East Asian Languages and Cultures



Associate Professor:  Huang (Chinese); Assistant Professors:  Harb (Japanese), Watanabe (Japanese); Senior Lecturer:  King (Chinese) Chinese coordinator; Senior Lecturer Kobayashi (Japanese) Japanese coordinator; Associate Professor:  Dooling (Chinese) chair

The Major in East Asian Studies

The major consists of at least 11 courses.  The foundation course East Asian Studies 101 should be taken as early as possible and normally no later than the end of the sophomore year.  Students must choose to concentrate on either China or Japan.  Students majoring in East Asian Studies may be eligible for department certification in Chinese or Japanese language proficiency.

China Concentration:  Majors concentrating on China must take East Asian Studies 101; a minimum of four semesters of Chinese language courses; one departmental Chinese literary or cultural studies course at or above the 200 level; one Chinese history course; one transnational/transcultural course; one East Asian Studies senior seminar or, with departmental permission, two 300- or 400-level seminar courses on China and/or Japan; one China elective; and one departmental Japan elective.

Japan Concentration:  Majors concentrating on Japan must take East Asian Studies 101; a minimum of four semesters of Japanese language courses; one departmental Japanese literary or cultural studies course at or above the 200 level; one Japanese history course; one transnational/transcultural course; one East Asian Studies senior seminar or, with departmental permission, two 300- or 400-level seminar courses on Japan and/or China; one Japan elective; and one departmental China elective.

CORE COURSE

    East Asian Studies 101

LANGUAGE

    China:     Chinese 101, 102, 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402, 403, 404
    Japan:     Japanese 101, 102, 201, 202, 301, 400A, 400B, 400C, 400D

LITERATURE OR CULTURE

    China:     China-related courses offered by East Asian Languages and Cultures
    Japan:     Japan-related courses offered by East Asian Languages and Cultures

TRANSNATIONAL/TRANSCULTURAL COURSE

    East Asian Studies:  202, 230, 253, 357, 377

 HISTORY

    China:  Chinese history courses
    Japan:  Japanese history courses

 SENIOR SEMINAR

    East Asian Studies 493B, 494B, 493C, 494C, 493D, 494D

ELECTIVES

    China:  Chinese courses, China-related History courses, and China-related courses cross-listed with East Asian Studies

    Japan:  Japanese courses, Japan-related History courses, and Japan-related courses cross-listed with East Asian Studies.

A Freshman Seminar taught by East Asian Languages and Cultures faculty

The Minor in East Asian Studies

The minor consists of six or more courses:  East Asian Studies 101; four semesters of Chinese or Japanese language courses; and at least one additional course listed under the major in East Asian Studies at or above the 200 level.

Learning Goals in the East Asian Studies Major

The major in EALC is dynamic, interdisciplinary and international insofar as it integrates extensive language study, cultural and literary analysis through requirements as well as electives.  It has two concentrations:  China Concentration and Japan Concentration.  It requires students to develop critical reading, thinking, researching and writing abilities and prepares students for a wide range of future career opportunities relating to East Asia.

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY IN CHINESE/JAPANESE
All majors must complete at least four semesters of the Chinese/Japanese language sequence at the appropriate levels.  Majors who have received a grade of B+ or above in two 400-level Chinese/Japanese courses in the department and have been rated Intermediate High or above on the ACTFL OPI scale internally by the end of the academic year will be awarded the department′s language proficiency certificate.

UNDERSTANDING OF EAST ASIAN SOCIETIES AND CULTURES
All majors are required to gain both historical and contemporary understanding of ″transnational″ East Asia with a comparative perspective on languages and cultures in an increasing globalized world.  Majoring students are expected to acquire this knowledge through interdisciplinary approaches in courses offered in the EALC department as well as cross-listed courses offered by affiliated faculty in other departments such as art history, history, government and music.

CRITICAL READING AND THINKING ABILITY
All majors are expected to not merely ″master″ East Asian languages and cultures under study as a fixed, passive body of knowledge, but more importantly, to develop critical reading and dialectical thinking skills.  Such skills should enable students to think beyond stereotypes, identify and examine many of the prevailing assumptions or misconceptions about East Asian societies and cultures, and develop a keen awareness of cultural diversity and complexity within and across geopolitical boundaries of East Asia.

CRITICAL RESEARCHING AND WRITING ABILITY
All majors should be able to conduct research projects independently (such as knowing how to utilize library resources) and write critical research papers in clear, concise, and intelligent prose in standard academic format.  The goal is for students to be able to contribute to a larger intellectual conversation by producing original and challenging arguments.  For all honors thesis projects, students may also be required to demonstrate an ability to use original Chinese/Japanese language sources if their faculty advisors deem it necessary.

CAREER PREPARATION
All majors are expected, through course work, study-away programs and/or internships, to prepare themselves for various academic and career opportunities related to East Asia upon graduation.  Such opportunities range from graduate school, to jobs in government, international relations, information technology, business, finance, tourism, entertainment, human rights, international law, translation, teaching and much more.

Courses

East Asian Studies

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  101  BEYOND "THE ORIENT":  CRITICAL APPROACHES TO EAST ASIAN LITERATURE AND FILM  Examination of critical issues in modern East Asian literature and  film.  Study of selected works of Chinese and Japanese fiction and film, history, and contemporary literary and cultural theory will address topics including modernity, national and ethnic identity, translation, Orientalism, and globalization.

               This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is designated Writing course.  S. Harb

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  110  INTRODUCTION TO EAST ASIAN HUMANITIES  An introduction to some of the major works of East Asian cultures, spanning China, Japan and Korea.  The course considers the continuing significance of literature, theater, and philosophy from antiquity to modernity.

            Enrollment limited to 40 students.  T. Watanabe

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  200  CHINESE ART AND RELIGION  This is the same course as Art History 200.  Refer to the Art History listing for a course description.

EAST ASIAN LANGUAGES  202  EMPIRE AND EXPANSION IN EAST ASIA, 1840s-1950s  This is the same course as History 202.  Refer to the History listing for a course description.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  203  MODERN CHINESE ART  This is the same course as Art History 203.  Refer to the Art History listing for a course description.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  205  THE ARCHITECTURE OF JAPAN  A survey of Japanese architecture from ancient to contemporary times, examining the ways in which buildings and designed landscapes reflect their historical contexts and shifting cultural values.  The course also deals with the global contribution of Japanese design to ideas about modernity and green architecture.  This is the same course as Art History 205.

               Prerequisite:  Course 101 or Art History 103 or 104, or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 35 students.  T. Watanabe

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  206  CHINA AND THE ENVIRONMENT IN LITERATURE, ART, AND FILM  An investigation of materials, ranging from ancient works of philosophy and painting to documentary films, to explore representations of the environment in Chinese cultural production throughout the ages.  The course focuses on modernity and the artistic response to present environmental crises.  This is the same course as Environmental Studies 206.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour; pass/not passed marking.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  T. Foley

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  206f  CHINA AND THE ENVIRONMENT IN LITERATURE, ART, AND FILM  (In Chinese)  This optional section will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Chinese.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing East Asian Studies 206f must concurrently enroll in East Asian Studies /Environmental Studies 206.  This is the same course as Environmental Studies 206f.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  217  AFTERLIVES AND APOCALYPSES:  POST-WAR JAPANESE CINEMA  This is the same course as Film Studies/Japanese 217.  Refer to the Japanese listing for a course description.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  217f  AFTERLIVES AND APOCALYPSES:  POST-WAR JAPANESE CINEMA  (In Japanese)  This is the same course as Japanese 217f.  Refer to the Japanese listing for a course description.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  220  ALTERNATIVE MODERNITY AND INDIGENOUS POETICS  An introduction to global experiments, from East to West, in seeking alternative modernity and preserving peoples' lands and cultures.  The course explores a new indigenous poetics to promote social/environmental justice.  Readings include environmental literature as well as indigenous writers, poets, and artists from China, North America, Latin America, and beyond.  This is the same course as Comparative Race and Ethnicity/Environmental Studies 220.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  Y. Huang

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  222  WORLD WAR II AND POST-WAR JAPAN  This is the same course as History 222.  Refer to the History listing for a course description.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  223  SHODO:  THE ART OF JAPANESE BRUSHWORK  An introduction to the practice of Japanese brushwork writing from kaisho to gyôsho styles and brush technique.  Weekly hands-on studio time will be supplemented by readings, multimedia screenings, and lectures on the history and aesthetics of East Asian and Japanese calligraphy and script.  Course will be taught in English.  This course may include an optional section that will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Japanese.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive an additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.

                Enrollment limited to 15 students.  S. Harb

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  223f  SHODO:  THE ART OF JAPANESE BRUSHWORK  (In Japanese)  This optional section will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Japanese.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing Course 223f must concurrently enroll in East Asian Studies 223.  S. Harb

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  225  INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN ART  This is the same course as Art History 104.  Refer to the Art History listing for a course description.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  226  THE PERFORMING ARTS OF JAPAN  A survey of the performing arts of Japan from ancient to contemporary times.  Genres include classical theater (Noh, Kabuki), music (court music, folk, J-pop), and modern dance (Butoh).  Japanese conceptions of the body will be discussed to illuminate other practices such as meditation and the martial arts.

               Prerequisite:  Course 101 or History 116, or permission of the instructor.  T. Watanabe

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  226f  THE PERFORMING ARTS OF JAPAN  (In Japanese)  A survey of  the performing arts of Japan from ancient to contemporary times.  Genres to be examined include classical theater (Noh, Kabuki), music (court music, folk, J-pop), and modern dance (Butoh).  Japanese conceptions of the body will be discussed to illuminate other practices such as meditation and the martial arts.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing East Asian Studies 206f must concurrently enroll in East Asian Studies 226.  T. Watanabe

EAST ASIAN STUDIES 230  GENDER IN COMMUNIST AND POST-COMMUNIST SOCIETIES   This is the same course as Gender and Women's Studies/Slavic Studies 230.  Refer to the Slavic Studies listing for a course description.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  247  GANGSTERS AND CRIMINALS:  OUTLAWS IN JAPANESE CULTURE  Major works of fiction, film, and manga comics depicting organized crime, bandits, and other criminal activity.  From yakuza movies to detective novels, we will explore the shifting dynamics of power and the law, the permissible vs. the impermissible in the cultural imagination of pre-modern and modern Japan.  This is the same course as Film Studies 247.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  S. Harb

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  250  A DIFFERENT AWAKENING:  POETIC ENLIGHTENMENT FROM EAST TO WEST  A study of the experience of awakening and enlightenment in eastern (Chinese, Japanese, Tibetan, and Persian) and western poetry.  The identities of the poets are diverse:  Taoist philosophers, Zen and Tibetan Buddhist monks, Sufi mystics, Surrealist or Beat poets, and Kung Fu masters.  Authors may include Lao Zi, Zhuang Zi, Cold Mountain, Ikkyu, Basho, Rumi, Lu Xun, Henri Michaux, Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder, and Bruce Lee.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  Y. Huang

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  253  NO HOMELAND IS FREE:  CHINESE AMERICAN LITERATURE  Introduction to Chinese American literature and its history.  We will read from the poems by Chinese immigrants on the Angel Island in the early 20th century to the latest diaspora authors writing in English such as Li-Young Lee and Ha Jin.  We will consider issues of race and gender, language and identity, incarceration and liberation, loss and perseverance, homeland and free life.  This is the same course as American Studies/Comparative Race and Ethnicity/English 253.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  Y. Huang

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  254  CONFRONTING IMAGES OF MODERN JAPAN  This is the same course as History 254.  Refer to the history listing for a course description.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  254f  CONFRONTING IMAGES OF MODERN JAPAN (In Japanese)  This is the same course as History 254f.  Refer to the history listing for a course description.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  260  BORDERLESS WORLDS? EXPERIMENTAL TRAVEL, ART AND LANGUAGE  This is the same course as Gender and Women's Studies/German Studies 260.  Refer to the German Studies listing for a course description.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  265  READING MODERN CHINA  A survey of Chinese literature in the twentieth century, examining ″modernity″ as an emerging concept in the struggles between individual and society, present and past, countryside and city, and gender.  Special attention will be paid to six major writers:  Lu Xun, Shen Congwen, Xiao Hong, Eileen Chang, Qian Zhongshu, and Yu Hua.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  C. Jingling

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  277  MASTERPIECES OF JAPANESE VERSE  From the oldest written texts, to the 31-syllable tanka of the great imperial anthologies, to the practice of linked verse and the subsequent evolution of the haiku form, to contemporary lyrical experimentation, this course introduces the rich multisensory intersections of word and image in Japanese poetry.  Emphasis on the materialities and geographical/historical contexts that enliven Japanese verse through examination of written poetry's interconnections with orality, performance, calligraphic writing, paper-making, manuscript culture, and painting.

               Enrollment limited to 40 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  S. Harb

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  302  DOWN WITH THE FUTURE:  POST-SOCIALIST CHINA AND ITS CULTURAL LOGIC  What is the historical horizon and cultural logic behind the drastic social transition that China has undergone from the Cultural Revolution to the 2008 Beijing Olympics and a post-socialist present?  What is its future?  With such questions in mind, we will compare the different depictions of a utopian/dystopian future by some of the most dynamic and innovative Chinese writers, artists, and social critics.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  Y. Huang

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  312  BUDDHIST ART:  INDIA, CHINA, AND JAPAN  This is the same course as Art History 301.  Refer to the Art History listing for a course description.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  317  HEROES AND HEROINES IN JAPANESE LITERATURE AND FILM  This is the same course as Japanese/Film Studies 317.  Refer to the Japanese listing for a course description.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  317f  HEROES AND HEROINES IN JAPANESE LITERATURE AND FILM  (In Japanese)  This is the same course as Japanese/Film Studies 317f.  Refer to the Japanese listing for a course description.

East Asian Studies  320  FROM TEA TO CONNECTICUT ROLLS:  DEFINING JAPANESE CULTURE THROUGH FOOD  This is the same course as History 320.  Refer to the History listing for a course description.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  320f  FROM TEA TO CONNECTICUT ROLLS:  DEFINING JAPANESE CULTURE THROUGH FOOD  (In Japanese)  This is the same course as History 320f.  Refer to the History listing for a course description.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  322  THE LEGACY OF WORLD WAR II IN ″POST-WAR″ JAPAN  An examination and assessment of the dilemma of the ″post-war″ and how the war and the American occupation continue to reverberate politically and culturally.  Diverse articulations of the war and its aftermath in both high and popular genres will be scrutinized.  This course may include an optional section that will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Japanese.  This is the same course as History 322.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.

               Prerequisite:  History 116.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  T. Watanabe

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  322f  THE LEGACY OF WORLD WAR II IN ″POST-WAR″ JAPAN  (In Japanese)  This optional section will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Japanese.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing East Asian Studies 322f must concurrently enroll in East Asian Studies 322. This is the same course as History 322f.  T. Watanabe

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  357  SCREENING EAST ASIA THROUGH MASTERPIECES OF TRANSNATIONAL CINEMA  This course explores and analyzes key ″Asian″ films produced in international collaboration as a way of critically interrogating the categories of ″national cinema″ and ″Asia.″  We will study key works by major directors such as Akira Kurosawa, Chen Kaige, Wong Kar-wai, Hou Hsiao-Hsien, and Park Chan-wook.  This is the same course as Film Studies 357.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  S. Harb

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  377  GRAPHIC STRIPS:  GENDER AND SEXUALITY IN COMICS, MANGA, AND ANIMATED FILM  A critical analysis of global and transnational comics, manga, graphic novels, animated films such as Persepolis, Batman, Same Differences and Other Stories, Ghost in the Shell, and works by Hayao Miyazaki.  The course enhances critical thinking and writing about word-image media and introduces gender theory and visual studies.  This is the same course as Film Studies/Gender and Women′s Studies 377.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  S. Harb

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  427  THE CHINESE BODY  This is the same course as History 427.  Refer to the History listing for a course description.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES 450  ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY ALONG THE SILK ROAD  This is the same course as Art History 400.  Refer to Art History listing for a course description.  This course is not open to students who have received credit for Art History/East Asian Studies 493G, 494G.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  451  MOMENTS IN CONTEMPORARY CHINESE ART  An examination of Chinese art at different historical moments from the 1960s to the present, with attention to its ideological content.  Topics include perspective and socialist utopia; rebellion and double-faced modernism; political pop and cynical realism; nostalgia and the end of art.  Students will help organize a small exhibition.  This is the same course as Art History 402.

               Open to junior and senior majors in East Asian languages and cultures and art history; and to others with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  Y. Huang

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  493, 494  SENIOR SEMINAR IN EAST ASIAN CULTURE  An examination of a topic in modern and contemporary East Asian Culture (focusing primarily on China and Japan).

               Open to junior and senior majors in the department, and to others with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment in each seminar limited to 16 students.  Staff

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  493B, 494B  NARRATIVES OF THE EAST ASIAN DIASPORA  A study of the past century of Asian Diaspora through literary works by writers of Japanese and Chinese descent.  We will read texts against various historical forces that have spurred recent migrations, and consider the multiple cultural resources Asian diasporic writers draw upon to craft their stories.  A. Dooling

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  493C, 494C  THE FANTASTIC OTHER:  TRAVEL, HISTORY, UTOPIA  A comparative examination of the theme of seeking the Other in 20th century literature and theory concerning China and Japan.  Authors may include Lu Xun, Zhang Chengzhi, Yukio Mishima, Haruki Murakami, Hegel, Paul Claudel, Victor Segalen, Saint-John Perse, Henri Michaux, James Hilton, Edgar Snow, Susan Sontag, and Roland Barthes.  Y. Huang

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  493D, 494D  TRANSNATIONAL ASIA AND THE POST-EXOTIC  A critical exploration of changing conceptions of modern and contemporary Asia (and subjective locations therein) within a dynamic global context.  The course examines cultural texts (novels, poems, films, anime, multimedia) dealing with memory, history, technology, identity, and otherness, as well as the (im)possibility of escape in a post-exotic age.

               Prerequisite:  Course 101 or permission of the instructor.  History 115 or 116 is recommended.  S. Harb

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  493M, 494M  COOKING, CONSUMING EAST ASIA  A comparative exploration of how foodways reflect, inform, and translate modern East Asian identities across the globe.  Debates regarding authenticity, nostalgia, food safety, family structures, and gender roles will be pursued.  Emphasis on primary textual and multimedia sources.

               Prerequisite:  Juniors and seniors who are East Asian majors, or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  T. Watanabe

EAST ASIAN STUDIES  497-498  HONORS STUDY

Chinese Language and Literature

CHINESE  101, 102  INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY CHINESE  An introduction to the written Chinese language and the spoken standard dialect of Mandarin.  Seven hours weekly.  Six hours credit each semester.

               Prerequisite:  Course 101 is prerequisite to Course 102.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  A. Dooling, T. King

CHINESE  108  NON-INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY CHINESE  An introduction to basic Mandarin Chinese for non-East Asian Studies majors.  An emphasis on the development of novice-level listening and speaking skills through communicative activities relating broadly to international traveling, daily survival, and cultural appreciation.  Students will learn 80 substantive characters widely represented in everyday mass culture - buildings, menus, signs, and tattoos.  This course cannot be used to satisfy the language requirement for General Education.

               Offered in Spring 2011 and every other year after that.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  T. King

CHINESE  110  CHINESE AT THE REGIONAL MULTICULTURAL MAGNET SCHOOL (RMMS)  A community learning course for students enrolled in the Chinese language program.  Students will teach Chinese language and culture twice a week to elementary school students at the Regional Multicultural Magnet School (RMMS) in downtown New London.  Course requirements include mandatory participation in teaching workshops held by RMMS.  One credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  This course may be repeated for a maximum of two credits.

               Prerequisite:  Chinese 101.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  A. Dooling

CHINESE  120, 121, 122, 123  BASIC SPOKEN CANTONESE I, II, III, IV  A step-by-step introduction to the 9-tone syllabic inventory of South China’s most deep-rooted regionalect (ca. 80 million speakers) via narrow transcriptions by the International Phonetic Alphabet.  This four-course sequence will cover basic vocabulary and speech patterns required for uncomplicated oral communication in urban contemporary settings.  Taught in Mandarin in a comparative-contrastive framework for dialect study.  Two credit hours.  This course cannot be used to satisfy the language requirement for General Education.

               Prerequisite:  Intermediate-mid Mandarin or permission of the instructor.  Course 120 is a prerequisite to 121, 121 is a prerequisite to 122, and 122 is a prerequisite to 123.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  T. King

CHINESE  201, 202  INTENSIVE INTERMEDIATE CHINESE I, II  Further development of speaking and writing skills that are necessary to sustain interpersonal communications in Modern Standard Chinese at the Intermediate-mid proficiency level.  Situation/theme-driven frameworks and drill/image-enriched instructions lead to the design and staging of a comprehensive oral practicum at the end of each semester.  Throughout the year, students will learn 500 new characters and 160 grammar patterns.  Course 201 is supplemented with a character conversion module, and Course 202 is supplemented with a dictionary use and a character conversion component; both will be quiz and review intense.  Six hours weekly, including individually and or doubly scheduled oral practice sessions. Five credit hours each semester.

               Prerequisite:  Course 101, 102, or satisfactory placement exam.  Course 201 is prerequisite to 202.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  T. King, Staff

CHINESE  301, 302  UPPER INTERMEDIATE CHINESE  This course develops skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese at the upper intermediate level.  Readings and discussion focus on contemporary and everyday topics.  Emphasis on preparation for the complexity of advanced Chinese.

               Prerequisite:  Course 202 or equivalent.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  Staff

CHINESE  303  INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICAL CHINESE  Study of grammatical structure in classical prose, with readings in representative masterpieces of prose style.

               Prerequisite:  Course 202.  Staff

CHINESE  401, 403, 404  ADVANCED CHINESE:  TOPICS ON CONTEMPORARY CHINESE SOCIETY AND CULTURE  Selected issues facing Chinese society as depicted in mass media sources such as newspapers, journals, films, and television.  Selections of poetry, prose, and short fiction by modern and contemporary authors.  Particular emphasis on reading and writing skills.  Topics may vary from year to year.

               Prerequisite:  Course 202 or equivalent.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Y. Huang

CHINESE  402  MULTIMEDIA CHINESE  A guided exploration of cultural products accessible online as instruments of Chinese language learning, from blogs, forums, slides, advertisements, and commercials to emails, chats, games, MP3s, and radio and video clips.  Students will transcribe, annotate, analyze, and present materials both assigned and self-compiled to rediscover and reconstruct China′s kaleidoscopic, socio-cultural realities in the cyber age.

               Prerequisite:  Course 302 or equivalent.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Staff

In English

CHINESE  232  PERIPHERIES AND DIFFERENCES:  RE-IMAGINING CONTEMPORARY CHINA  A study of contemporary Chinese cultural imagination of peripheries and differences within and outside the once static and uniform ″China.″  Topics include the so-called ″ethnic″ literature produced by both Han and non-Han ethnic minority writers; literature of the underground, exiles, and the Diaspora; and popular culture in various forms ranging from urban pop fiction to new Hong Kong cinema (such as John Woo and Wong Kar-War).  The key issue will be the problematics of China's rapidly changing cultural imagination and identity in this new global context.

               Prerequisite:  East Asian Studies 101 recommended.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  Y. Huang

CHINESE  236  FICTION AND FILM IN MODERN CHINA  Major works of fiction and film in 20th century China, in the context of the shifting cultural, social, and political developments from the May Fourth movement to the present.  In addition to considering the differences between visual and verbal modes of narrative representation, topics will include China's quest for modernity, the discourse of the "new woman," and the relationship between revolution and aesthetic practice.

               Prerequisite:  East Asian Studies 101 recommended.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is designated Writing course.  A. Dooling

CHINESE  238  CHINESE POETRY AND ITS AMERICAN LEGACIES  An introduction to classical and contemporary Chinese poetry and how it works in English translation and re-incarnation.  Authors may include Tang poets such as Li Bai (or Li Po), Wang Wei, Bai Juyi (or Po Chu-i), Han Shan (or Cold Mountain) and contemporary post-Cultural Revolution ″Misty″ poets such as Bei Dao, Gu Cheng and Duoduo.  The influence of the translation of classical Chinese poetry on modern American poets, the contrast and connection between contemporary and classical Chinese poetry, the problems and politics of translation, the prospect of a renewed dialogue and cross-fertilization between Chinese and American poetries.

               Prerequisite:  East Asian Studies 101 recommended.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  Y. Huang

CHINESE  244  MODERN CHINESE WOMEN'S WRITING IN TRANSLATION  A survey of works by 20th century Chinese women writers (including writers from Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the Diaspora) across a variety of literary genres, along with reading in feminist literary theory.  Focus on the relationship between gender and representation, the construction of modern gender paradigms, the influence of imperatives of Chinese modernity on configurations of femininity and masculinity.  This is the same course as Gender and Women's Studies 244.

               Prerequisite:  East Asian Studies 101 recommended.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  A. Dooling

CHINESE  291, 292  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

CHINESE  391, 392  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

CHINESE  491, 492  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

Japanese Language and Literature

JAPANESE  101, 102  INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY JAPANESE  An introduction to the Japanese language emphasizing primarily speaking and listening.  Entry level reading and writing is introduced.  Students will be required to work with audio materials to develop these skills.

               Classes meet seven and one-half hours weekly.  Six hours credit each semester.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  H. Kobayashi

JAPANESE  201, 202  INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE  Further development in both spoken and written Japanese beyond the elementary level.  Students are required to communicate with native speakers in a socio-linguistically and culturally appropriate manner.  Audiovisual materials and selected readings are used to develop these skills.  Classes meet five hours weekly.  Five credit hours each semester.

               Prerequisite:  Course 102 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  H. Kobayashi

JAPANESE  217f  AFTERLIVES AND APOCALYPSES:  POST-WAR JAPANESE CINEMA  This optional section will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Japanese.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing Course 217f must concurrently enroll in East Asian Studies/Japanese 217.  This is the same course as East Asian Studies 217f.  S. Harb

JAPANESE  301  UPPER INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE  This course, intended to prepare students for Japanese 400 and/or study in Japan, develops intermediate to advanced language skills with a focus on practical communication.  Emphasis on reading short essays, personal letters, and newspaper articles, as well as writing letters, e-mails, and opinion papers.

               Prerequisite:  Course 202 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Staff

JAPANESE  317f  HEROES AND HEROINES IN JAPANESE LITERATURE AND FILM  This optional section will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Japanese.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing Course 317f must concurrently enroll in East Asian Studies/Film Studies/Japanese 317.  This is the same course as East Asian Studies /Film Studies 317f.  S. Harb

JAPANESE  400  ADVANCED JAPANESE  Further development in spoken and written Japanese to prepare students to handle a variety of communicative tasks.  Students learn to express opinions and narrate experiences in all major time frames in paragraph length discourse.  Special emphasis on developing reading and writing skills.  Course content changes each semester.

               Prerequisite:  Japanese 202 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment in each seminar limited to 16 students.  Staff

JAPANESE  400A  CONTEMPORARY TEXTS  Emphasis on improving reading and writing skills through exposure to a broad range of modern journalistic and literary styles.  Materials include newspapers, magazines, articles, essays, short stories, advertisements, and comic books.  Students are required to study Kanji (Chinese characters) independently.  S. Harb

JAPANESE  400B  SPOKEN DISCOURSE  Emphasis on improving discussion and oral narrative skills through focus on current issues in Japanese society, such as marriage, workplace policy and organization, women's status, the aging of the population, youth culture, challenges to tradition, changes in the family, and environmental problems.  S. Harb

JAPANESE  400C  SPOKEN AND WRITTEN NARRATIVE  Emphasis on improving oral and written proficiency through class discussion and written assignments.  Themes considered in the course will vary depending on students' interests.  Students are required to write a two to three page essay every week.  S. Harb

JAPANESE  400D  TRANSLATION FROM AND TO JAPANESE  A study of various texts translated from English to Japanese and from Japanese to English, with the object of understanding the fundamental properties of the language.  Discussion is conducted in Japanese.  Materials include literary texts, magazines, articles, essays, Manga, and songs.  As a final project, students will be required to translate a primary text.  Staff

In English

JAPANESE  217  AFTERLIVES AND APOCALYPSES:  POST-WAR JAPANESE CINEMA  An examination of the most important and influential Japanese films made in the decades following the end of World War II.  The course considers key ideas, thematic motifs, and visual strategies pertaining to the legacy of the war and its aftermath.  This is the same course as East Asian Studies 217/Film Studies 217.  This course may include an optional section that will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Japanese.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.

               Prerequisite:  East Asian Studies 101 recommended.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  S. Harb

JAPANESE  317  HEROES AND HEROINES IN JAPANESE LITERATURE AND FILM  From errant samurai and women warriors to eccentric monks and femmes fatales, Japanese narratives offer a lively cast of heroes and heroines.  This course explores representations of such strong and suggestive characters, and traces the evolution of the notion of the ″hero″ through major works of Japanese literature and film.  This is the same course as East Asian Studies/Film Studies 317.  This course may include an optional section that will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Japanese.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.

               Prerequisite:  East Asian Studies 101 or History 116 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  S. Harb

JAPANESE  291, 292  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

JAPANESE  391, 392  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

JAPANESE  491, 492  INDIVIDUAL STUDY