James Austin



Contact James Austin
Email: jfaus@conncoll.edu
Mailbox: 5284
Office: 312 Blaustein Humanities
Phone: (860) 439-2560
Fax: (860) 439-5340

James Austin, Associate Professor of French and Film Studies

Associate Professor of French and Film Studies

Joined Connecticut College: 2003

Education
B.A., Pomona College; École Normale Supérieure, Ancien Pensionnaire Étranger; Yale University, Ph.D., M. Phil., M.A.

Specializations
Proust
French film

James Austin, Associate Professor of French and Film, French Department ChairJames Austin, associate professor of French, came to Connecticut College in 2003. Prior to this he divided his time between New Haven, where he completed his graduate degree, and Paris, where he lived and studied for five years, and to which he returns often to take advantage of the city’s film archives and libraries.

His book, Proust, Pastiche, and the Postmodern, or, Why Style Matters (Bucknell University Press, 2003) www.amazon.com/Proust-Pastiche-Postmodern-Style-Matters/dp/1611484103, traces the practice of pastiche in France from its early incarnations as a classroom exercise, to a performative textuality that retroactively created past writerly styles and that denounced and undermined coercive political rhetoric, to its place within postmodernism and the cinema. Currently, he is preparing a monograph on the films of Chris Marker.

Austin lectures frequently on Proust and on film in the United States and internationally.

Austin has also written on the construction of French identity in the digital French heritage films of 2001, “Digitizing Frenchness in 2001: On a ‘Historic’ Moment in the French Cinema,” French Cultural Studies, 15 (3), October 2004: 281-299.

Professor Austin’s classes at Connecticut College include: Cities on the Screen: Constructing Urban Space in the Cinema (in English); Espaces Urbains: La ville au cinéma (in French); New Wave Film: Then and Now; History / Story: On the Grand and the Intimate in French Cinema; and Historicizing France: Politics, Culture, Literature.

Visit the French department website.