Sociology



Professor:  Gay; Associate Professors:  Harris, Jafar; Assistant Professor:  Campos-Holland;  Professor Flores, chair

The Major in Sociology

The major consists of at least nine courses, including 103, 325, 354, and at least one 400-level course.

               Advisers:  R. Flores, R. Gay, C. Harris, A. Jafar

The Minor in Sociology

The minor consists of five courses in sociology:  103; 325 or 354; two additional 200-level courses; and one 400-level course.

               Advisers:  R. Flores, R. Gay, C. Harris, A. Jafar

Learning Goals for the Sociology Major

SOCIOLOGICAL LITERACY

  • Students who complete the major should be able to articulate orally and in writing:
    • Significant issues and approaches in sociological theory
    • The sociological contours of actual places and populations in the US and abroad and the relationships between them
    • Familiarity with the major fields of sociology, including stratification, race and ethnicity, migration, globalization, social movements, religion, family, gender and sexuality, urban studies and public policy.

METHODOLOGICAL FLUENCY

  • Students who complete the major should be:
    • Familiar with a range of quantitative and qualitative approaches to sociological analysis
    • Able to read and assess general interest publications on sociological topics
    • Able to grasp and evaluate findings in professional sociological research publications

SOCIOLOGICAL CITIZENSHIP

  • Students who complete the major should be able to:
    • Apply relevant concepts to social and political issues of contemporary and historical importance in actual societies
    • Be active citizens informed by the study of sociology

SOCIOLOGICAL SCHOLARSHIP

  • Students who complete the major should have the opportunity to become engaged in actual sociological research through advanced coursework, honors theses, individual studies and field work, and collaboration with members of the faculty

Courses

SOCIOLOGY  102  SOCIOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO SOCIAL PROBLEMS  An analysis of sociological approaches to the understanding of social problems and social policy and of vital issues facing American society.

               Enrollment limited to 40 students per section.  This course satisfies General Education Area 3.  Staff

SOCIOLOGY  103  INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY  A study of the basic principles underlying the functioning of human society.  Special emphasis will be given to social interaction, social structure, and social change.

               Enrollment limited to 25 students per section.  This course satisfies General Education Area 3.  Staff

SOCIOLOGY  203  IMMIGRATION IN AN URBAN CONTEXT  An examination of questions of immigration through a focus on theories of immigrant incorporation, and patterns of immigrant employment and settlement.  Special attention given to immigration trends that occurred after the Hart-Cellar Act of 1965, which abolished the country of origin quota and increased the number of immigrants to the United States.  This is a service learning course which integrates community service and course readings and discussions.  All students will be required to contribute forty hours of service over the course of the semester.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  R. Flores

SOCIOLOGY  205  RACE, ETHNICITY, AND BASEBALL IN THE U. S.  An examination of the dynamics of race and ethnicity as reflected in the development of professional baseball both on and off the field.  Focus will be on the exclusion and later reintegration of African Americans, baseball's role in immigrant assimilation, and the recent internationalization of the game.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  R. Flores

SOCIOLOGY  208  RACE, GENDER, AND THE MASS MEDIA  An examination of the relationship between U.S. media and the social construction of race, gender, and sexuality in understanding the media′s role in perpetuating or challenging racial stereotypes.  Specifically, this course explores how racial minorities, men and women, and LGBTQ Americans are represented in media as well as how these groups function as media consumers and creators.  Topics include:  women and minorities in classical and modern cinema, representations of race and genderin advertising, images of minorities on network television, the stereotyping of gays and lesbians in film and television, and the influence of hip-hop culture.  This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 209.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  C. Harris

SOCIOLOGY  209  THE SOCIOLOGY OF SOCIAL MOVEMENTS  This course examines the role of social movements in the complex processes of social change.  Similarly, it looks at how various sociological theories explain movement emergence, successes and failures, and how these movements rise and decline.  We will also discuss the nature of power and inequality and the multiple ways that social movements attempt to intervene in our society to affect them.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Staff

SOCIOLOGY  210  GENDER AND MEDIA  An exploration of the social construction of gender relations and gender identities through various media (TV, print journalism, advertisements, music, literature, and films).  Particular attention given to how gender identity is constructed over time and how it is constructed across different groups of people (racial, ethnic, and cross-cultural).  The globalization of media and its effects on gender relations and gender identity will also be considered.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103 and intermediate proficiency in any foreign language.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  A. Jafar

SOCIOLOGY  211  RACE, CLASS, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY    An examination of  race, class, gender, and sexuality as socially constructed relations of difference.  The course considers systems of inequality that structure identities, opportunities, and social outcomes through both micro and macro institutions such as media, education, family, culture, and law.
               Prerequisite:  Course 103.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Staff

SOCIOLOGY  212  SEX, GENDER, AND SOCIETY  What is the difference between sex and gender?  How do we act out, perform, recreate gender?  This course is designed to familiarize students with the prominent discourses and major issues related to sex stratification.  It examines how notions of masculinity and femininity evolve and how they affect social reality in such spheres as culture, work, politics, and the family.  This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 211.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  A. Jafar

SOCIOLOGY  213  GENDER THEORY  An introduction to gender theory.  Theoretical concepts related to gender theory, such as social construction, standpoint, and intersectionality.  New directions in gender theory pertaining to race and ethnicity, colonialism, globalization, and sexuality.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Staff

SOCIOLOGY  215  DRUGS AND SOCIETY  The study of the use and regulation of psychoactive drugs from a sociological perspective with a focus on the social construction of psychoactive drugs, research methodology, patterns and theories of drug use and abuse, the farming, production and distribution of psychoactive drugs in a global context, and drugs and social control.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  A. Campos-Holland

SOCIOLOGY  216  SOCIETY IN AN AGE OF CLIMATE CHANGE  An examination of  the debate over the existence and causes of global climate change and the embedded social, economic, and political meanings.  The course explores current and projected global effects of climate change and how these affect and exacerbate social inequalities based on race, sex/gender, and social class, both nationally and internationally.  It further examines the steps that communities and nations are and are not taking to promote more sustainable ways of living and what these choices mean for future survival.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Staff

SOCIOLOGY  223  ETHNIC AND RACE RELATIONS  Ethnic and racial groups analyzed according to historical, cultural, and social conditions; the racial and national composition of the U.S. population; cross-national consideration of group interaction patterns; the social structure of racism and minority status.  This is the same course as Comparative Race and Ethnicity 223.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Staff

SOCIOLOGY  224  URBAN SOCIOLOGY  An introduction to the major themes in urban sociology through a focus on the city as a contested space and  a site for contestation.  The course considers various cities and historical periods emphasizing the struggles that have emerged around three key points of resistance:  economic power, racial domination, and the relationship to nature and the environment.  This is the same course as Environmental Studies 224.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103, Environmental Studies 110, Environmental Studies 111 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 25 students.  S. Colom

SOCIOLOGY  227  DEFIANCE AND SOCIAL CONTROL  Deviant behavior is an act that violates a norm and social control is a reaction to regulate deviant behavior.  This course engages in an analysis of deviance, with a focus on the social construction of deviance, theoretical perspectives and research methodology, past/contemporary deviance, shifts in morality, and social control.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  A. Campos-Holland

SOCIOLOGY  230  THE SOCIOLOGY OF DEATH AND DYING  An examination of death and dying as personal and societal issues.  Death will be examined from a lifespan perspective, with emphasis on how life is enhanced through knowledge of death.  Course participants are assumed to have a desire to understand better what death means to people growing up within today's society; a willingness to confront their personal concerns and fears about dying; and an interest in helping others cope more effectively with loss, grief, and bereavement. 

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Staff

SOCIOLOGY  240  THE SOCIOLOGY OF AGING  A multidisciplinary approach to the study of aging.  Students consider sociological, psychological, and physical factors and their impact on the aged population, families, and health care delivery systems in the United States.  The course addresses social work values and ethics in working with the aging population and their social support systems, with special focus on populations ″at risk″ and the promotion of social and economic justice.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Staff

SOCIOLOGY  262  FAMILY ANALYSIS AND LIFE STYLES  Family as a structural basis for social order; dynamic role relations within the family unit and interaction between the family and the broader social network; dating, courtship, marriage, socialization, alternative life styles; and the future of the family from a theoretical and empirical perspective.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Staff

SOCIOLOGY  293  SOCIOLOGY OF INEQUALITY  An examination of social stratification, which is the system by which society ranks categories of people into a hierarchy, resulting in systems of social inequality in which some enjoy greater power and resources than others.  The nature and function of inequality based on race, class, gender, and sexuality will be considered in relation to social institutions such as family, education, work, and media.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  C. Harris

SOCIOLOGY  310  RACIAL IDENTITY IN AMERICA  An examination of the ways in which racial identities are formed and the social factors that shape our identities and interactions with one another.  Emphasis on applications to intergroup relations and the resolution of conflict within such relationships.  Specific topics include stages of racial identity development, how racial identities affect social policy, questions of racial authenticity, and how racial identity intersects with issues of class, gender, and sexuality.  This is the same course as Comparative Race and Ethnicity 310.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103 and one 200-level sociology course.  Enrollment limited to 25 students.  C. Harris

SOCIOLOGY  325  FOUNDATIONS AND DEVELOPMENT OF SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY  A study of the origins of sociological theory in the context of 19th-century Europe and the development of sociology as an analysis of industrial and post-industrial societies.  Special emphasis on the relationships of contemporary theory to the works of Marx, Durkheim, and Weber.

               Prerequisite:  Open to junior and seniors who have taken Course 103, or with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Staff

SOCIOLOGY  333, 334  SELECTED TOPICS

SOCIOLOGY  354  METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS  An examination of the research process in sociology.  Topics covered include:  the development of a research design, methods of data collection and basic analysis, problems of measurement and bias.  Projects will involve problem formulation, organization, analysis and presentation of data.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103.  Enrollment limited to 25 students.  R. Gay

SOCIOLOGY  364  URBAN PROBLEMS  Integration of service in community settings with the intellectual study of sociology.  Students will serve as volunteers in a non-profit or advocacy group dealing with a specific urban problem.  Two hours class meeting plus a minimum of six hours community service per week.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103 and one 200-level course or above, or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  Offered second semester.  Staff

SOCIOLOGY  400  THE SOCIOLOGY OF GLOBALIZATION  An analysis of recent processes of globalization.  How globalization is perceived and resisted.  A focus on how globalization affects corporations, nation-states, workers, social inequality, immigration, popular culture, and other aspects of society.  This is the same course as Gender and Women's Studies 400.

               Prerequisite:  Open to juniors and seniors who have taken Course 103, and to others with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Staff

SOCIOLOGY  405  URBAN POVERTY AND PUBLIC POLICY  This course examines the nature and causes of urban poverty by surveying theories of poverty and their policy implications.  Special attention is given to the role of education, employment and family status, gender and race, metropolitan location, and global economic restructuring.  The goal of this course is to understand both the evolution of intellectual thought and practical solutions for reducing and eliminating poverty in American cities.

               Prerequisite:  Open to juniors and seniors who have taken Course 103, and to others with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Staff

SOCIOLOGY  406  POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY  A comparative look at sociological views of the state, political economy, oppression, and resistance, examining  theories that serve as a basis for contemporary social organization, as well as critical perspectives.  Tying these views together, students will be asked to consider the complex ways that humans strive for democratic ideals and under what institutional conditions those ideals might be met.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Staff

SOCIOLOGY  408  MIDDLE CLASS MINORITIES  Race and class in society examined through a focus on the middle class racial minority groups.  Topics include:  historical development, racial parity, race relations within the middle class, attitudes and ideologies, intra-racial class relations.

               Prerequisite:  Open to juniors and seniors who have taken Course 103, and to others with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Staff

SOCIOLOGY  414  POST-AUTHORITARIAN BRAZIL  An examination of trends and processes since the transition to democracy in the late 1970s and early 1980s.  Topics include democratization, social movements, economic restructuring, violence, and religion.  Emphasis on ethnography and oral history. This course may include an optional section, that will meet outside of class to discuss supplemental readings in Portuguese.  Students participating in the section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.

               Prerequisite:  Open to juniors and seniors who have taken Course 103, and to others with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  R. Gay

SOCIOLOGY  414f  POST-AUTHORITARIAN BRAZIL  (In Portuguese)  This optional section will regularly meet with the professor outside of class to discuss supplemental texts in Portuguese.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing Course 414f must concurrently register for Course 414.  R. Gay

SOCIOLOGY  419  PUNISHMENT AND SOCIETY  An exploration of howsocial forces shape formal social control in society.  The course examines major historical changes in punishment, the functions of punishment, and issues of punishment and social inequality.  A critical analysis of America's mass imprisonment era and its impact on the economy, politics, communities, and families.

               Prerequisite:  Open to juniors and seniors who have taken Course 103, and to others with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  A. Campos-Holland

SOCIOLOGY  420  FAMILY VIOLENCE  An introduction to the study of family violence.  A focus on issues related to child abuse, gender violence, and elder abuse in families, as well as institutionalized violence targeting the family.  An examination of the relationship between the domestic and public realm, ideology of the family, types of violence, and methods of intervention.

               Prerequisite:  Open to juniors and seniors who have taken Course 103, and to others with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Staff

SOCIOLOGY  424  GENOCIDE AND RESISTANCE:  EXAMINING THE NATIVE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE THROUGH PARTICIPATORY ACTION RESEARCH  An exploration of the contemporary condition of Native Americans in the United States as a function of a history of forced removal, assimilation, and genocidal policies, countered by Native resistance movements for self-determination.  The course is taught off-campus and includes a collaborative research project with local Nations.  This is the same course as Comparative Race and Ethnicity 424.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103 and permission of instructor.  Enrollment limited to 10 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 3 and is a designated Writing course.  R. Flores

SOCIOLOGY  493, 494  ADVANCED STUDY SEMINARS  The topics are subject to annual change.

SOCIOLOGY  291, 292  INDIVIDUAL STUDY  This is a designated Writing course.

SOCIOLOGY  391, 392  INDIVIDUAL STUDY  This is a designated Writing course.

SOCIOLOGY  491, 492  INDIVIDUAL STUDY  This is a designated Writing course.

SOCIOLOGY  395, 396  FIELD WORK  Supervised field work.  Students will work 8-10 hours per week under the direction of a faculty member and will write a term paper analyzing the experience from a theoretical perspective.  Except in unusual circumstances, the course may be taken only once.

               Prerequisite:  Students anticipating enrollment should contact an appropriate instructor no later than three weeks before the end of the semester preceding the anticipated enrollment.  Approval by the department is required.

SOCIOLOGY  497-498  HONORS STUDY  This is a designated Writing course.