soup cans to junk sculpture and happenings in Europe and the Americas.  Traces the visual impacts of advertising, commercialism, and the media connections between art and everyday life, counterculture and Cold War politics, and feminism and civil rights.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 27 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 236.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  K. Gonzalez Rice

ART HISTORY  266  FEMINIST CREATIVITIES:  ″HOW SUPERMAN AND WONDERWOMAN KILLED GOD:  HOW THE AMERICAN GRAPHIC NOVEL BECAME A SERIOUSLY SECULAR ART FORM″  This is the same course as Gender and Women's Studies 266.  Refer to the Gender and Women's Studies listing for a course description.

ART HISTORY  270  INTRODUCTION TO LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE  This is an investigation of the cultural and ecological significance of the designed landscape considered in historical perspective with case studies and through discussion of contemporary practice and theory.  The class will study the great gardens of the world and analyze how landscape architects and everyday people communicate through the shaping of the land.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 35 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 277.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  Staff

ART HISTORY  272  NINETEENTH-CENTURY ARCHITECTURE  A survey of major stylistic developments, new building types and technologies, as well as numerous debates on style and the changing conditions of architectural and design production during the "long" nineteenth century (1750-1914).  Emphasis is on the social context within which architecture and the decorative arts were produced, taking into account the growth of cities, as well as issues of ethnicity, class, and gender.

               Prerequisite:  Course 102 or 103, or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 35 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 216.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  Staff

ART HISTORY  276  AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE  A survey of American architecture from initial European contact to the present, focusing on the social, political, and historical context of buildings.  Emphasis will be placed on local and regional examples.

              Prerequisite:  Art History 101, 102, or 103, or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 217.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  E. Morash

ART HISTORY  277  TWENTIETH-CENTURY ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN  A review of the development of the modern movement in architecture and design from the turn of the twentieth century to the present.  Analysis of the established canon of modern architecture is counterbalanced with a discussion of broad social, cultural, political, and technological trends.

               Prerequisite:  Course 102 or 103.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 273.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  E. Morash

ART HISTORY  278  ARCHITECTURE SINCE 1945  Architectural production in the postwar period (including works by Louis Kahn, Robert Venturi, Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid and others), with attention to cultural, technical, aesthetic, and theoretical factors affecting architecture and urban form.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 27 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 245.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  A. Van Slyck

ART HISTORY  279  CONTEMPORARY ARCHITECTURE  An examination of the changing trends in contemporary architectural practice from the 1990s to the present.  Topics include the mechanics of fame and the role of the architect in society, sustainability, technology, materials, construction techniques, and globalization.  Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which contemporary architecture is shaped by architects themselves and through popular media.

               Prerequisite:  Course 277 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 27 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  E. Morash

ART HISTORY  280  INTRODUCTION TO MUSEUM STUDIES  History, theory, and practice of museums; philosophy of exhibitions and display strategies; and educational, political, and social role of the museum.  Introduction to the diversity of museums in this region, with field trips and behind-the-scenes tours.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 25 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 258.  This is a designated Writing course.  C. Steiner

ART HISTORY  281  CURRENT ISSUES IN MUSEUM STUDIES:  ETHICS AND CONTROVERSIES  Critical reading of current debates and issues regarding museums.  Analysis of case studies of controversial museums/exhibitions, including topics on censorship, pornography, creationism, racism, nationalism, corporate sponsorship, repatriation of cultural property, ethics of deaccessioning, and critiques of museum practices by contemporary artists.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 35 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 263.  This is a designated Writing course.  C. Steiner

ART HISTORY  282  MUSEUM METHODS  Through a series of creative and interactive lectures, classroom projects, and trips to local museums, students investigate and analyze "best practices" in the burgeoning field of museum work.  Issues related to museum collections, exhibition design, museum education, technology, art conservation, and new audiences will be addressed.

               Prerequisite:  Course 280.  Enrollment limited to 25 studentsStudents may not receive credit for this course and Art History 270.  Staff

ART HISTORY  283  MUSEUM EDUCATION  A survey of perspectives and resources on the educative functions of museum programs and exhibits.  Topics will include recent research on the learning that occurs in museums, theories of informal learning, museum visitor behavior, and educational design strategies for exhibits and museum program contexts.  Students will complete a research project and visit area museums to study visitor learning behaviors.  This is the same course as Education 283.

               Enrollment limited to 25 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History/Education 274.  Staff

ART HISTORY  284  HOUSE MUSEUMS  From farmhouses to Newport mansions, house museums in America are as diverse as the people who lived in them.  Nevertheless these domestic places share common museum traits as public institutions.  This course examines the organizational structure of the house museum as well as the different interpretation strategies represented in them.

               Enrollment limited to 27 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 275.  Staff

ART HISTORY  296  PHILOSOPHY OF ART  This is the same course as Philosophy 251.  Refer to the Philosophy listing for a course description.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 230.

ART HISTORY  297  COSTUME HISTORY  This is the same course as Theater 297.  Refer to the Theater listing for a course description.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 207/Theater 207.

ART HISTORY  299  SECRECY:  POWER, PRIVILEGE, AND THE INVISIBLE  This is the same course as Anthropology 299/Sophomore Research Seminar 299D.  Refer to the Sophomore Research Seminar listing in College Courses for a course description.

ART HISTORY  301  BUDDHIST ART:  INDIA, CHINA, AND JAPAN  An introduction to Buddhist art (architecture, sculpture, painting) in India, China, and Japan, with particular emphasis on iconography and the social-political implications of Buddhist images in their historical and ritual context.  This is the same course as East Asian Studies 312.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 312.  This is a designated Writing course.  Q. Ning

ART HISTORY  310  GREEK AND ROMAN ARCHAEOLOGY  Selected Greek and Roman sites are analyzed in considering the methods and motives of research as well as the uses to which Graeco-Roman antiquity has been put by archaeologists, their patrons, and the broader public.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen who have taken Course 101 or received permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 35 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 238.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  J. Alchermes

ART HISTORY  320  FROM WATTEAU TO CHRISTO:  NATURE IN WESTERN ART FROM THE ENLIGHTENMENT TO MODERNITY, 1700-2000  An interdisciplinary study of Western landscape representation from the early 18th century to the present.  The course considers shifts in the major modes of landscape:  garden, pastoral, agriculture, seascape, and wilderness.  Students will read primary sources and write analysis of art works for each class.  This is the same course as Environmental Studies 320.

               No prerequisite, but Course 102 is recommended.  Enrollment limited to 27 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History/Environmental Studies 224.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  R. Baldwin

ART HISTORY  356  IMAGINING OTHERNESS IN VISUAL CULTURE  Representations of race, class, ethnicity, and gender in art and popular culture from Antiquity to the present.  Emphasis on how stereotypes are constructed and reproduced in woodcuts, engravings, painting, sculpture, photography, film, television, advertising, spectacle, and performance.  This is the same course as Anthropology/Comparative Race and Ethnicity 356.

               Prerequisite:  One course in anthropology or art history.  Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors; and to freshmen with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  C. Steiner

ART HISTORY  360  RADICAL BODIES:  CONTEMPORARY ART AND ACTION  Visual art practices, histories, theories, and ethics of performance art.  Includes performance art viewings, interdisciplinary dialogue about identity and trauma, social critique, collaboration in current and past performances, and participation in ongoing debates and controversies related to action- and body-based art. This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 327.

               Open to juniors and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 18 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 327.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  K. Gonzalez Rice

ART HISTORY  361  ENVIRONMENTAL ART AND ITS ETHICS  An exploration of the history and ethics of Environmental Art, a contemporary art movement using the environment−urban or rural landscape, plants and animals, and even garbage−as the material of art.  An examination of how environmental artists protest overconsumption, pollution, and environmental injustice, and what their artworks, theories, and ethics contribute to dialogues about sustainability and environmentalism.  This is the same course as Environmental Studies 361.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 27 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  K. Gonzalez Rice

ART HISTORY  370  GENDER IN ARCHITECTURE  Historical perspectives on the gendered nature of architectural production (broadly defined to include patronage, design, construction, and historiography) and on the design and use of the built environment to reinforce and challenge socially-constructed ideas of gender.

               Open to juniors and seniors and to sophomores who have completed Course 103 (formerly 123).  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 325.  This is a designated Writing course.  A. Van Slyck

ART HISTORY  371  DOMESTIC ARCHITECTURE IN THE UNITED STATES  The history of houses and housing in the United States; how social, cultural, political, and economic forces have shaped the buildings in which people have lived from the 17th through the 20th centuries.

               Open to juniors and seniors and to sophomores who have completed Course 103.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 326.  This is a designated Writing course.  A. Van Slyck

ART HISTORY  372  RACE AND SPACE  Focusing primarily on the United States, this course provides an historical consideration of the ways architectural and urban space shape social interaction and reinforce racial and ethnic hierarchies; the ways the lived experience of such spaces contributes to racial and ethnic identities; and the racialized practices of the design professions.

               Prerequisite:  One architectural history course or American Studies 206, or permission of the instructor.  Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 340.  This is a designated Writing course.  A. Van Slyck

ART HISTORY  373  HOME:  THE WHY BEHIND THE WAY WE LIVE  An examination of the development of numerous housing types in America.  Have you ever wondered why we live the way we do in the homes we do?  The prevalence of the single-family home today and its importance as the symbol of the ″American dream″ was not a foregone conclusion.  The home has been the focus of and battleground for cooperative movements, feminism, municipal socialism, as well as government interventions on a national scale.  This is the same course as American Studies 373.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  Staff

ART HISTORY  400 LEVEL  ADVANCED STUDY SEMINARS  Seminars concerned with research in various fields of art and art history with discussions and reports based on current literature, new methodologies, and contemporary critical problems.

               One course in art history (unless otherwise noted).  Open to juniors and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This is a designated Writing course.

ART HISTORY  400  ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY ALONG THE SILK ROAD  An examination of the major 20th-century archaeological finds along the Silk Road; socio-political and cultural implications of archaeology in a modern context; exchange of merchandise and ideas between Chang'an and Rome in the first millennium; and issues of colonialism, nationalism, and cultural politics involved in the transfer of artifacts from their original locations to the home countries of archaeologists.  This is the same course as East Asian Studies 450.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493G, 494G.  Q. Ning

ART HISTORY  401  CHINESE CINEMA:  SEX, VIOLENCE, AND VISUALITY  An introduction to Chinese cinema focusing on three themes: the color of sex, violence, and revolution; the woman as symbol; and the dream of a strong China.  Varying methods of cinematic analysis will be introduced with case studies, as the course explores issues of gender, politics, and visuality in Chinese films and society.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493N, 494N.  Q. Ning

ART HISTORY  402  MOMENTS IN CONTEMPORARY CHINESE ART  This is the same course as East Asian Studies 451.  Refer to the East Asian Studies listing for a course description.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493L, 494L.

ART HISTORY  410  ROMAN ARCHITECTURE  This is the same course as Architectural Studies 493Z, 494Z.  Refer to the Architectural Studies listing for a course description.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493Z, 494Z.

ART HISTORY  411  ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL ROME  The changing urban layout of Rome in the course of two millennia from the city′s legendary founding in the 8th century BCE through the transfer of the papacy to France in 1309.  Individual buildings and construction campaigns and broader phases of urban growth will be placed in their political, ideological, social, and art-historical contexts.  This is the same course as Architectural Studies 493Q, 494Q.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493Q, 494Q.  J. Alchermes

ART HISTORY  412  CHRISTIAN PILGRIMAGE IN THE MIDDLE AGES:  RITUAL, ARCHITECTURE, AND URBANISM  Pilgrimage provided Christians throughout medieval Europe, western Asia and northern Africa with the extraordinary opportunity to detach themselves from their home communities, experience the exotic thrill (and often considerable danger) of long-distance travel, and worship in a "temporary community" at a holy site. Attention will focus on the pilgrimage shrines themselves, their locations in the larger urban or rural landscape, the rites and practices typically associated with pilgrims, and the relationships that link shrine/saint, pilgrims, and the organizers of the sacred cult observed at the pilgrimage center.  This is the same course as Architectural Studies 493R, 494R/Slavic Studies 412.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493C, 494C.  J. Alchermes

ART HISTORY  413  ISLAMIC ART:  WORD AND IMAGE  A problem-oriented exploration of the luxury arts and more quotidian objects created throughout the territories in which Muslims dominated during the millennium from the seventh through the seventeenth century.  Attention will focus on works in the newly re-installed galleries of Islamic Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

               Prerequisite:  Course 101 or 207.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493R, 494R.  J. Alchermes

ART HISTORY  420  GENDER IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE (1350- 1700):  ART,  LITERATURE AND SOCIETY  Exploration of issues of gender in early modern European art, literature, and society from the late middle ages to the 17th century.  Topics include courtly love vs. church culture, the humanist family and the gendered burgher republic, homoeroticism, mythological and historical rape, gendered landscape, Neoplatonism, courtesans and prostitution, gender in the Reformation, witches and other "powerful women", mercantilism and gender, the rise of pornography, the gender of art, music, and cultural leisure, Counter-Reformation Catholicism, and the gendering of the absolutist state.  Extensive readings in primary sources.

               Prerequisite:  Course 102.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493M, 494M.  R. Baldwin

ART HISTORY  430  ISSUES IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY ART  An exploration of trends in 19th century art with a focus on selected issues and movements.  Topics vary with each offering and may include Impressionism, visualizing the modern city, and representations of gender.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493A, 494A.  Staff

ART HISTORY  434  POST-IMPRESSIONISM AND SYMBOLISM:  EUROPEAN ART 1890-1910  Artistic shift inward away from modern reality.  Styles include Symbolism, Nabis, and Art Nouveau.  Major artists include Van Gogh, Gauguin, Munch, Cezanne, and Klimt.  Topics include Buddhism and eclectic spirituality, musical aesthetics, medievalism, interiors and interiority, sanctified women, femmes fatale, Japonism, primitivism, and landscape.

               Open to junior and senior majors.  R. Baldwin

ART HISTORY  440  ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY ART  An exploration of artistic trends of recent decades, with particular attention to the theoretical discourse that informs contemporary art.  Students will have the opportunity to participate in the organization of a small exhibition.

               Open to juniors and seniors with permission of the instructor.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493J, 494J.  Staff

ART HISTORY  450  BAD ART:  LOOKING BEYOND THE CANON  An exploration of the social construction of taste, and the art-historical boundaries between "good" and "bad" art.  How is an art object determined to be inside or outside the canon?  Art forms to be examined include kitsch, souvenirs, visionary and self-taught art, fakes, velvet paintings, lawn ornaments, and food art.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493P, 494P.  C. Steiner

ART HISTORY  451  FOOD IN ART, CULTURE, AND CINEMA  Seminar in the emerging field of food studies, exploring the representation of food and eating in visual culture from Medieval Europe to contemporary America.  Themes include authenticity, memory, technology, sexuality, and hierarchy as inscribed in the preparation, display, and consumption of food.  Films with food themes screened; historical meals prepared.

               Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493I, 494I; or the Freshman Seminar "Food in Art, Culture, and Cinema."  C. Steiner

ART HISTORY  452  AUTHENTICITY IN ART AND CULTURE  Drawing on classic and contemporary writings in art history, anthropology, cultural studies, and the philosophy of aesthetics, this seminar considers the notion of "authenticity."  Topics to be considered include:  the invention of tradition; imitations and simulacra; hybridity and the construction of the canon; the aesthetic status of fakes and forgeries; the role of authenticity in tourism and tourist art; and the art market and connoisseurship.  This is the same course as Anthropology 403.

               Prerequisite:  One course in art history or anthropology.  Open to juniors and seniors, with preference given to art history and anthropology majors.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493K, 494K.  C. Steiner

ART HISTORY  460  THE ARTS AND CRAFTS MOVEMENT IN AMERICA  The development of the Arts and Crafts movement in America from ca. 1860-1930.  After acquainting themselves with the movement’s European underpinnings, seminar students will explore the political, social, and cultural contexts of the diffusion of Arts and Crafts design in America.

           Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493V, 494V.  E. Morash

ART HISTORY  461  THE PRAIRIE SCHOOL  The Prairie School is an advanced undergraduate seminar that explores the development of the so-called Prairie School of architecture in the last decade of the nineteenth century.  Students will examine the style's relationship to the Arts and Crafts Movement, Chicago and the Midwest, trends in American domestic architecture, and modernism.  Leading protagonists, including Wright, Drummond, Elmslie, Mahony, Griffin, Perkins, and Purcell, will be considered in depth.  E. Morash

ART HISTORY  462  LE CORBUSIER AND POSTWAR ARCHITECTURE  An advanced undergraduate seminar that explores Le Corbusier's work during and following the Second World War.  Students will examine the architect's work in terms of executed designs, projects, writings, painting, and urbanism.  Particular attention will be paid to Le Corbusier's relationship to the development of major postwar trends in mass housing and material use.  E. Morash

ART HISTORY  463  LE CORBUSIER AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF MODERNIST ARCHITECTURE  An advanced undergraduate seminar focusing on Le Corbusier's seminal role in the foundation of the modern movement in architecture.  Students will examine both Le Corbusier's writings and architectural projects from the 1920s and 1930s.  Particular attention will be paid to the role played by media (magazines, books, film) in the dissemination of Le Corbusier's ideas and theories.

               Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493U, 494U.  E. Morash

ART HISTORY  464  FROM WASHINGTON′S MT VERNON TO ELVIS′S GRACELAND:  COLONIAL REVIVALS IN AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE  Successive packing and repackaging of America′s colonial past from 1850 to the present with attention to the various settings (international expositions, open-air museums, institutional buildings, domestic architecture) in which architects, builders, and their clients created mythical pasts to fit present needs. 

               Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493S, 494S.  A. Van Slyck

ART HISTORY  465  THE MUSEUM AS A BUILDING TYPE  This is the same course as Architectural Studies 493B, 494B.  Refer to the Architectural Studies listing for a course description.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493B, 494B.

ART HISTORY  466  THE ARCHITECTURE OF CONNECTICUT COLLEGE  This is the same course as Architectural Studies 493H, 494H.  Refer to the Architectural Studies listing for a course description.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493H, 494H.

ART HISTORY  467  NEW LONDON:  A CULTURAL LANDSCAPE APPROACH  This is the same course as Architectural Studies 493C, 494C.  Refer to the Architectural Studies listing for a course description.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art History 493D, 494D.

ART HISTORY  490  ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES PROJECT SEMINAR  This is the same course as Architectural Studies 490.  Refer to the Architectural Studies listing for a course description.

ART HISTORY  491, 492  INDIVIDUAL STUDY  Students who wish to undertake Individual Study must consult with an adviser and present a detailed proposal to the chair for approval by the department.  Rough drafts of proposals for fall semester projects are due on March 15 of the previous semester with final drafts due on April 1.  Rough drafts of proposals for spring semester projects are due on November 1 of the previous semester with final drafts due on November 15.  This is a designated Writing course.

ART HISTORY  496  MUSEUM STUDIES SENIOR PROJECT  Intended only for students completing a senior project in Museum Studies Certificate Program.  Weekly meetings will include group and individual advising; discussion of current events in the museum profession; and student presentations of research proposals, updates on work in progress, and final project outcomes.

               Prerequisite:  Permission of the instructor and one of the following:  Course 280, 281, or 283.  Enrollment limited to students in the museum studies certificate program.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  C. Steiner

ART HISTORY  497-498  HONORS STUDY  Students who wish to undertake Honors Study must consult with an adviser and present a detailed proposal to the chair for approval by the department.  Rough drafts of proposals are due on March 1 of the semester before the study is to begin.  Final drafts are due on April 1.  This is a designated Writing course.

Architectural Studies

Associate Professor Alchermes, director

The interdisciplinary study of architecture combines all the major areas of the College's liberal arts curriculum:  the arts, humanities, sciences, and social sciences.  Students may choose to develop a particular thematic focus through their selection of courses, or prepare for a professional career in architecture, architectural history, landscape architecture, urban planning, historic preservation, or another allied design field.  Each student completes an integrative project either as Individual or Honors Study, or through an internship.

Besides those courses listed below, others may be taken with prior approval at local colleges, at architecture summer schools, or as part of a study away program.  The nearby United States Coast Guard Academy offers an "Introduction to Engineering and Design" course open to Connecticut College students.  Consult the Director of Architectural Studies for more information.

The Major in Architectural Studies

The major consists of twelve courses:  four from the core group, seven electives, and a senior integrative project.  The art requirement may be waived by presentation and approval of an appropriate portfolio.  Note that the upper-level electives, especially in the sciences and social sciences, may require prerequisites not listed in the major.

CORE:

Students must take the following courses:

Art 101, 102, or 103;

Art History 101 and 103;

One seminar from the following list:

American Studies 493A/494A; Art History 410, 411, 412, 464, 465, 466, 467; Architectural Studies 493B/494B, 493C/494C, 493H/494H, 493Q/494Q, 493R/494R,  493Z/494Z; Environmental Studies 493G/494G; Government 493A/494A; Slavic Studies 412.

ELECTIVES:

Students must take seven courses (eight if they have funding for the integrative project) from at least three of the following four areas, at least four of which must be at the 200 level or above:

AREA I, ART AND DESIGN:

Architectural Studies 241, 261, 321, 342, 345; Art 200, 205, 206, 207, 208, 210, 218, 222, 225, 226, 241, 261, 310, 321, 342.

AREA II, ART AND ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY:

Freshman Seminars on architectural topics taught by the Art History Department; Art History 207, 211, 221, 270, 276, 278, 320, 370, 371, 372; Environmental Studies 320.

AREA III, HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE:

Anthropology 102, 202, 370, 383, 390, 406; Art History 296; Economics 247; French 403, 424; Philosophy 228, 251; Psychology 307, 320; Sociology 364.

AREA IV, MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE:

Computer Science 209; Environmental Studies 110; Mathematics 111, 112, 113; Physics 107, 108, 109, 110.

INTEGRATIVE PROJECT:

Students completing the integrative project as a non-funded internship must enroll in Architectural Studies 495 or 496.  The program requires students to make a formal proposal to the director of the Architectural Studies program in the semester that precedes the start of the integrative project.  Students must receive approval before beginning the integrative project.  A student may fulfill the integrative project with a CELS-funded internship (or one that is funded from another source), but will not also receive course credit toward the major for the experience.  In order to meet the basic requirement of the major (12 courses), a student with a funded internship must complete eight electives toward the major.

Students may propose to complete an individual project (Architectural Studies 490, or in exceptional circumstances 491) or Honors Thesis (497-498) to fulfill the integrative project requirement.  The program requires students to make a formal proposal to the director of the Architectural Studies program in the semester that precedes the start of the integrative project.  Students must receive approval before beginning the integrative project.

Adviser:  J. Alchermes

The Minor in Architectural Studies

The minor consists of a minimum of five courses, three of which must be at the 200 level or above.  From the core group choose Art 102 or 103, and at least one architectural history course.  From the elective group choose a minimum of three courses, with two from the same area.

Learning Goals in the Architectural Studies Major

Architectural Studies program embraces a broad understanding of architecture as inseparable from the cultural landscape - the intersection of natural landscapes with built forms and social life.  Its structure prompts majors to deepen their understanding of cultural landscape by integrating insights from a range of disciplinary perspectives. 

When they graduate, Architectural Studies majors will:

  • Be able to interpret individual buildings in light of their larger settings (building site, neighborhood, city, and even region), while also paying attention to the furniture and fittings that mediate the inhabitants' occupation of a given space.
  • Use a variety of disciplinary approaches to investigate the ways in which the cultural landscape shapes our sense of ourselves, our interactions with others, and our understanding of the wider world.
  • Be able to communicate effectively about architecture verbally and in writing, applying complex forms of analysis in oral presentations and essay-length papers using clear and concise prose.
  • Be able to design and execute a research project: define a question; employ appropriate technologies to locate pertinent primary and secondary sources; identify a suitable analytical method; and apply that method to write a well-argued, fully-documented interpretive paper.
  • Be able to contextualize their discipline-based knowledge and experience outside the college setting.

Courses

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  201  TECHNICAL WORKSHOP:  COMPUTER-AIDED DRAFTING  An introduction to the basics of Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD), with an emphasis on AutoCAD.  Skill development includes drawing, annotation, and plotting.

               Permission of the instructor is required, with priority given to students who are currently enrolled in Architectural Studies 241.  Two hours of credit, marked as pass/not passed.  Enrollment limited to 10 students.  Staff

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  231  THE INTERIORS OF CONNECTICUT COLLEGE  Through an examination of the interior architecture of Connecticut College, this course examines the spaces the College has constructed, used, modified, and renovated from its founding in 1911 to the present.  Students will discover why and how the campus looks the way it does today by conducting case studies utilizing the College Archives.  Students will develop proposals for interventions and create design recommendations and solutions.
               Prerequisite:  Art 101, 102, 103, or 200, or permission of the instructor.  This course is open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  E. Morash

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  241  ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN I:  CONVENTIONS, INVENTIONS, AND TRANSGRESSIONS  A critical introduction to architectural design and discourse through design exercises that incorporate reading, writing, sketching, and physical/digital modeling.  Conventions and constraints will serve not as limiting factors, but as sources of speculation and innovation.  Students are highly encouraged to take the entire digital media workshop series.  Students from outside the major are encouraged to enroll.

               Admission by permission of the program director.   Enrollment limited to 12 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 5.  S. Fan

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  243  SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE  An introduction to the principles and practice of sustainable architecture.  Course topics include vernacular adaptations to climate and available resources, the evolution of sustainable design and technology since the mid-twentieth century, current trends and new technology, ethical choices and dilemmas inherent in the building process, and impacts of government policies and regulations.  This is the same course as Environmental Studies 243.

               Enrollment limited to 24 students.  J. O′Riordan

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  261  LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE DESIGN STUDIO  Landscape architecture design studio that develops skills in describing, analyzing, and designing landscape spaces (gardens, parks, urban plazas).  This is the same course as Art 261.

               Prerequisite:  Art 102 or 103 and either Art History 103 or 270.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  Staff

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  293, 294  PRACTICUM IN ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  One or two hours of credit, to be determined by the department in advance, depending on the nature of the proposal and the amount of work involved.  Marked as pass/not passed.

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  321  HISTORY, PLACE, MEANING IN SITE/ART INTERVENTIONS  This is the same course as Art 321.  Refer to the Art listing for a course description.

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  327  EVIDENCE-BASED DESIGN:  INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES  A design seminar/workshop that teams students with backgrounds in psychology research methods with those trained in architectural design to collaborate on the redesign of an urban space in New London.

               Prerequisite:  Course 241, Psychology 202, or permission of the instructors.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  This is the same course as Psychology 327.  A. Devlin, S. Fan

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  342  ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II:  SELECTED TOPICS  Architecture design studio involving increasingly complex design problems and introducing students to AutoCAD.  Topics vary each semester and may include library design, preservation and adaptive reuse, "green" design, and housing.  May be repeated for credit.  This is the same course as Art 342.

               Eight hours of studio work.  Prerequisite:  Architectural Studies/Art 241 and Art History 103.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  J. O′Riordan

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  344  ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II:  "GREEN" ARCHITECTURE  Architecture design studio involving design problems similar in the level of complexity to those treated in Architectural Studies 342, but with an emphasis here on sustainability. This is the same course as Art 344.

                Eight hours of studio work.  Prerequisite: Architectural Studies/Art 241, Art History 103, and Architectural Studies 243.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  J. O′Riordan

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  346  HISTORIC PRESERVATION FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE  Using the College's historic prefabricated houses as case studies, this course will explore the development of the industrialized house, the principles and practices of historic preservation, and the intersection of preservation and sustainability.  Final projects may focus on the interpretation of the houses for the public and future sustainability measures.

               Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors; and to freshmen with the permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  D. Royalty

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  490  ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES PROJECT SEMINAR A seminar in research techniques and methodology intended for students completing the required integrative project in Architectural Studies in the form of an individual project.  Rough drafts of proposals are due on October 15 of the preceding semester, with final drafts due on November 15.  This is the same course as Art History 490.

               Open to senior majors in architectural studies, with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Offered second semester.  This is a designated Writing course.  E. Morash

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  493, 494  ADVANCED STUDY SEMINARS  Directed research on designated architectural topics, employing the methods of architectural history, architectural design, and historic preservation as complementary modes of architectural inquiry.

               One course in art history (unless otherwise noted).  Open to juniors and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This is a designated Writing course.

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  493B, 494B  THE MUSEUM AS A BUILDING TYPE  The museum as a building type, with a focus on public museums from the 18th century to the present.  Qualified students may complete a design project in lieu of a research paper.  This is the same course as Art History 465.  A. Van Slyck

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  493C, 494C  NEW LONDON:  A CULTURAL LANDSCAPE APPROACH  New London's architecture and urban spaces considered as ordinary places created through the interaction of local subcultures and national, dominant cultural values.  This is the same course as Art History 467.  A. Van Slyck

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  493H, 494H  THE ARCHITECTURE OF CONNECTICUT COLLEGE  In this in-depth study of the development of the Connecticut College campus from its founding to the present day, students will undertake extensive research in the college archives and interpret buildings and landscape features (extant and demolished) in light of changes in institutional priorities, pedagogical theories, and student demographics.  This is the same course as Art History 466.  A. Van Slyck

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  493Q, 494Q  ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL ROME  This is the same course as Art History 411.  Refer to the Art History listing for a course description.

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  493R, 494R  CHRISTIAN PILGRIMAGE IN THE MIDDLE AGES:  RITUAL, ARCHITECTURE, AND URBANISM  This is the same course as Art History/Slavic Studies 412.  Refer to the Art History listing for a course description. 

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  493Z, 494Z  ROMAN ARCHITECTURE  An in-depth investigation of building in ancient Rome and throughout the Roman world.  Areas of focus will include the links between Roman architecture and the building traditions of the Etruscans and Greeks, issues regarding design, function and construction techniques in public and domestic architecture, and the political and social aims of building patrons.  This is the same course as Art History 410.   J. Alchermes

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  491, 492  INDIVIDUAL STUDY  Proposals for advanced study are initiated by the student the semester before study will be done, in consultation with the faculty adviser and, if necessary, with an outside professional.

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  495, 496  INTERNSHIP  Students work 8-10 hours per week in a professional organization.  A proposal submitted in the previous semester outlines general tasks and special projects.

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES  497-498  HONORS STUDY