Italian



Associate Professor:  Sica; Visiting Instructors:  Gula, Patton, Riccardi; Lecturer:  Morelli; Professor Proctor, acting chair for Fall 2013-Spring 2014

The Major in Italian Studies

The major in Italian Studies consists of nine courses beyond Courses 101 and 102.  These must include 201, 202, and 302; either 250 or 260; one 300- or 400- level course in Renaissance Italian literature and culture; one 300- and one 400- level course in modern or contemporary Italian literature and culture, both conducted in Italian.  Under exceptional circumstances, equivalent courses may be substituted with permission of the department.

Students majoring in Italian Studies are required to spend at least one semester during the junior year in Italy.  Under exceptional circumstances, the department may approve a summer program in Italy or the United States.

Advisers:  R. Proctor, P. Sica

The Minor in Italian Studies

The minor in Italian Studies consists of five courses beyond Courses 101 and 102.  These must include 201, 202, and 302; either 250 or 260; and at least one course at the 300- or 400- level conducted in Italian.  Under exceptional circumstances, equivalent courses may be substituted with permission of the department.

Students majoring or minoring in Italian Studies are encouraged to complement the program offered by the Italian Department with appropriate courses from other disciplines.

Learning Goals in the Italian Studies Major

The major in Italian Studies consists of 9 courses beyond Elementary Italian, and includes language course at the Intermediate and Advanced level, and courses on Dante, the Renaissance, and modern and contemporary Italian literature and culture.

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

By the end of the course of study at Connecticut College, including at least one semester of study in Italy, students majoring in Italian will have reached an advanced knowledge of Modern Standard Italian.  Students will be able to express themselves fluently and effectively in a wide range of social, academic and professional situations.  Students will be able to read and understand complex literary and technical texts on both concrete and abstract topics.  Students will be able to produce different types of texts (descriptive, discursive, argumentative, and persuasive) in a well organized and cohesive manner.  Students with no prior knowledge of the language will start by taking courses at the elementary level (Italian 101 and 102) and progress through the intermediate series (Italian 201 and Italian 202) up to the upper intermediate more specialized courses (Italian 250 and Italian 260) which focus respectively on developing advanced writing skills and advanced oral skills as well enriching students′ vocabulary with a wide range of specialized terms and expressions.  Finally, students will be able to develop an appreciation for the linguistic variety of Italy by recognizing some of the main regional language varieties spoken across the country.

CULTURAL PROFICIENCY AND LIFE STYLE

The emphasis shifts in courses at the 300 and 400 level from mastery of the Italian language to mastery of the kind of critical thinking and historical and cultural knowledge one needs to understand and appreciate Italy.  Students who take upper-level courses in Italian will be able to analyze literary texts, films, and images after being exposed to various forms of critical reading.  They will know basic methods for doing research, such as how to search for articles and books, and how to write a bibliography.  And they will be able to write short critical essays.  At the end of their Italian studies Connecticut College students will have acquired a broad knowledge of the major periods of Italian history and culture.  Inspired by this knowledge, they will have also gained a love of Italy, and a desire to her language and culture a part of their lives.

Courses

Italian Language and Literature

ITALIAN  101, 102  ELEMENTARY ITALIAN  Promotes basic understanding, speaking, reading, and writing while presenting Italian culture through video documents, literature, songs, and films.  Three meetings a week, and three hours a week of language laboratory.

               Open only to students with less than two years of Italian at entrance.  Enrollment limited to 20 students per section.  F. Morelli, C. Patton, R. Proctor, E. Riccardi, P. Sica

ITALIAN  201  INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I:  SGUARDO SULL'ITALIA  Develops basic language skills through grammar review and vocabulary building while introducing topics in Italian culture such as fashion and design, regional cultures, travel, migration, the American influence in Italy, and the role of Italy in Europe.  Resources for class activities vary from year to year, and may include films, videos songs, journal articles, and literature.

               Prerequisite:  Recommended to students with three years of Italian at entrance, or Courses 101 and 102.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  Offered every year, first semesterThis is a designated Writing course.  P. Sica

ITALIAN  202  INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II:  PASSIONI ITALIANE  Develops proficiency in listening, reading, speaking, and writing through topics in Italian culture such as regional traditions and food, youth culture, opera, art, sport, literature, cinema, and politics.  May include discussions, presentations, compositions, translations, comprehension exercises, and revisions of complex grammatical patterns.  Provides preparation for Italian upper level courses.

               Prerequisite:  Course 201 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  Offered every year, second semester.  This is a designated Writing course.  P. Sica

ITALIAN  250  ADESSO SCRIVIAMO!  WRITING IN ITALIAN  Writing skills in Italian are refined through the analysis of advanced syntactic structures, texts of different styles and genres, and exercises of increasing complexity for both creative and academic writing.  Students will utilize advanced skills in reading, grammar, and composition to improve overall language proficiency.

               Prerequisite:  Course 202 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  F. Morelli

ITALIAN  260  ATTUALITÀ IN ITALIA:  CONVERSAZIONE  Aims at refining oral expression in Italian through discussions of current events, social issues and Italian politics.  Extensive exposure to Italian media provides students with an understanding of the Italian perspective on current topics.  Essays and oral presentations will promote practice for advanced speaking and writing skills.

               Prerequisite:  Course 202 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  F. Morelli

ITALIAN  302f  DANTE  This optional section will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental texts in Italian.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing Course 302f must concurrently register for Course 302.  Formerly Italian 401f; cannot receive credit for both courses.  R. Proctor

ITALIAN  315  THE ITALIAN LANGUAGE:  HISTORY, USAGE, AND STRUCTURE  A study of the linguistic structure and usage of Modern Standard Italian and other dialects spoken in Italy.  The course considers the development of the Italian language from its Latin origins to the present day, through important historical events and literary works.

               Prerequisite:  Course 202 or permission of the instructor.  Either Course 250 or 260 is recommended for students who have not completed their junior year/semester in Italy.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  F. Morelli

ITALIAN  316  CULTURAL IDENTITY IN ITALY AND ADJACENT GEOGRAPHICAL AREAS  Study of identity formation in verbal and visual works representing Italian unity during Risorgimento, the South (e.g. questione meridionale and mafia), and the Mediterranean area.  Particular emphasis on diverse conceptions of regionalism, nationalism, diaspora, gender, and class.  Authors may include Garibaldi, Serao, Rosi, and Ben Jelloun.  This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 316.

               Prerequisite:  Course 202 or permission of the instructor.  Either Course 250 or 260 is recommended for students who have not completed their junior year/semester in Italy.  Offered alternating years.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  P. Sica

ITALIAN  317  CONTEMPORARY ITALIAN LITERATURE AND FILM  Survey of dominant trends in Italian literature and film since the 1950s in their cultural and historical context, with an emphasis on questions of identity, gender, and aesthetics.  Writers and film directors may include Pier Vittorio Tondelli, Amelia Rosselli, Salah Methnani, Gabriele Muccino, and Ferzan Ozpetek.

               Prerequisite:  Course 202 or permission of the instructor.  Either Course 250 or 260 is recommended for students who have not completed their junior year/semester in Italy.  Offered alternating years.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  P. Sica

Prerequisite for all 400-level courses in Italian (except 493, 494):  one 300-level course or permission of the instructor

ITALIAN  405f  MODERNISMS AND MODERNITY  This optional section will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental texts in Italian.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing Course 405f must concurrently register for Italian 405.

ITALIAN  406  MODERNISMS AND MODERNITY  This course covers topics similar to those considered in course 405, but is conducted in Italian.  Students may not receive credit for both courses 405 and 406.

               Prerequisite:  One 300-level course in Italian or permission of the instructor.  Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  P. Sica

ITALIAN  408f  THE RENAISSANCE IN ITALY  This optional section will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental texts in Italian.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing Course 408f must concurrently register for Course 408.  R. Proctor

ITALIAN  409f  THE LATE RENAISSANCE:  ART, SCIENCE, AND RELIGION  This optional section will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental texts in Italian.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing Course 409f must concurrently register for Course 409.

               Open to students with three years of Italian or permission of the instructor.  R. Proctor

ITALIAN  416f  ITALIAN FILM AND LITERATURE  This optional section will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental texts in Italian.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing Course 416f must concurrently register for Course 416.  P. Sica

ITALIAN  421  TOPICS IN ITALIAN CULTURE:  RESEARCH SEMINAR  Topics in Italian culture introduced through literature, films, and art and examined with pertinent historical, sociological, and theoretical materials.  These topics may include travel, migration, youth culture, food, and women′s movements.  In Italian, but secondary readings and occasional guest lectures may be in English.  Possible field trip.  This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 421.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  P. Sica

ITALIAN  422  MIGRANT WRITERS IN ITALY  An introduction to the cultural changes taking place in Italy, as reflected in the work of contemporary authors who migrated from other countries.  Emphasis on the thematic and stylistic impact of migrant writers’ literary and cinematic works on contemporary Italian literature.  This is the same course as Comparative Race and Ethnicity 422

               This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  M. Gula

ITALIAN  493, 494  ADVANCED STUDY SEMINAR

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others with permission of the instructor Staff

In English

For courses taught in English, Italian Studies majors and minors will be required to do the reading in Italian.  Moreover, if these courses include an extra hour taught in Italian, Italian Studies majors and minors will be required to attend it.

ITALIAN  216  IN SEARCH OF BEAUTY  A discussion of the Renaissance's understanding of beauty and its relationship to beauty and to truth.  Readings of Italian Renaissance authors combined with on site study of architecture, painting, and sculpture in Florence, the birthplace of the Renaissance.  This course is taught in the SATA Florence program only.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  R. Proctor

ITALIAN  302  DANTE  A study of The Divine Comedy.  This course may include an optional section that will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Italian.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Formerly Italian 401; cannot receive credit for both courses.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  R. Proctor

ITALIAN  405  MODERNISMS AND MODERNITY  An introduction to recent critical debates on Modernism and modernity, and an analysis of works by Modernist Italian authors, their precursors, and their followers.  Emphasis on the relation between literature and the following:  visual arts, sexual politics, and history.  Some reference to Modernist movements developed outside of Italy.  Authors may include Sibilla Aleramo, F. T. Marinetti, Benedetta, Italo Svevo, Antonia Pozzi, Eugenio Montale, and others.  This course may include an optional section that will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Italian.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen with permission of the instructor.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Students may not receive credit for both Courses 405 and 406.  P. Sica

ITALIAN  408  THE RENAISSANCE IN ITALY  The course explores one of the most creative periods in human history through the study of the lives and works of famous Renaissance artists, writers, and thinkers.  It investigates the material and spiritual environment that fostered their creativity, including the tension between the Judeo-Christian and classical inheritances.  This course may include an optional section that will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Italian.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  R. Proctor

ITALIAN  409  THE LATE RENAISSANCE:  ART, SCIENCE, AND RELIGION  A study of Michelangelo (1475-1564) and Galileo (1564-1642), including readings of Michelangelo's poetry and Galileo's prose.  This course may include an optional section that will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, passed/not passed marking.  Students may not receive credit for both Freshman Seminar 148C and Italian 409.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 8 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  R. Proctor

ITALIAN  416  ITALIAN FILM AND LITERATURE:  FROM NEOREALISM TO THE PRESENT  Topics in Italian culture explored through cinema and literature.  Films will be discussed in relation to the literary works that inspired them, or in tandem with pertinent literary, cultural, and theoretical materials.  Films by Federico Fellini, Liliana Cavani, Pierpaolo Pasolini, Michalangelo Antonioni, Francesca Archibugi, and others.  This selection may be supplemented with films by Italo-American directors such as Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Scorsese.  Italian majors and minors are required to read the literature in Italian.  Students may not receive credit for both Courses 416 and 417.  This course may include an optional section that will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Italian.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  P. Sica

ITALIAN  291, 292  INDIVIDUAL STUDY  Independent work on a specific topic or project with a selected faculty member.  Course may be taken for either two or four credits.

ITALIAN  391, 392  INDIVIDUAL STUDY  Independent work on a specific topic or project with a selected faculty member.  Course may be taken for either two or four credits.

ITALIAN  491, 492  INDIVIDUAL STUDY  Independent work on a specific topic or project with a selected faculty member.  Course may be taken for either two or four credits.

ITALIAN  497-498  HONORS STUDY