Hispanic Studies



Professor:  Graziano; Associate Professor:  Gonzaléz, Heredia; Assistant Professor:  Rudolph; Adjunct Assistant Professor:  Koehler; Adjunct Instructor:  Glenn, Nick; Professor Kushigian, chair

Overview of the Majors

The department offers two majors:  a disciplinary major in Hispanic Studies, which integrates language, literary, and cultural studies on Spain and Spanish America, and an interdisciplinary major in Latin American Studies, which combines language proficiency with a flexible interdepartmental curriculum.  Students may opt to combine Hispanic Studies and Latin American Studies as double majors.

With departmental permission granted in advance, one course taken at other institutions per semester, including study abroad programs, may be counted toward the major requirements.  A second course per semester may be counted, provided that it corresponds to Course 207, 250, or 251 at Connecticut College.  When the study away is done within a SATA program, a total of three courses may be counted toward the major or minor requirements.  Internship and service-learning opportunities, in New London and abroad, provide additional options for enhancing the major.  All courses at the 200 level and above are taught in Spanish unless otherwise indicated.  Any Freshman Seminar taken in Spanish fulfills the foreign language requirement and may replace 250 or 251 depending on the course content.

The Major in Hispanic Studies

The major consists of a minimum of nine courses taken in the Department of Hispanic Studies.  These must include Courses 207 and 208 (the core sequence in grammar, writing, and theory) and Courses 250 and 251 (the core sequence in Hispanic cultures).  Courses 250 and 251 may be taken out of sequence.  Following the fulfillment of these requirements, students may take any upper-division course in Hispanic Studies.  A minimum of five courses (distributed at student discretion among Iberian and Latin American offerings) is required for the major.  At least four of them must be in literary or cultural studies.  These must be at or above the 300 level, and at least one must be at the 400 level.  Students are strongly encouraged to study abroad.

 Advisers:  L. González, F. Graziano, A. Heredia, J. Kushigian, J. Rudolph

The Major in Latin American Studies

This interdisciplinary major is offered and administered by the Department of Hispanic Studies and advised by the Council on Latin American Studies.  The major integrates the academic resources of all Connecticut College departments and programs that offer coursework on the region, and it endeavors to complement and enhance the understanding of Latin America gained through disciplinary instruction.  The core curriculum of the Latin American Studies major provides a solid foundation of knowledge on the region, a rigorous interdisciplinary methodology, and language proficiency in Spanish.  Flexibility in the major offers each student the opportunity to pursue a more specialized topic, region, or discipline of interest.  Students are encouraged to double major or minor in a discipline that supports the focus of their interdisciplinary major.  Students are strongly encouraged to study abroad.

               The Latin American Studies major consists of a minimum of nine courses taken in the Department of Hispanic Studies and in other Connecticut College departments and programs that offer courses on Latin America.  The requirements include:  1) Hispanic Studies 207; 2) a choice of one of the following:  Hispanic Studies 251, History 114 or 219; 3) one Social Science survey course on Latin America taken in any department; 4) four courses on Latin America, at or above the 200 level, taken in any department; and 5) two courses on Latin America in the Department of Hispanic Studies.  These must beat or above the 300 level, and at least one must be at the 400 level.

Advisers in Hispanic Studies:  F. Graziano, A. Heredia, J. Kushigian, J. Rudolph

Advisers in Related Fields:  L. Garofalo (History), R. Gay (Sociology), A. Hybel (Government), M. Lizarralde (Anthropology/Botany), Maria Cruz-Saco (Economics)

The Minor in Hispanic Studies

The minor consists of a minimum of six courses in the Department of Hispanic Studies at or above the 200 level.  These must include Courses 250 and 251.  Courses 250 and 251 may be taken out of sequence.

               With departmental permission granted in advance, one course per semester taken at another institution, including a study abroad program, may be counted toward the minor requirements.

The Minor in Latin American Studies

The minor consists of a minimum of six courses in the Department of Hispanic Studies at or above the 200 level.  These must include Hispanic Studies 251 or History 114, 216, or 219.

               With departmental permission granted in advance, one course per semester taken at another institution, including a study abroad program, may be counted toward the minor requirements.

Learning Goals in the Hispanic Studies Major

Hispanic Studies offers flexible majors adaptable to varied student interests and needs.  The traditional focus on language and literature is a departmental strength, and it is complemented by offerings in cultural studies, interdisciplinary Latin American studies, and Latino studies.

 LANGUAGE

 Students demonstrate sufficient written and oral proficiency in Spanish to express analytical thought, to understand non-dialectical speech, and to read literary and scholarly works.  They also show an emerging ability to function linguistically in an environment of native speakers.

CONTENT

Students demonstrate a breadth of knowledge, with depth in some areas, of the literatures and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world (Spain, Latin America, and Hispanics in the United States).  This cultural competence is supported by basic knowledge of historical, political, social, geographic, and economic situations and conditions in the Spanish-speaking world.

SKILLS

Critical Thinking.  Students demonstrate the ability to analyze texts, make connections, compare perspectives, think independently, identify writers′ (and readers′) biases, identify and understand the uses of rhetorical devices, evaluate evidence and identify fallacies, argue in favor or against a particular viewpoint, and coherently synthesize information from diverse sources.

Research.  Students demonstrate an ability to gather, organize, and present information from diverse sources; and an advanced competence in the use of libraries and electronic resources.

Life Skills.  Students demonstrate biliterate and bicultural skills conducive to living and working among diverse populations in the United States and abroad.

Courses

Hispanic Language, Literature and Culture

HISPANIC STUDIES  101  ACCELERATED ELEMENTARY SPANISH A fast­-paced introductory course that prepares students through engaging, meaningful activities that develop real-­world skills and abilities.  The course integrates a wide variety of interactive materials to put language into practice.   Students will learn to create speech; explore the products, practices and perspectives of Hispanic cultures; exchange opinions; and talk, read, and write about people, places, experiences and events.  Class meets five days a week.  Six hours credit.
               Enrollment limited to 20 students.  Staff

HISPANIC STUDIES  103  ADVANCED ELEMENTARY SPANISH – INTRODUCTION TO HISPANIC ART  Computer-based course designed as an overview of major works of art and architecture from Spain and Latin America through a fast-paced grammar and vocabulary review.  The course emphasizes common problems of Spanish grammar for English speakers.  Practice in reading and writing, with emphasis on communicative skills.
               Prerequisite:  Course 101 or a qualifying score on the Department’s placement exam.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  Offered annually.  J. Kushigian, Staff 

HISPANIC STUDIES  106  PRACTICAL SPANISH  An intermediate course designed for students who do not plan to continue the study of Spanish but who wish to improve comprehension and to enhance basic conversational skills.  The focus is on spoken Spanish, including idiomatic expressions, pronunciation, and vocabulary for everyday life.

               Entrance on a qualifying score on the Department's placement exam.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  F. Graziano

HISPANIC STUDIES  121  INTENSIVE INTERMEDIATE SPANISH LANGUAGE REVIEW  A proficiency-oriented review of selected topics of Spanish grammar with primary emphasis on achieving functional ability in speaking, reading and writing in Spanish.  Extensive laboratory work will supplement grammar review with audio and video recordings as well as computer-based assignments.  Students may not receive credit for both this course and Course 121A.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103 or a qualifying score on the Department’s placement exam.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  Offered annually.  Staff

HISPANIC STUDIES  121A  ACCELERATED INTERMEDIATE SPANISH LANGUAGE REVIEW  A proficiency-oriented review of selected topics of Spanish grammar with primary emphasis on achieving functional ability in speaking, reading and writing in Spanish.  Extensive laboratory work will supplement grammar review with audio and video recordings as well as computer-based assignments.  Further development of linguistic skills in Spanish, with emphasis on reading a variety of selections from periodicals and short selections of literature.  This course is particularly recommended for students planning to major or minor in Hispanic Studies.  Students may not receive credit for both this course and Course 121.  Class meets five days a week.  Six hours credit.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103 or a qualifying score on the Department's placement exam.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  Offered annually.  Staff

HISPANIC STUDIES  204  ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IN LATIN AMERICA  An exploration of the inextricable link between ecosystems and humans.  The course focuses on questions of indigenous marginalization, grinding poverty, and racial, gender, and social prejudice that are reflected in the degradation of nature, the abuse of natural resources, and climate change.  Case studies of exploitation or neglect at Latin American mines, slums, and dams are paired with grassroots movements designed to promote profound change.  This is the same course as Environmental Studies 204.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103 or 121, or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  J. Kushigian, Staff 

HISPANIC STUDIES  207  ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION  Language and writing skills are refined to prepare students for upper-division coursework in Hispanic Studies.  Literary and cultural readings, thematic discussions, and interactive computer exercises serve as the basis for grammar review, conversation, and diverse writing assignments.

               Prerequisite:  Course 121 or a qualifying score on the Department's placement exam.  Enrollment limited to 15 students.  Offered annually.  Staff

HISPANIC STUDIES  208  INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY & CULTURAL ANALYSIS  An introduction to the methods and theories used in upper-division analyses of literary and cultural representations.  Skills in writing research papers in Spanish are also developed.  Readings include a selection of texts by representative Hispanic authors in five genres:  poetry, short story, novel, drama, and essay.  Basic theoretical concepts and strategies of analysis are also applied to such texts as testimony, myth, journalism, painting, advertising, film, song lyrics, and chronicles.

               Prerequisite:  Course 207 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  Offered annually second semester.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  Staff

HISPANIC STUDIES  209  ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION FOR BILINGUAL SPEAKERS  This course is for students who learned Spanish primarily outside of an academic context.  The course builds on existing language skills with an emphasis on writing and grammar and helps students acquire a more formal level of Spanish. 

               Enrollment limited to 15 students.  Open to students with a knowledge of Spanish learned in a non-academic context.  This is a designated Writing course.  This course is not open to students who have received credit for Hispanic Studies 207.  J. Rudolph

HISPANIC STUDIES  224  LATINO WRITERS IN THE U.S.  Various works of poetry, prose, and drama by contemporary authors of Hispanic background living and writing in the United States.  Particular attention will be given to the relationship between history, identity, and language in their works.

               Prerequisite:  Course 207 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  Staff

HISPANIC STUDIES  226  PROYECTO COMUNIDAD  This service-learning course offers the opportunity to apply Spanish language skills and to enhance cultural understanding while working in the Hispanic community of New London.  Six hours of service are required weekly.  The community aspects of the course are enhanced by seminar meetings, readings, oral presentations, and written assignments.

               Prerequisite:  Course 207.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This course is not open to students who have received credit for Hispanic Studies 228.  F. Graziano

HISPANIC STUDIES  230  BUSINESS SPANISH FOR GLOBAL COMMUNICATION  Introduction to principles of management, finance, and marketing in international business with a focus on Spain, Latin America, and the Hispanic community in the U.S.  A cultural study that examines linguistic, technological, and psychological approaches to the marketplace.  Emphasis on the practical and communicative, including web page design.

               Prerequisite:  Course 207 or permission of the instructor.  Staff

HISPANIC STUDIES  236  ADVANCED ORAL PROFICIENCY IN SPANISH  Development of conversational skills, including vocabulary enrichment, through intensive practice and oral presentations.  Readings and films provide the basis for class discussions.  Not open to native speakers of Spanish.

               Prerequisite:  Course 207.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  F. Graziano

HISPANIC STUDIES  250, 251  HISPANIC CULTURES  A two-semester survey of Hispanic civilizations and cultures in Spain, Latin America, and the United States.  Lectures by Hispanic Studies faculty and visiting scholars, interdisciplinary readings, feature films and documentaries, introduction to print and internet resources in Spanish, varying class formats and instruction sites, and a service-learning component.

               Prerequisite:  Courses 207 and 208 must be taken prior to or concurrently with the 250, 251 sequence.  Hispanic Cultures is the prerequisite to most courses in the upper division and should therefore be completed as early as possible in one's studies.  For Course 250 the enrollment is limited to 20 students; for Course 251 the enrollment is unlimited.  Offered annually.  Both courses satisfy General Education Area 4.  L. González, F. Graziano

HISPANIC STUDIES  301  MASTERPIECES OF EARLY SPANISH LITERATURE  The origins of Spanish poetry, prose and theater, including a study of the historical and cultural background of the period.  Texts from the first five centuries of the history of Iberian cultures will be examined in relation to such concepts as anonymity/authorship, popular culture, "convivencia" and genre.

               Prerequisite:  Course 250 or permission of the instructor.  Staff

HISPANIC STUDIES  302  CERVANTES  A close reading of Don Quijote de la Mancha and other major works by Miguel de Cervantes in relation to their historical and artistic contexts.  A variety of critical approaches, including the "theory of the novel" as applied to Cervantes' narrative innovations.

               Prerequisite:  Course 250 or permission of the instructor.  Staff

HISPANIC STUDIES  304  DESIRE, VIOLENCE, AND JUSTICE IN GOLDEN AGE POETRY AND THEATER  A comparative thematic approach to works of Spanish Golden Age poetry and drama.  Aspects of social, religious and political life highlighted as background to works by Garcilaso de la Vega, Fray Luis de León, San Juan de la Cruz, Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Calderón de la Barca, Quevedo and Góngora.

               Prerequisite:  Course 250 or permission of the instructor.  Staff

HISPANIC STUDIES  305  ″FLOWERS FROM THE VOLCANO″:  IMPERIAL DISCOURSE, ECO-FEMINISM, AND RESISTANCE IN THE AMERICAS  The Spanish conquest forever changed America and created a ″new world.″  Imperial discourses collided with resistance movements and the emerging voices of oppressed indigenous peoples, women, and mestizos.  This course traces the tensions between their discourses during the colonial period and today, interrogating related struggles for land and self.  This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 305.

               Prerequisite:  Course 251.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  J. Kushigian

HISPANIC STUDIES  306  MYTH, FOLKLORE AND LEGENDS OF SPANISH AMERICA  An interdisciplinary approach to traditions, beliefs, customs, cosmologies, rites, ceremonies, tales, and superstitions as reflected in the literature of Spanish America.  This course explores how myths, legends, and folklore are retold in the essays, poetry and theater of the works of authors including Neruda, Castellanos, Berman, Paz, Borges, and Menchú.

               Prerequisite:  Course 251 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  J. Kushigian

HISPANIC STUDIES  308  CONTEMPORARY HISPANIC DETECTIVE FICTION  The rise of the "whodunit" in contemporary Hispanic narrative and its contrast with classical detective fiction as a context for understanding contemporary Spanish and Latin American culture.  Pertinent theoretical implications and the social and political factors that have contributed to the genre's evolution and success will be introduced.

               Prerequisite:  Course 250 or 251 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Staff

HISPANIC STUDIES  309  LATIN AMERICA IN FILM  Feature films and documentaries from and about Latin America serve as the basis for lectures, discussions, and class projects.  The diverse topics explored through film include indigenous cultures, slavery, revolution, human rights, and a range of cultural and social issues.  The course also introduces strategies of film interpretation.

               Prerequisite:  Course 251 or permission of the instructor.  F. Graziano

HISPANIC STUDIES  310  LITERATURE OF THE HISPANIC CARIBBEAN  Works by major Hispanic Caribbean authors.  An integrated analysis of the socio-cultural contexts and traditions (indigenous, European, African) of this region.  The course notes the influential role of ethnicity, colonialism, gender, and socio-economic development in the formation and interpretation of texts from Puerto Rico, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Central America, Colombia, and Venezuela.

               Prerequisite:  Course 251 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  A. Heredia

HISPANIC STUDIES  311  POETRY AND TRANSLATION WORKSHOP  This course has three purposes:  to enhance understanding and appreciation of contemporary Spanish-language poetry; to learn the basics of poetry-writing and the translation of creative works; and to improve nuanced Spanish-language skills through close readings of poems and poetic prose.  There are no prerequisites, but admission to the course requires a score of 45 or better on the department′s Spanish placement exam.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  F. Graziano

HISPANIC STUDIES  316  RELIGION AND VIOLENCE IN LATIN AMERICA  Lectures, discussions, readings, films, and student projects explore the relation of religion and violence throughout the course of Latin American history.  The many themes and topics treated include human sacrifice, religious aspects of conquest, mortification and martyrdom, torture as ritualized violence, iconography of the crucified Christ, murder of nuns and priests, insurgency and counter-insurgency as holy war, persecution of Jews, and indigenous revolts.  This is the same course as Religious Studies 316.

               Prerequisite:  Course 251 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  F. Graziano

HISPANIC STUDIES  317  YOUTH IN SPANISH AMERICA  This interdisciplinary course focuses on children and teens in Spanish America, including the Hispanic United States.  Topics of study include street children, exploitation, drugs, gangs, child soldiers, prostitution, abuse and neglect, and the cultural, social, political, and economic factors that contribute to adverse situations for youth.

               Prerequisite:  Course 251 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  F. Graziano

HISPANIC STUDIES  318  LATIN NATION:  EXPRESSIONS OF U.S. LATINO IDENTITIES IN THE ARTS AND POPULAR CULTURE  This course focuses on cultural texts such as literature, art, music, and performance to examine U.S. Latino identities from two perspectives:  first, the intersection of race, class, and gender in identity formation, and second, issues of nationality.  This is a joint-listed course with Comparative Race and Ethnicity 318.

               Prerequisite:  Course 251 or permission of the instructor.  Students who register for Comparative Race and Ethnicity 318 may complete assignments in English but must be able to converse in Spanish during the class sessions. Enrollment limited to 30 students.  J. Rudolph

HISPANIC STUDIES  319  CONTEMPORARY SPANISH CINEMA:  BEFORE AND AFTER ALMODÓVAR  An exploration of the evolution of Spanish cinema through comparative study of earlier and more recent films.  Following the early, politically committed films of Ladislao Vajda, Luis Buñuel, and Víctor Erice, recent Spanish directors such as Pedro Almodóvar, Alejandro Amenábar, and Iciar Bollaín have successfully transformed Spanish cinema, captivating a wide audience by representing modern society's struggles and dilemmas.

               Prerequisite:  Course 250 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  L. González

HISPANIC STUDIES  321  LATIN AMERICAN RELIGIONS IN ACTION  An exploration of religious beliefs and practices in everyday life as well as in a range of social, cultural, and political contexts, including  conquest and indigenous resistance, female mysticism, revolution and counter-revolution, poverty and migration, and other social movements.  This is the same course as Religious Studies 321.

               Prerequisite:  Course 251.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  F. Graziano

HISPANIC STUDIES  322  SPAIN IN SEARCH OF ITS IDENTITY  Through a survey of Spanish literature and film ranging from the Middle Ages to the 21st century, this course explores major topics related to the complex Spanish national identity.  Special emphasis on the cultural and religious diversity of the country; its quest for modernity in spite of the persistence of traditional values; and the change of gender roles in Spanish society.

               Prerequisite:  Course 250 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  L. González

HISPANIC STUDIES  324  HISPANICS IN THE U.S.  A historical and cultural survey of Hispanic peoples in the United States, including Mexican Americans in the Southwest, Cuban Americans in Florida, and Puerto Ricans and Dominicans in the Northeast.  The course endeavors to strengthen understanding of Hispanic contributions to the United States and to enhance cross cultural sensitivity by exploring such themes as immigration, marginality, ethnic identity, bicultural expression, and Hispanic cultural achievements.

               Prerequisite:  Course 251 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7.  A. Heredia

HISPANIC STUDIES  325  FOREIGN LANGUAGE METHODOLOGY  Current research on the teaching of foreign languages in the U.S. and elsewhere, with techniques for fostering a communicative environment.  Based on practical and theoretical information, the course analyzes theory of foreign language pedagogy and provides opportunities for practical and creative activities, such as micro-teaching exercises and portfolio production.  This course will be particularly suited to those who are working toward teaching certification or planning graduate study in Spanish.

               Prerequisite:  Course 207 or 314 or permission of the instructor.  Staff

HISPANIC STUDIES  327  REVOLUTION AND COUNTER-REVOLUTION IN SPANISH AMERICA  This interdisciplinary course studies revolutions and military responses in Spanish America.  Case studies include Sendero Luminoso in Peru, the ″Dirty War″ in Argentina, the Zapatistas in Mexico, the FARC in Colombia, the FMLN in El Salvador, the Cuban Revolution, and the Sandinistas and Contras in Nicaragua.

               Prerequisite:  Course 251 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  F. Graziano

HISPANIC STUDIES  329  CARIBBEAN COMMUNITIES IN THE U.S.:  THE CASE OF THE DOMINICAN DIASPORA  Literary and historical texts, visual arts, and performance art serve as vehicles for the analysis of such topics as cultural memory, immigration, trauma, and the formation of transnational identities.  This course examines the role of the U.S. in shaping notions of class and ethnicity in Haiti, Puerto Rico, and Cuba.

               Prerequisite:  Course 251 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  A. Heredia

HISPANIC STUDIES  330  LITERARY IMAGINATION AND THE AFRICAN DIASPORA IN LATIN AMERICA  Through its crucial role in the formation and transformation of Latin American human cultures over the past five centuries, the African diaspora has been the inspiration for an impressive canon of unique literary expressions.  This course examines those expressions and focuses on religious practices, artistic manifestations, and sociohistorical processes portrayed in works from such countries as Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela.  Readings in social history, philosophy, psychology, and poetics provide the theoretical framework for analysis.

               Prerequisite:  Course 251 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  A. Heredia

HISPANIC STUDIES  331  CONTESTING TRADITION:  GENDER, CLASS, AND ETHNICITY IN CONTEMPORARY SPANISH FICTION AND FILM  Through analysis of fiction and film by Almudena Grandes, Pedro Almodóvar, and Benito Zambrano among others, this course explores how Spanish culture contributed to the social environment that enabled the consolidation of progressive policies on gender, class, and immigration.

               Prerequisite:  Course 250.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  L. González

HISPANIC STUDIES  332  BETWEEN ILLUSION AND REALITY:  MASTERWORKS OF SPANISH THEATER I  This course examines the process by which the Classical Spanish Drama was formed in sixteenth and seventeenth century Spain.  Representative works are analyzed as written texts and as performances.  Readings and films of performances include the works of Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, and Calderón de la Barca.

               Prerequisite:  Courses 207 and 208.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Staff

HISPANIC STUDIES  333  U.S. LATINO URBAN YOUTH NARRATIVES  This course will look at how authors have constructed the city as a Latino youth space.  Class readings will pay particular attention to the ways that gender, class, and ethnic/racial identity shape Latino youth experiences in major U.S. cities.  These cities include: New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Tampa, among others.  This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 333.

               Prerequisite:  Course 251.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  J. Rudolph

HISPANIC STUDIES  334  UNDOCUMENTED HISPANIC IMMIGRATION  A multidisciplinary exploration consisting of readings, lectures, discussion, film, guest presentations, and guided research projects on undocumented migration to the United States from Latin America.

               Prerequisite:  Course 251.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  F. Graziano

HISPANIC STUDIES  335  ANDALUSIA IN GOLDEN AGE SPANISH LITERATURE  An exploration of different faces of Andalusia in early modern Spanish literature.  Granada, Sevilla, and Córdoba are the subjects of fiction, plays, and poems.  Authors include Cervantes, who had an intense connection to Sevilla; Andalusian poets and novelists; and playwrights who made Seville a land of passion and betrayal.

               Prerequisite:  Course 250 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  Staff

HISPANIC STUDIES  337  MEDITATIONS ON HISTORY, ARTS AND POLITICS IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN  An exploration of history, politics, and grassroots movements and artistic expression in Latin American and Caribbean societies from the twentieth century to present, through fiction, essays, and visual arts from the twentieth century to contemporary society.  The role of women as literary artists and political subjects is a central component of the course.

               Prerequisite:  Course 251 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  A. Heredia

HISPANIC STUDIES  344f  CROSSING THE SEA:  TRANSATLANTIC DIALOGUE BETWEEN SPAIN AND THE AMERICAS (In Spanish)  This optional section will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Spanish.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing Hispanic Studies/History 344f must concurrently register for Hispanic Studies/History 344.  This is the same course as History 344f.  L. González and L. Garofalo

HISPANIC STUDIES  433, 434  SPECIAL TOPICS

HISPANIC STUDIES  433A, 434A  GROWING UP IN LATIN AMERICA:  THE BILDUNGSROMAN IN LATIN AMERICAN NARRATIVE  An interpretation of Latin American reality through the diverse portraits of youthful development.  A study of the realities of coming of age in Latin America from Mexico to Chile, the confrontation with society and capitalist values and issues of gender, culture, and class struggle.  Works to be examined include those by the following authors:  Isabel Allende, Carlos Fuentes, Elena Poniatowska, and Mario Vargas Llosa.

               Prerequisite:  Course 251 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  J. Kushigian

HISPANIC STUDIES  433B, 434B  SHORT STORIES BY LATIN AMERICAN WOMEN AUTHORS  Authors include Luisa Valenzuela, Rosario Castellanos and Christina Peri Rossi.  Particular attention given to the manner in which these authors and others describe their struggle to assert themselves as women and as writers in Latin America, and how they deal with social, economic and political problems of 20th-century Latin America.

               Prerequisite:  Course 251 or permission of the instructor.  A. Heredia

HISPANIC STUDIES  433C, 434C  CONTEMPORARY SPANISH WOMEN WRITERS  Fiction by Spanish women during the 20th century, from those who started writing under Franco′s censorship to those writing in the new millennium.  Exploration of aesthetic innovations, with a special emphasis on socio-political and cultural issues:  gender and sexual marginality, responses to feminist literary theory, politics of a patriarchal society, and the portrayal of women in modern society.

               Prerequisite:  Course 250 or permission of the instructor.  This is a designated Writing course.  L. González

HISPANIC STUDIES  433F, 434F  CARNIVALESQUE IMAGINATION:  COMEDY AND LAUGHTER IN SPANISH LITERATURE AND FILM  An examination of ″carnival″ as a prevalent aesthetic form in Spanish culture from Francisco de Quevedo and R.M. del Valle Inclán to Pedro Almodóvar.  Emphasis on how comedy, parody, irony, the grotesque, and the inversion of class and gender roles have helped to subvert the traditional status quo in Spain, leading to a new way to understand its national identity.

               Prerequisite:  Course 250.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  L. González

HISPANIC STUDIES  433G, 434G  LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE AND HUMAN RIGHTS  An exploration of  literary and other cultural responses to atrocities committed in Latin America and an examination of the application of human rights principles to such phenomena as state violence, coerced labor, and poverty.  The paradoxical relationship between human atrocities and their aesthetic representations is highlighted in the study of poetry, short stories, novels, political activists' writings and film.  Works produced in Central America, Mexico, and South America are analyzed within the framework outlined above.

               Prerequisite:  Course 251.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  A. Heredia

HISPANIC STUDIES  493, 494  ADVANCED STUDY SEMINARS  HISPANIC STUDIES  493A, 494A  SEMINAR IN ADVANCED SPANISH LANGUAGE, BICULTURAL PROFICIENCY, AND MENTORED RESEARCH  This seminar improves students′ spoken Spanish and enhances bicultural skills conducive to living and working among diverse populations in the United States and abroad.  Students also develop guided research projects on topics pertinent to the Hispanic world.  The course is designed for students who have previously studied abroad in a Spanish-speaking country; others may be admitted, by permission of the instructor, with a score of 45 or above on the department′s Spanish placement exam.

               Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  F. Graziano

HISPANIC STUDIES  493B, 494B  HISPANIC ORIENTALISM:  EAST MEETS WEST IN A CLASH OF LANGUAGE, DESIRE, AND POWER  An analysis of the public and private exchanges that deal with the Orient and Orientalism in Spanish and Spanish American literature.  Through detailed reading of some of the principal texts of the three Spanish cultural traditions (Arab, Christian, and Jewish), we will examine the origin, engagement, and proliferation of these exchanges in poetry, narrative, history, and social and legal discourse of texts from Spain and Latin America.  Clash, fusion, and resistance anchor the methodological approach to the field of Orientalism from this perspective.

               Prerequisite:  Courses 250 and 251 or permission of the instructor.  Open to juniors and  seniors.  This is a designated Writing course.  J. Kushigian

HISPANIC STUDIES  493G, 494G SPANGLISH AS IDENTITY  An examination of the relationship between language and identity from a socio-cultural and linguistic perspective.  The course explores the tensions around power, privilege, and race with respect to bilingual/bicultural experiences of Latin@s and latinidad in the United States.  Students engage questions of politics and national, as well as linguistic identity.

               Prerequisite:  A 300-level course in Hispanic Studies, or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  J. Rudolph

In English

HISPANIC STUDIES  110  INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE AND MIND  This is the same course as English/German Studies/Linguistics 110.  Refer to the Linguistics listing for a course description.

HISPANIC STUDIES  220  INTRODUCTION TO LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES  Through readings, lectures, discussion, and film, this course surveys essential topics in Latin American studies.  Included are poverty, migration and emigration, dictatorship, revolution, religion, race, and popular cultures, among other topics.  Methods in interdisciplinary research are also introduced.  The course is taught in English.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors, or with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  F. Graziano

HISPANIC STUDIES  344  CROSSING THE SEA:  TRANSATLANTIC DIALOGUE BETWEEN SPAIN AND THE AMERICAS  An interdisciplinary exploration of the permanent, problematic, and enriching dialogue between Spain and the Americas.  This transatlantic interaction began in 1492, reached a breaking point with the 19th century revolutions, and continues to shape the conflicts of our global moment.  Through the analysis of historical texts, literary artifacts, and films, the course considers key issues such as conquest, slavery, modernity, post-colonialism, and immigration.  Sources include Las Casas, Carlos Fuentes, Bolívar, Martí, and Guillermo del Toro.  This is the same course as Comparative Race and Ethnicity/History 344.  This course may include an optional section that will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Spanish.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen with permission of the instructors.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  L. González and L. Garofalo

HISPANIC STUDIES  291, 292  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

HISPANIC STUDIES  391, 392  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

HISPANIC STUDIES  491, 492  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

HISPANIC STUDIES  497-498  HONORS STUDY