College Courses



The category College Courses was created by the faculty to provide opportunities for study that reach across or beyond the bounds of existing departments and interdepartmental programs.  College Courses carry normal academic credit and may be elected by any eligible student.

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  104  TIME-BASED DIGITAL MEDIA  This is the same course as Art 104.  Refer to the Art listing for a course description.

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  110  INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA AND DIGITAL ART  An introduction to concepts, theories, and methodologies of new media; to issues of identity/corporeality, race, and gender within networked and virtual environments; and to a diverse array of social, artistic, and political practices using digital technology.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Staff

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  201  TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  An examination of the definitions and intersections of arts and technology, along with their historical and contemporary impact.  Critical analysis of the influence of available technology on artists, artistic styles, trends, materials, and philosophy, as well as the ways in which artistic expression helps drive technological innovation.  Students will work collaboratively on creative projects in weekly labs.

              Only open to students enrolled in the Ammerman Certificate program.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Ammerman Center Faculty

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  203  ELECTROACOUSTIC MUSIC I/SOUND DESIGN  This is the same course as Music 203.  Refer to the Music listing for a course description.

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  209  GRAPHICS AND VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS  This is the same course as Computer Science 309.  Refer to the Computer Science listing for a course description.

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  213  SOUND ART  This is the same course as Art 213.  Refer to the Art listing for a course description.

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  214  VIDEO INSTALLATION  This is the same course as Art 214.  Refer to the Art listing for a course description.

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  217  INTERACTIVE ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT  This is the same course at Computer Science 217.  Refer to the Computer Science listing for a course description.

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  218  MULTIMEDIA  This is the same course as Computer Science 218.  Refer to the Computer Science listing for a course description.

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  230  TECHNE:  PROJECTS IN PERFORMANCE AND TECHNOLOGY  This is the same course as Theater 230.  Refer to the Theater listing for a course description.

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  244  EXPLORING LIGHT AND SHADOW:  LIGHTING DESIGN FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS  This is the same course as Dance/Theater 244.  Refer to the Theater listing for a course description.

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  302  DESIGNING VISUAL INFORMATION  This is the same course as Art 302.  Refer to the Art listing for a course description.

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  304  ELECTROACOUSTIC MUSIC II  This is the same course as Music 304.  Refer to the Music listing for a course description.

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  305  EXPERIMENTAL 3D  This is the same course as Art 305.  Refer to the Art listing for a course description.

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  308  TECHNE/TECHNOLOGY:  INVESTIGATIONS IN 3D  This is the same course as Art 308.  Refer to the Art listing for a course description. 

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  312  DIGITAL SOUND PROCESSING  This is the same course as Computer Science 312.  Refer to the Computer Science listing for a course description.

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  401, 402  SENIOR SEMINAR IN ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  Presentations, discussions, and exercises related to issues, analyses, and critical evaluation of works that represent the interaction of arts and technology.  Focus on contemporary works and senior projects.  Students will develop informal and formal oral presentations, as well as digital documentation of their senior projects.  Open to seniors enrolled in the Ammerman Center's certificate program.  One semester-hour credit each semester (pass/not passed).

               Prerequisite:  Course 401 is prerequisite for Course 402.  Students must be concurrently enrolled in an individual study and must have completed all other required courses for the certificate program.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Ammerman Center Faculty

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  491, 492  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY  499  INDIVIDUAL STUDY  Eight hours credit.

COMMUNITY ACTION  201  PUBLIC POLICY AND SOCIAL ETHICS  Examination of tensions among individual wants, community needs and citizens′ responsibilities, and how these tensions are affected by cultural, economic and social arrangements as well as globalization forces.  Analysis of social ethics, and commitment to universal satisfaction of basic needs, reduction of poverty and inequality.  Case studies of programs, related policies and their outcomes.

               Only open to students enrolled in the Holleran Center′s Certificate Program in Community Action.  Concurrent enrollment in Community Action 201A required.  Staff

COMMUNITY ACTION  201A  PICA:  COMMUNITY LEARNING SEMINAR  Students will develop skills in community participation, conflict negotiation, and leadership through classroom exercises, discussions, and community work.  Students will engage in service learning partnerships with New London community organizations.  A variety of partnership opportunities will be available.  Two credit hours, four hours once a week.

               Only open to students enrolled in the Holleran Center′s Certificate Program in Community Action.  Concurrent enrollment in Community Action 201 required.  Holleran Center Faculty

COMMUNITY ACTION  301, 302  JUNIOR COMMUNITY LEARNING SEMINAR  In this course, Holleran Center Program in Community Action (PICA) students will further develop their knowledge and skills in community action.  Students will engage in a supervised service-learning or action research project in the local community.  This course is offered both semesters; PICA juniors must participate for at least one.  Two credit hours.  This course may be repeated for credit once.

               Prerequisite:  Community Action 201 and 201A, or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 15 students.  Staff

COMMUNITY ACTION  401, 402  SENIOR SEMINAR IN COMMUNITY ACTION AND PUBLIC POLICY  This course provides Holleran Center Program in Community Action (PICA) students with an opportunity to discuss and integrate their educational experiences.  Students will reflect on summer internship experiences, consolidate learning across coursework, internship, community learning, skills workshops, and the senior project, and develop effective oral and written presentations.  One credit hour, marked as pass/not passed.

               Prerequisite:  Community Action 301 or 302 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Staff

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  165 AFRO-CARIBBEAN DANCE  This is the same course as Dance 165.  Refer to the Dance listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  201  INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN STUDIES  This is the same course as American Studies 201K/Religious Studies 201.  Refer to the American Studies listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  206  THEORIZING RACE AND ETHNICITY  This is the same course as American Studies 206/History 209.  Refer to the American Studies listing for a course description. 

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  206f  THEORIZING RACE AND ETHNICITY  This is the same course as American Studies 206f/History 209f.  Refer to the American Studies listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  215  POLITICS AND CULTURE IN THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1945  This is the same course as American Studies/History 215.  Refer to the History listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  219 REVOLUTIONS IN LATIN AMERICA  This is the same course as History 219.  Refer to the History listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  220  ALTERNATIVE MODERNITY AND INDIGENOUS POETICS  This is the same course as Environmental Studies/East Asian Studies 220.  Refer to the East Asian Studies listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  223  ETHNIC AND RACE RELATIONS  This is the same course as Sociology 223.  Refer to the Sociology listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  224  TRANSNATIONAL WOMEN'S MOVEMENT  This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 224.  Refer to the Gender and Women′s Studies listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  225  AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY 1865-PRESENT  This is the same course as American Studies/History 225.  Refer to the History listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  227  AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY 1619-1865  This is the same course as American Studies/History 227.  Refer to the History listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  252  SOCIAL JUSTICE AND ENVIRONMENT This is the same course as Environmental Studies/Gender and Women's Studies/History 252.  Refer to the History listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  252f  SOCIAL JUSTICE AND ENVIRONMENT  This is the same course as History 252F.  Refer to the History listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  253  NO HOMELAND IS FREE:  CHINESE AMERICAN LITERATURE  This is the same course as American Studies/East Asian Studies/English 253.  Refer to the East Asian Studies listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  254  RELIGION AND THE SPIRIT OF POLITICS  This is the same course as Religious Studies 254.  Refer to the Religious Studies listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  255  SOUTH ASIA IN THE POSTCOLONIAL WORLD  This is the same course as History 255.  Refer to the History listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  256  RELIGION AND PUBLIC LIFE  This is the same course as American Studies/Religious Studies 255.  Refer to the Religious Studies listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  257  LATINOS IN THE UNITED STATES  This is the same course as American Studies/History 257.  Refer to the History listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  259  LOVE AND JUSTICE  This is the same course as Religious Studies 259.  Refer to the Religious Studies listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  265  AFRO-CARIBBEAN DANCE  This is the same course as Dance 265.  Refer to the Dance listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  310  RACIAL IDENTITY IN AMERICA  This is the same course as Sociology 310.  Refer to the Sociology listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  312  FEMINIST SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS  This is the same course as Anthropology/Gender and Women′s Studies 312.  Refer to the Gender and Women′s Studies listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  314  FOREIGN BODIES FORBIDDEN SEXUALITIES IN AFRICA AND THE CARIBBEAN  This is the same course as French/Gender and Women′s Studies 314.  Refer to the French Department listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  318  LATIN NATION:  EXPRESSIONS OF U.S. LATINO IDENTITIES IN THE ARTS AND POPULAR CULTURE  This is a joint-listed course with Hispanic Studies 318.  Refer to the Hispanic Studies listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  326  THRILLS, CHILLS, AND TEARS:  BLACK GENRE FICTION  This is the same course as English/Gender and Women’s Studies 326.  Refer to the English listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  335  CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY  This is the same course as Psychology 335.  Refer to the Psychology listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  336  BLACK WOMEN IN PRINT AND ON SCREEN  This is the same course as American Studies 335/English 355/Film Studies/Gender and Women's Studies 335.  Refer to the English listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  344  CROSSING THE SEA:  TRANSATLANTIC DIALOGUE BETWEEN SPAIN AND THE AMERICAS  This is the same course as Hispanic Studies/History 344.  Refer to the Hispanic Studies or History listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  350  EDUCATION AND THE REVOLUTIONARY PROJECT IN LATIN AMERICA  This is the same course as American Studies/Education/Gender and Women′s Studies 350.  Refer to the Education listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  356  IMAGINING OTHERNESS IN VISUAL CULTURE  This is the same course as Anthropology/Art History 356.  Refer to the Art History listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  393, 394  ADVANCED RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES  This course is designed for fellows associated with the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity who participate in a student-led seminar supervised by the director of the CCSRE, work as liaisons to different centers and programs at the College (e.g., Unity House, LGBTQ Resource Center, Holleran Center), or in the community (e.g., Centro de la Comunidad), or create student-designed projects for the CCSRE.  Two hours of credit, marked as pass/not passed.  The course may be repeated for a total of eight credits.

               Prerequisite:  Permission of the director of CCSRE.  L. Garofalo

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  393G, 394G  ADVANCED RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES  This course is designed for students interested in expanding their knowledge of social justice issues and gaining the skills to develop and lead diversity education programs and initiatives on campus.  The course will introduce students to concepts relevant for leading conversations across various diversity issues and will equip students with facilitation, programming, and presentation skills to implement new educational programming.  This is a 2 credit course marked as pass/not passed.

               Prerequisite:  Permission of the director of CCSRE.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  E. Garcia

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  407  LA CARAÏBE FRANCOPHONE HIER ET AUJOURD′HUI (In French)  This is the same course as French 407.  Refer to the French listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  419  PUNISHMENT AND SOCIETY  This is the same course as Sociology 419.  Refer to the Sociology listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  420  THE WOMAN′S BODY IN AFRICAN LITERATURE AND CINEMA (In French)  This is the same course as French/Gender and Women′s Studies 420.  Refer to the French listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  422  MIGRANT WRITERS IN ITALY (In Italian)  This is the same course as Italian 422.  Refer to the Italian listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  424  GENOCIDE AND RESISTANCE:  EXAMINING THE NATIVE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE THROUGH PARTICIPATORY ACTION RESEARCH  This is the same course as Sociology 424.  Refer to the Sociology listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  450  LATIN AMERICAN IMMIGRATION  This is the same course as American Studies/History 450.  Refer to the History listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  450f  LATIN AMERICAN IMMIGRATION  This is the same course as History 450f.  Refer to the History listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  458  SOUTH OF CANADA IS THE MASON-DIXON LINE:  THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT IN THE NORTH, 1925-1975  This is the same course as American Studies/History 458.  Refer to the History listing for a course description.

COMPARATIVE RACE AND ETHNICITY  495  SENIOR INTEGRATIVE SEMINAR ON FULL PARTICIPATION AND THE LIBERAL ARTS  This is the same course as American Studies/Religious Studies 495/Gender and Women's Studies 490.  Refer to the Religious Studies listing for a course description.

HEBREW  101, 102  ELEMENTARY HEBREW  Introduction to the fundamentals of classical Hebrew, developing facility in both biblical texts and modern spoken language.

               Prerequisite:  Course 101 is prerequisite for 102.  Staff

HEBREW  201  INTERMEDIATE HEBREW I  Reading and discussion of selected works in Hebrew.  Designed to increase proficiency across the wide spectrum from biblical to medieval literature, with emphasis on grammatical precision and vocabulary development in reading, writing, and oral expression.

               Prerequisite:  Four years of Hebrew at entrance or Hebrew 102.  Offered in alternate years.  Staff

HEBREW  202  INTERMEDIATE HEBREW II  Reading and discussion of selected works in Hebrew.  Designed to increase proficiency across the wide spectrum from medieval to modern literature, with emphasis on grammatical precision and vocabulary development in reading, writing, and oral expression.

               Prerequisite:  Hebrew 201.  Offered in alternate years.  Staff

HEBREW  291, 292  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

HUMANITIES  258  MODERNISMS  A cross-cultural examination of Modernism as an international cultural movement.  Topics may include French Symbolism, German Expressionism, Russian Futurism, and Spanish Surrealism.  Core concepts explored throughout the course include changing attitudes toward language, subjectivity, temporality, and new artistic forms.

               Students majoring in Slavic Studies, German Studies or Hispanic Studies may count the course toward the major, with the approval of the appropriate department chairperson, providing they complete relevant reading and writing assignments in the language.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  A. Lanoux and Team Taught

INTERDISCIPLINARY  491, 492  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

INTERDISCIPLINARY  497-498  HONORS STUDY

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES  201  PERSPECTIVES ON MODERN GLOBAL SOCIETY  The origins and dynamics of modern global society and some of the material and spiritual challenges that confront it.

               Open only to students in the CISLA certificate program.  This is a designated Writing course.  M. Forster

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES  401  NEW PERSPECTIVES ON MODERN GLOBAL SOCIETY  A synthesis of information, technology, theory, practical experience and ethical debate related to themes selected by the participants.  Two credit hours, marked as pass/not passed.

               Open only to students in the CISLA certificate program.  M. Forster

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES  491, 492  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

INTERNSHIP  294  FIELD WORK:  CELS INTERNSHIP PROGRAM  Supervised practical training in various fields.  Enrollment in the course is contingent upon successfully obtaining an internship approved by the Director of Funded Internships and a faculty member.  Prior to the internship, students must find a faculty sponsor who will determine academic requirements and evaluate completed work.  The internship should be related to the practical application of the academic discipline of the sponsoring faculty member.  The internship should consist of a minimum of 100 hours of practical training with on-site supervision.  The on-site supervisor will be required to verify completion of the internship hours and will be asked to submit an evaluation to the faculty sponsor.  One hour of credit, marked as pass/not passed.

               This course may be repeated for credit.  For restrictions on the number of one-credit courses that can be applied toward the minimum degree requirements, see page 154 of the undergraduate catalog.  Please note that this course does not meet the requirement of Curricular Practical Training (CPT) for F-1 students.

LIBERAL ARTS  201  ROMAN ORIGINS OF THE LIBERAL ARTS TRADITION  A study of the origins of the liberal arts in republican Rome and their transformation in the Renaissance.

               Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors or by permission of the instructor.  This course is taught in SATA programs only.  R. Proctor

MUSEUM STUDIES  491, 492  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

SOPHOMORE RESEARCH SEMINAR  299  These seminars are designed to prepare students from a variety of disciplines for independent creative and scholarly work in the humanities and the arts.  Courses will foster in students the ability to design a research project and to develop a research proposal.  Students are encouraged to use these skills to take advantage of other opportunities offered at the College, such as applying to one of the College′s interdisciplinary centers with a senior integrative project or developing a proposal for a senior honors thesis.  Students in these courses are eligible to apply for a paid research internship in the summer after the sophomore year.

SOPHOMORE RESEARCH SEMINAR  299A  CASES AND HISTORY OF EQUALITY  Throughout history, egalitarian values and hierarchy have motivated individuals and societies to create or tear down economic, social, and political systems.  Employing various disciplines and modes of human expression, this course explores equality both as an ideal and a practice.  Students will complete research projects on some aspect of equality, inequality, or justice.  This course may include an optional section that will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Spanish.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  This is the same course as History 299.

               Open to all sophomores with permission of the instructor.  This course may count towards the history major on a case-by-case basis, depending on whether the research project is historical.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  L. Garofalo

SOPHOMORE RESEARCH SEMINAR  29Af  CASES AND HISTORY OF EQUALITY (In Spanish)  This optional section will meet for additional hour each week to discuss supplemental texts in Spanish.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing Sophomore Research Seminar 29Af must concurrently register for Sophomore Research Seminar 299A or History 299.  L. Garofalo 

SOPHOMORE RESEARCH SEMINAR  299B  THE IDEAL OF EQUALITY  We shall explore, historically and analytically, the ideal of equality,  asking whether we should believe in it and what a commitment to equality would imply from legal, political, economic, and interpersonal perspectives.  This is the same course as Philosophy 299.

               Open to all sophomores with permission of the instructor.  This course counts towards the philosophy major.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 6 and is a designated Writing course.  L. Vogel

SOPHOMORE RESEARCH SEMINAR  299C  ART OF PROTEST:  OCCUPY  _____  What do you believe in?  What cause or conviction would move you to "occupy?"  This course asks students to investigate their answers to these provocative questions and to research how others have done so, with a particular focus on the role of art in protest.  How can art "translate" a political moment into a political/artistic icon?  The course culminates in final projects in which the students will give creative/scholarly voice to their newly found perspectives.  This is the same course as Theater 299.

               Open to all sophomores with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 5.  D. Jaffe

SOPHOMORE RESEARCH SEMINAR  299D  SECRECY:  POWER, PRIVILEGE, AND THE INVISIBLE  What is the role of secrecy in controlling power and marking boundaries of knowledge?  Reading across a broad range of fields, we will explore practices of concealment through different historical and cultural contexts.  Topics include theories of secrecy, secret societies, confession, taboo, covert discourses of sexuality, and visual cultures of invisibility.  This is the same course as Anthropology/Art History 299.

               Open to all sophomores with permission of the instructor.  This course is taught at the same time as Art 299/Sophomore Research Seminar 299E to allow for collaborative work between the two classes.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  C.B. Steiner

SOPHOMORE RESEARCH SEMINAR  299E  (UNDER)COVER (OVER)SEEN:  VISIONING THE (IN)VISIBLE  What does it mean to do research in the creative process of art?  How do artists in any discipline mine a subject, unpack what is seen, or tease out hidden meanings to express a point of view or visual representation?  How can an artwork open up new fields of vision without illustrating?  This course will address the subject of "Power, Privilege, and the Invisible" to examine a variety of research strategies that artists, performers, and designers utilize in the creative process.  Students will experiment with material, form, and image in both real and imagined work.  This is the same course as Art 299.

               Open to all sophomores with permission of the instructor.  This course is taught at the same time as Art History/Anthropology 299/Sophomore Research Seminar 299D to allow for collaborative work between the two classes.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  D. Pelletier

SOPHOMORE RESEARCH SEMINAR  299F  ARCHIVE FEVER  What is an archive, and how do we use it?  What do we keep in archives, and what do we burn?  This course will introduce students to archival research.  We will learn to navigate search engines and reading-room protocols, explore literary representations of archives, and conduct original research.  This is the same course as English 299.

               Open to all sophomores with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  L. Perkins Wilder

SOPHOMORE RESEARCH SEMINAR  299G  INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH  Individual research project for students who have completed a sophomore research seminar and Mellon-funded summer research internship.  This is the same course as Art/English/History/Theater 293.  Two credit hours.  J. Rivkin

SUSTAINABILITY  293  APPLICATIONS OF SUSTAINABILITY  This course is designed for fellows associated with the Office of Sustainability who participate in a student-led seminar, work as liaisons to different centers and programs at the College or in the community, or create student-designed projects.  Two or four hours of credit, marked as pass/not passed.  The course may be repeated for a total of four credits.

               Prerequisite:  Permission of the directors of the Office of Sustainability.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  C. Jones, J. Stoffel

SUSTAINABILITY  393  ADVANCED APPLICATIONS OF SUSTAINABILITY  This course is designed for fellows associated with the Office of Sustainability who participate in a student-led seminar, work as liaisons to different centers and programs at the College or in the community, or create student-designed projects.  Two or four hours of credit, marked as pass/not passed.  The course may be repeated for a total of four credits.

               Prerequisite:  Four credits of Course 293, and permission of the directors of the Office of Sustainability.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  C. Jones, J. Stoffel