Education



Professor:  James; Assistant Professors:  Anderson, Wright; Certification Officer and Educator in Residence:  Cocores; Associate Professor Grande, chair

The Education Department views American education as a reflection of a set of political, economic and cultural relationships that reflect the dominant social arrangements of U.S. society.  Teaching is therefore viewed as a political act.  The goal of the Teacher Education Program is to produce critical educators who understand that one of the consequences of living in a pluralistic society is the existence of a variety of conflicting views of what it means to be educated.  As such, it works to instill in students a sense of responsibility to participate in the political process by which educational policies are initiated, employed and resisted.

               The Department employs a social justice curriculum where students are expected to:  (1) achieve excellence in their field, (2) understand classrooms as a reflection of larger social-political and economic forces, (3) develop critical and anti-bias pedagogies and, (4) to view the classroom as a dynamic and dialectical space.

               There will be changes in the certification regulations for students who plan to apply for certification after July 1, 2014.  (These changes will not affect the students who graduate in June of 2014 as long as they complete all of their requirements and apply for certification before July 1, 2014).  Students should check with the Education Department Certification Officer for details.

Elementary Program

State Certificate

Connecticut College is accredited to prepare elementary school teachers, grades K-6.  Candidates for an elementary certificate may major in any of the academic departments of the College.  Certification students will also receive instruction in special education as part of their course work.  Connecticut College is also accredited to prepare music teachers, K-12; for the requirements for the major in music with a concentration in Music Education see page 128.

               The prospective elementary teacher must have a minimum of 39 semester hours in general education, including a survey course in U.S. History and study in the following areas:  natural sciences*; social studies; English; mathematics**; and foreign language or fine arts.  The education department may specify areas of general study depending on a candidate's background.

               All students must also meet the following professional requirements:  Education 103 (2 credits), 223, 304, 313, 341, 445 and 450; Human Development 111, 225.  It is advisable to take Education 223 and Human Development 111 in the freshman year, Human Development 225 and Education 341 in the sophomore year, and Education 304 and 313 in the junior year.

               During either the first or second semester of the senior year, the student will devote the full semester to teacher preparation, taking Education 445 concurrently with Education 450.

*Requires course in science department.

**Requires course in mathematics department.

Secondary Programs

State Certificate

Connecticut College is accredited to prepare secondary school teachers in the following fields:  English, history-social studies, Spanish, mathematics, biology, chemistry, general science, earth science, and physics.  Connecticut College is also accredited to prepare music teachers, K-12; for the requirements for the major in music with a concentration in Music Education see page 128.

               The prospective secondary teacher must have a minimum of 39 semester hours in general education including a survey course in U.S. history and study in five of the following areas:  natural sciences*; social studies; fine arts; English; mathematics**; and foreign language.  The education department may specify areas of general study depending on a candidate's background.  In addition, candidates for secondary certification generally must major in the area in which they seek certification.

               The student must also meet the following professional requirements:  Education 103 (2 credits), 223, 225, 305, 450, and 457; Human Development 225 and 307.  It is advisable to take Education 223 in the freshman year.  In the senior year the student will devote one semester primarily to teacher preparation, taking Education 450 concurrently with Education 457.

*Requires course in science department.

**Requires course in mathematics department.

Learning Goals in the Education Major

The Education Department at Connecticut College prepares students to teach in public schools.   In following the liberal arts tradition, they approach the study of teaching and education as an intellectual pursuit and not a practitioner model that stresses ″techniques.″  The aim is to prepare students to not only assume their roles as classroom teachers but also as active citizens and public intellectuals.  The following goals and competencies are a sample of how student learning is assessed throughout the program.

GOALS

  • To educate teachers who understand that excellence in teaching begins with deep knowledge and a critical understanding of their subject matter as a means of developing high standards of achievement and excellence for their K-12 students.
    • Candidates demonstrate knowledge of their subject matter by not only meeting State requirements but also Connecticut College standards of excellence in their major area(s) of study.
    • Candidates demonstrate understanding of the national, state, and professional standards within their subject matter as well as critical knowledge of the major principles and constructs.
  • To educate teachers who understand that education and schooling are shaped by larger socio-historical, political, economic, and geographic contexts.
    • Candidates demonstrate a critical understanding of the history of education and schooling in the United States as it relates to and has been connected with the process of nation building and globalization.
    • Candidates demonstrate a critical understanding of knowledge as both situated and historical.
  • To educate teachers who construct critical pedagogies that are situated in and shaped by students′ prior knowledge, local contexts and community knowledge.
    • Candidates demonstrate knowledge of the current and historical issues relevant to the greater New London community.
    • Candidates understand and build upon the knowledge and assets students bring to the classroom.
  • To educate teachers who understand the relationship between power and knowledge and who create classrooms as critical sites of action where essential questions related to educational access, opportunity, conditions and outcomes.
    • Candidates demonstrate an understanding of classrooms as sites of struggle, possibility and transformation where the relationship between knowledge and power is engaged.
    • Candidates understand differentiated instruction through a critical framework.
  • To educate teachers who understand literacy as having multiple dimensions, forms and functions that develop both inside and outside of schools.  Literacies are meaning making processes in which dynamics of power, voice, access, subjectivity, and representation are operating.
    • Candidates demonstrate critical knowledge about the processes of language acquisition and literacy.  That is, they demonstrate understanding of the relationship between language and power through their ability to employ approaches that disrupt compensatory and deficit models, especially as they relate to English Language Learners and ″struggling readers and writers.″
  • To educate teachers who understand assessment and evaluation as contextual, as forms of inquiry and ongoing processes of reflection and praxis.
    • Candidates demonstrate knowledge of the differences among formative and summative assessments and evaluation and how to use them effectively as part of instruction.

Courses

While the Education Department is committed to working with all area schools in our coursework, we continue to develop special partnerships with New London and Groton schools.

EDUCATION  103  AIDS, BULLYING, AGGRESSION/SUICIDE, DRUG PREVENTION AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION FOR TEACHERS  Preparation for elementary and secondary teacher candidates to address these challenges to health and well being with their students.  Members of the class will engage in a critical examination of accepted methods and materials with an emphasis on:  risk factors, approaches to prevention, teaching strategies, and the evaluation of educational materials.  Two hours of credit, marked as pass/not passed.  C. Cocores

EDUCATION  223  FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION  An introduction for students to the notion of schools as sites of political struggle.  Students examine this problematic through the historical, sociological, political, and economic lenses as well as contemporary theories of education:  liberal/progressive, traditional/conservative, and revolutionary/critical theories.  Students apply these theories to their examinations of contemporary public schools and classrooms.  Students are required to complete a minimum 20-hour in-school practicum as part of this course.

               Open to freshmen and sophomores; and to juniors and seniors enrolled in an education certificate program.  Enrollment limited to 25 students per section.  Offered both semesters.  This course satisfies General Education Area 3 and is a designated Writing course.  M. James, S. Grande

EDUCATION  225 CURRICULUM AND CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT This course connects learning and teaching with methods of K-12 classroom assessment.  Students will learn how to plan and develop assessment tools that support their pedagogical decisions.  Through the lens of critical pedagogy, students will evaluate and interpret data produced by different forms of assessment.

               Prerequisite:  Course 223.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  Staff

EDUCATION  226  GENDER AND HUMAN RIGHTS  This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 226.  Refer to the Gender and Women′s Studies listing for a course description.

EDUCATION  283  MUSEUM EDUCATION  This is the same course as Art History 283.  Refer to the Art History listing for a course description.

EDUCATION  270  TEACHING AND LEARNING FOR SOCIAL CHANGE:  POWER, AGENCY, AND ACTION  An examination of the theory and methods of social justice approaches in education.  Key questions engaged by the course include:  What are the tensions, barriers, and possibilities when students are decision-makers and change agents in the educational process?  What are the theoretical, curricular, and methodological approaches to student-led participatory action research projects?  Students will analyze case studies to develop a range of perspectives on social change projects in education.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  D. Wright

EDUCATION  304  MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL  This course uses critical and constructivist/inquiry based approaches to understanding concepts in science and integration of mathematics and science in the elementary classrooms.  It includes observation and teaching in elementary schools.  Connections will be developed between the Education Department′s social justice curriculum and the art of teaching mathematics and science in elementary schools.

               Prerequisite:  Course 223 and Human Development 111.  Offered second semester.  M. James

EDUCATION  305  CURRICULAR THEORIES AND DESIGN IN THE CONTENT AREA  Students will engage the major strands of contemporary curricular theories and design.  The course includes field placements in local public schools, where students will observe the application of curricular theory, design, and instructional strategies in their content areas.  Emphasis on the connections between curricular theory and pedagogy, which together constitute praxis.  Six credit hours.

               Prerequisite:  Course 223.  Enrollment limited to 25 students.  S. Grande

EDUCATION  313  CHILDREN′S BOOKS, CULTURE AND TEACHING LITERACY  An exploration of the purposes multicultural children′s literature serves in promoting literacy development in K-6 diverse learners.  Guided by current research and practice in literacy, pedagogy, childhood studies and social justice education, students will read and evaluate books with emphasis on developing curriculum design and instruction.

               Prerequisite:  Course 341, and either Human Development 111 or 307.  Preference is given to students in the elementary school teacher certification program; others with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Offered second semester.  Staff

EDUCATION  316  QUEER PEDAGOGY  An examination of the intersection between education, culture, and sexuality.  The course employs queer theory/queer pedagogy to analyze classrooms and curricula as racialized, genderized, and sexualized spaces where multiple voices are silenced.  The course is not a blueprint for ″best practices″; rather it is designed to contribute to the larger debate about the benefit of integrating the relevant theory and pedagogy into the academic curriculum.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course is not required for the teacher certification program.  Staff

EDUCATION  325   EDUCATIONAL POLICY ANALYSIS, CRITICAL SOCIAL THEORY, AND EDUCATIONAL REFORM  An exploration of the historical, economic, philosophical and political fields in which educational policy ismade, contested, and enacted.  Students will examine the current (market-based) model of educational reform engaging in analysis of underlying theories of change, challenges to implementation, and critiques from various perspectives.  Students will also consider alternatives, specifically community and research-based models of reform.

               Prerequisite:  Course 223; or a 100-level course in History, Government or Economics.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  S. Grande

EDUCATION  341  LITERACY IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS  An exploration of the theoretical and practical approaches to teaching reading and writing within a comprehensive elementary literacy program.  Students will examine ways to build social justice classroom communities, which engage children as active readers and writers, and are congruent with national and state guidelines and standards.  A three-hour a week field experience in an elementary school is required.  Six hours credit.

               Prerequisite:  Course 223.  Offered second semester.  Enrollment limited to 25 students. Staff

EDUCATION  350  EDUCATION AND THE REVOLUTIONARY PROJECT IN LATIN AMERICA  An analysis of the role of popular education in twentieth-century revolutionary ideology in Latin America.  Students will examine the Zapatista movement in México, Marxist education in Cuba, and the Sandinista literacy campaign in Nicaragua.  The course begins with an analysis of the radical Brazilian philosopher and educator, Paolo Freire.  This is the same course as American Studies/Comparative Race and Ethnicity/Gender and Women′s Studies 350.

               This course is recommended for sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 9 students.  This course is not part of the certification program.  This is a designated Writing course.  M. James

EDUCATION  394  SOCIAL JUSTICE EDUCATION IN CONTEXT:  IDENTITIES, NARRATIVES AND TRANSFORMATION  Through ethnography, theory, oral histories, and film, this course explores case studies of social justice projects as an approach to learning and teaching.  Topics include the contradictions, limitations, and possibilities embedded in conceptions of social justice, participatory action research, and social justice education.

               Prerequisite:  Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors and to freshmen with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 3, and is a designated Writing course.  D. Wright

EDUCATION  445  STUDENT TEACHING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL  The department will arrange teaching in an area school.  Whenever possible, there will be two placements, one urban and the other, suburban.  This course allows students to put into practice the department's conceptual framework of social justice.  Students will observe and student-teach in the classroom for eleven weeks and take part in a biweekly seminar class.  This course is designed to be taken in conjunction with Education 450.

               Prerequisite:  Courses 225, 304, and 313; and Human Development 111 and 225; and permission of the department.  Offered both semesters.  Eight hours credit.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  L. Anderson, M. James

EDUCATION  450  STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR IN CRITICAL PEDAGOGY:  ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOL  Students will observe in a public school classroom before and after the student teaching experience, taking part in intensive and rigorous class work designed to prepare participants for the student teaching experience.  They will learn to incorporate social justice themes and pedagogies into classroom management, unit design, lesson planning, and student assessment.  This course is designed to be taken in conjunction with either Education 445 or 457.

               Prerequisite for elementary certification:  Courses 304, 313, and 341; and Human Development 111 and 225; and permission of the department.  Prerequisite for secondary certification:  Courses 225 and 305; and Human Development 225 and 307; and permission of the department.  Offered both semesters.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  S. Grande, M. James, D. Wright, Staff

EDUCATION  457  STUDENT TEACHING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL  The department will arrange teaching in an area school.  This course allows students to put into practice the department's conceptual framework of teaching for social justice.  Students will observe and student-teach in the classroom for eleven weeks and take part in a biweekly seminar class.

               Prerequisite:  Courses 225 and 305; and Human Development 225 and 307; and permission of the department.  Offered both semesters.  Eight hours credit.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  S. Grande, C. Cocores

EDUCATION  291, 292  INDIVIDUAL STUDY  Independent research work with a selected faculty member.  Course may be taken for either two or four credits.  The two-credit option requires the student to commit to four to five hours of independent research and/or field work per week.  The four-credit option requires the student to commit to eight to ten hours of independent research and/or field work per week.

EDUCATION  391, 392  INDIVIDUAL STUDY  Independent research work with a selected faculty member.  Course may be taken for either two or four credits.  The two-credit option requires the student to commit to four to five hours of independent research and/or field work per week.  The four-credit option requires the student to commit to eight to ten hours of independent research and/or field work per week.

EDUCATION  491, 492  INDIVIDUAL STUDY  Independent research work with a selected faculty member.  Course may be taken for either two or four credits.  The two-credit option requires the student to commit to four to five hours of independent research and/or field work per week.  The four-credit option requires the student to commit to eight to ten hours of independent research and/or field work per week.

CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY  See Human Development 111.

EDUCATIONAL MEASUREMENTS  See Psychology 303.

SOCIOLOGY  223,  ETHNIC AND RACE RELATIONS  is recommended for future teachers.