Chemistry



Professors:  Branchini, Ovaska, Zimmer; Assistant Professor:  Schneider; Senior Lecturers:  Fontneau, Ronau; Lecturer:  Vellucci; Professor Ching, chair

The Majors in Chemistry

The chemistry department offers four majors.  All majors consist of a core curriculum plus the prescribed electives.  The core courses and the optimum sequence for fulfilling them are:

CORE COURSES

Freshman year:          Courses 103, 104 or 107, 204

                                      Mathematics 112 (or a more advanced calculus course)

                                      Physics 109, 110

Sophomore year:       Courses 223, 224

                                      Physics 107, 108 (as an alternative to Physics 109, 110)

All students are advised to elect a computer course.  Students are strongly encouraged to elect individual study and research courses (Courses 229, 230, 391, 392, 491, 492, 497-498).  Students considering any of the department's programs should discuss the optimum sequence of the required courses with the department chair as soon as possible.  Note especially the alternating schedule of offerings for Courses 300, 307, 309, 316, 402 and 414.

The American Chemical Society Certified Major in Chemistry

The department is certified by the American Chemical Society (ACS) and offers a major approved by the ACS.  The ACS curriculum is widely recognized by graduate schools, industry, etc., to be a high standard of professional education.  To complete the ACS certified major, the following additional requirements must be met:  Mathematics 113 (or a more advanced calculus course); Courses 202, 214, 307, 309, 324, 401, 402, 414; two courses from among Courses 395, 396, 397, 398; and one course chosen from Courses 229, 230, 391, 392, 491, 492 or 497-498.  Course 202 not required for students with credit for Course 204.

Adviser:  S. Ching

The American Chemical Society Certified Major in Chemistry/Biochemistry

The department is certified by the ACS to offer a separate approved major in chemistry/biochemistry.  The advantages of the ACS certification are explained above.  To complete this program of study, the following courses in addition to the core requirements must be taken:  Mathematics 113 (or a more advanced calculus course); Courses 202, 214, 303, 304, 307, 309, 401; two courses from among Courses 395, 396, 397, 398; Biology 106, 206 (or 208), 309.  Course 202 not required for students with credit for Course 204.

Advisers:  B. Branchini and T. Schneider

The Major in Environmental Chemistry

To complete this program of study, the following courses in addition to the core requirements must be taken:  Mathematics 113 (or a more advanced calculus course); Courses 214, 316, 324, 414; two courses from Courses 395, 396, 397, 398; and one additional 300-or 400-level chemistry course with laboratory; Biology 105 and Government 260.

Adviser:  M. Zimmer

The Major in Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology

The Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology (BCMB) major is designed to complement existing programs in the biology, chemistry, and botany departments and to recognize the importance of the interdisciplinary nature of modern biochemistry, cellular and molecular biology.  To complete this major, the following courses in addition to the core requirements must be taken:  Chemistry 303, 304; Biology 106, 208; Biology 302 or 309; two semesters of seminar courses from Biology 293, 294 or Chemistry 395, 396, 397, 398; three electives, at least one from chemistry and one from biological sciences, from the following:  Biology 202, 302, 309, 325, 330; Botany 320; Chemistry 214, 307*, 309*, 401.  There is also an option for one elective to come from an additional list of courses** if individual study is also taken.  Students are highly encouraged to elect Individual Study and/or Honors Study from biology, botany, or chemistry.

*Mathematics 113 is a prerequisite for Chemistry 307 and Chemistry 309.

** Certain courses in the biological sciences and chemistry are also eligible elective courses if a 2- or 4-credit individual study course is also completed.  These eligible courses are any Biology 493, 494 or Botany 493, 494 course that focuses on biochemistry, cellular biology, or molecular biology; Biology 410, 414; Chemistry 300, 417B.  This option can only be exercised for one of the three BCMB electives.  The remaining two electives must include one course from chemistry and one course from the biological sciences.

Advisers:  P. Barnes, A. Bernhard, B. Branchini, D. Eastman, M. Grossel, S. Loomis, P. Owen, T. Schneider

The Minor in Chemistry

The minor consists of either Courses 103, 104 or 107, 204, Courses 223, 224 and two additional chemistry courses that include scheduled laboratories.  Students should be aware of the stated prerequisites for these courses.

Learning Goals in the Chemistry Major

  • Understand and be able to use the material presented in foundation and upper level courses in 4 out of 5 sub-disciplines of chemistry
    • Analytical Chemistry
    • Biochemistry
    • Inorganic Chemistry
    • Organic Chemistry
    • Physical Chemistry
  • Develop laboratory skills with a broad range of techniques in 4 of 5 major sub-disciplines as listed above.
  • Develop critical thinking in the sciences.
  • Develop skills for laboratory work, computational analysis, written and oral communication, and search/comprehension of the scientific literature.
  • Have a knowledge base with problem solving skills such as the ability to
    • Develop testable hypotheses
    • Design and execute experiments
    • Analyze data
  • Perform laboratory work safely and in an environmentally responsible way.
  • To take personal responsibility for learning and to develop a work ethic that includes perseverance and independence.
  • Foster enthusiasm and enjoyment of chemistry.  Encourage curiosity and develop confidence in their scientific abilities.

Courses

CHEMISTRY  101  MOLECULAR SCIENCE  Elementary chemical principles will be presented.  This basic knowledge will be used to cover topics of interest such as chemical aspects of chemotherapy, the greenhouse effect, global warming, environmental chemistry, detergent chemistry and medicinal chemistry.  Intended for non-science majors.  Students cannot receive credit for Course 101 if they have received credit for Course 103 or 107 or the equivalent courses taken elsewhere.

               Three lectures, no laboratory.  Enrollment limited to 60 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 1.  Staff

CHEMISTRY  103, 104  GENERAL CHEMISTRY  The nature and types of chemical reactions and the mass and energy relationships accompanying chemical changes will be emphasized in Course 103.  Equilibrium, kinetics and electrochemistry are the primary focus of Course 104.  The laboratory emphasizes basic techniques in quantitative and qualitative analysis.  Five credit hours each semester.  Students cannot receive credit for both Courses 103 and 107. Registration is also required in Chemistry 103L, 104L.

               Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory work; one hour recitation.  Chemistry 103 is prerequisite to 104.  Enrollment limited to 12 students per laboratory section.  Course 103 satisfies General Education Area 1.  S. Ching, M. Zimmer, V. Fontneau, M. Ronau, D. Vellucci, Staff

CHEMISTRY  103L, 104L  GENERAL CHEMISTRY LAB  Registration is also required in Chemistry 103, 104.

CHEMISTRY  107  ADVANCED GENERAL CHEMISTRY  Fundamental concepts of chemistry presented at an accelerated level.  Content includes atomic structure, chemical reactivity, energy relationships, reaction rates and equilibria.  Chemical principles reinforced with lecture demonstrations and examples of current scientific interest.  Students cannot receive credit for both Courses 103 and 107.  Registration is also required in Chemistry 107L.

               Three lectures; three hours laboratory work.  Recommended for students who have very good preparation in high school chemistry or who have a strong aptitude for science.  Prerequisite:  Permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 12 students per laboratory section.  Open to freshmen only.  This course satisfies General Education Area 1.  M. Zimmer, S. Ching, Staff

CHEMISTRY  107L  ADVANCED GENERAL CHEMISTRY LAB  Registration is also required in Chemistry 107.

CHEMISTRY  202  PRINCIPLES OF INORGANIC CHEMISTRY  Basic principles of inorganic chemistry.  Topics include descriptive inorganic chemistry, structure and bonding, transition metal coordination chemistry, reaction mechanisms, solid state chemistry, electron transfer processes and bioinorganic chemistry.

               Three lectures, no laboratory.  Prerequisite:  Course 104 or permission of the instructor.  M. Zimmer, S. Ching

CHEMISTRY  204  INORGANIC CHEMISTRY  Basic principles of inorganic chemistry.  Topics include descriptive inorganic chemistry, structure and bonding, transition metal coordination chemistry, reaction mechanisms, solid state chemistry, electron transfer processes and bioinorganic chemistry.  The laboratory emphasizes synthetic, structural and spectroscopic properties of inorganic compounds.  Five credit hours.  Registration is also required in Chemistry 204L.

               Three lectures, three hours laboratory work.  Prerequisite:  Course 107 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 12 students per laboratory section.  Staff

CHEMISTRY  204L  INORGANIC CHEMISTRY LAB  Registration is also required in Chemistry 204.

CHEMISTRY  214  ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY  Fundamentals of analytical chemistry.  Introduction to sample preparation, separation techniques, volumetric, electrochemical and spectroscopic methods.  Laboratory work combines classical and instrumental methods of analysis.

               Three hours lecture; four hours laboratory work.  Prerequisite:  Course 104 or 204.  Enrollment limited to 12 students per laboratory section. Staff

CHEMISTRY  223, 224  ORGANIC CHEMISTRY  Introduction to the chemistry of carbon compounds, emphasizing the structure, reactivity and mechanisms of reactions for the important functional group classes.  Macro- and microscale laboratory work includes basic techniques, representative syntheses with instrumental methods of characterization and identification.  Five credit hours each semester.  Registration is also required in Chemistry 223L, 224L.

               Three lectures; three hours laboratory work; one hour recitation.  Prerequisite:  Course 104 or 204.  Course 223 is prerequisite to 224.  Enrollment limited to 12 students per laboratory section.  B. Branchini, T. Ovaska, M. Ronau, D. Vellucci

CHEMISTRY  223L, 224L  ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LAB  Registration is also required in Chemistry 223, 224.

CHEMISTRY  300  MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY  The chemical, physical and biological principles involved in the discovery, design, synthesis and assessment of several representative classes of medicinal agents; case histories of drug design and development.

               Three lectures, no laboratory.  Prerequisite:  Courses 223, 224.  Course 224 may be taken concurrently.  This course is taught by adjunct members of the faculty employed by Pfizer, Inc., and is coordinated by T. Ovaska.  Offered in 2012-2013 and in alternate years.  Adjunct Staff

CHEMISTRY  303, 304  BIOCHEMISTRY  Course 303 deals primarily with biomolecules, discussing enzyme kinetics and the structure and function of amino acids, proteins, saccharides, lipids, vitamins and coenzymes.  Course 304 covers biochemical energetics, intermediary metabolism, photosynthesis and the transcription of DNA.  Laboratory illustrates the properties of biological molecules and introduces classical and modern biochemical techniques.  Registration is also required in Chemistry 303L, 304L.

               Three lectures, three hours laboratory.  Prerequisite:  Course 224.  Course 303 is a prerequisite to Course 304.  Instructor approval is required for enrollment in Course 304.  Enrollment limited to 12 students per laboratory section.  Course 304 is a designated Writing course.  T. Schneider, V. Fontneau, D. Vellucci

CHEMISTRY  303L, 304L  BIOCHEMISTRY LAB  Registration is also required in Chemistry 303, 304.

CHEMISTRY  307  CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS  Development of chemical thermodynamics and its applications to a variety of chemical systems such as phase and reaction equilibria.  Correlation of experimental observations with theoretical models emphasized.  Laboratory focus on the acquisition and interpretation of data.

               Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory work.  Prerequisite:  Course 224, Mathematics 113 and Physics 108.  Physics majors who have completed Chemistry 104 or 204 may substitute a 200-level physics course for Course 224.  Enrollment limited to 12 students per laboratory section.  Offered first semester 2013-2014 and in alternate years.  K. Johnson

CHEMISTRY  309  ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS  An introduction to quantum mechanics and chemical bonding; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; statistical thermodynamics; the study of chemical reaction dynamics; and the study of macromolecules.

               Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.  Prerequisite:  Course 224, Mathematics 113, Physics 108.  Physics majors who have completed Chemistry 104 or 204 may substitute a 200-level physics course for 224.  Enrollment limited to 12 students per laboratory section.  Offered first semester 2012-2013 and in alternate years.  Staff

CHEMISTRY  316  ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY  Atmospheric chemistry, tropospheric chemistry and stratospheric ozone will be covered.  The course also deals with acid rain, its sources, chemistry and effects; chlorinated organic compounds; lead and mercury poisoning; natural waters; drinking water; and genetic damage.

               Three lectures, no laboratory.  Prerequisite:  Courses 223 and 224.  Course 224 may be taken concurrently.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  Offered second semester 2013-2014 and in alternate years.  M. Zimmer

CHEMISTRY  324  BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY  A one-semester course covering three general areas of biochemistry:  biological structures and interactions that stabilize biomolecules; biological reactions; and biological equilibria and energetics.  This course is primarily intended for ACS Chemistry or Environmental Chemistry majors and does not satisfy any of the requirements for majors in ACS Biochemistry or Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology.  Students who have taken Course 303 or its equivalent elsewhere cannot receive credit for Course 324.

               Three lectures, no laboratory.  Prerequisite:  Course 224 or permission of the instructor.  Offered second semester.  B. Branchini

CHEMISTRY  395, 396, 397, 398  CHEMISTRY SEMINAR SERIES  Lectures and discussions on current research in chemistry.  Presentations by visiting scientists, Connecticut College faculty and student researchers.  One hour of credit, marked as pass/not passed.

               Prerequisite:  Course 101 or 103 or 107.  Biweekly meetings throughout the semester.  These courses may be taken for a maximum of four credits.  Offered every semester.  Staff

CHEMISTRY  401  ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPIC METHODS  Lecture topics include infrared, ultraviolet, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy as used in the identification of organic compounds.  Laboratory work consists of several syntheses, including the preparation of inorganic compounds, and involves techniques for handling reactive materials.  Reactions are monitored by chromatographic methods and product structures are confirmed by spectroscopic methods.

               Three hours lecture; four hours laboratory.  Prerequisite:  Course 224.  Enrollment limited to 8 students per laboratory section.  B. Branchini

CHEMISTRY  402  ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY  Inorganic synthetic methods are used to illustrate descriptive chemistry of the elements and their compounds.  Techniques include dry box, inert atmosphere and vacuum line manipulations; solid state synthesis; and computational analysis.  Physical measurements include kinetic and equilibrium analysis, spectroscopic methods, magnetic susceptibility, conductivity and voltammetry.  Lectures discuss the chemistry of the synthesized compounds and the principles underlying their characterization.

               Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory work.  Prerequisite:  Course 309, which may be taken concurrently, or permission of the instructor.  Course 202 (or 204) is recommended.  Enrollment limited to 12 students per laboratory section.  Offered second semester 2013-2014 and in alternate years.  This is a designated Writing course.  S. Ching, Staff

CHEMISTRY  414  INSTRUMENTAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS  A survey of the various instrumental methods employed in modern chemical analysis and research.  Chemical and physical phenomena are related to the design and operating principles of scientific instruments.  Practical applications to qualitative, quantitative and structural analysis are examined.  Major topics include spectroscopic techniques, electroanalytical chemistry and chromatography.

               Two lectures; four hours laboratory work.  Prerequisite:  Course 214, 224, 307 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 12 students per laboratory section.  Offered second semester 2012-2013 and in alternate years.  S. Ching and Staff

CHEMISTRY  417  ADVANCED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY  Topics will be chosen from bioinorganic chemistry, bioorganic chemistry, protein structure and function, and organic synthesis.

               Three hours lecture; no laboratory.  Permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  Offered second semester.  Staff

CHEMISTRY  417A  ORGANIC SYNTHESIS

CHEMISTRY  417B  PROTEIN STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

Individual Study and Research Courses

CHEMISTRY  229, 230  METHODS OF CHEMICAL RESEARCH  Five hours per week of laboratory research supervised by a faculty member.  Some library research may also be included.  A written summary is required.  May not be taken concurrently with Courses 391, 392, 491, 492 or 497-498.  Two hours of credit.

               Offered by individual arrangement.  Students must submit a brief description of the proposed project for required department approval at registration.

CHEMISTRY  391, 392  INDIVIDUAL STUDY  For qualified students this course offers the opportunity for advanced work in areas beyond the basic curriculum in chemistry.  A written summary is required.  Two options:

a.  Tutorial Individual Study:  Reading and discussion of topics in chemistry.

b.  An independent laboratory or research project carried out under the direction of a faculty member.  Ten hours per week in the laboratory is expected.

               Offered by individual arrangement.  Students must submit a brief description of the proposed project for required department approval at registration.

CHEMISTRY  491, 492  ADVANCED INDIVIDUAL STUDY  For students meeting the prerequisites, this course offers the opportunity for advanced work in areas beyond the basic curriculum in chemistry.  A written summary is required.  Two options:

a.  Tutorial Individual Study:  Reading and discussion of topics in chemistry.

b.  An independent laboratory or research project carried out under the direction of a faculty member.  Ten hours per week in the laboratory is expected.

               Offered by individual arrangement.  Students must submit a brief project proposal for department approval at registration.  Prerequisite:  Courses 391, 392 or permission of the instructor.

CHEMISTRY  497-498  HONORS STUDY