Synergy and Snow

- The Experience, Mike Wipper '17

Synergy and Snow

"Synergy" by Frances Pratt stands tall and strong in the face of storm Juno, or whatever I've noticed people calling it on Facebook. This photo was taken before the full force of the storm presented itself, with classes not yet cancled and people unsure the full extent of what was to come. The peaceful skies began to grow darker and darker and soon the winds picked up aswell. The storm was coming ... You could just feel it!

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Snow angels in a blizzard

- The Experience, Laura Cianciolo '16

Snow angels in a blizzard

Today a couple of my friends and I grabbed brunch in Harris and trekked over to Tempel Green, all of us clad in at least three layers of snow pants. We fell back into a fluffy three feet of snow and made snow angels until we were all too cold to move. Afterward, we retreated to a friend's room for hot chocolate, popcorn, and lots of blankets. 

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Let It Snow!

- The Experience, Mike Wipper '17

Let It Snow!

I waited till nightfall to really get the full scale of the recent snow storm. There's something about checking out the snow at night that really enhances the scale and makes the white-crusted landscape that much grander. There's something about the darkness and the inability to discern anything more than just a white expanse, tinted gold by the street lights, that really made me think just how much snow fell upon our little Connecticut Campus.

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Snowpocalypse continued: sledding in the Arbo

- The Experience, Kirsten Forrester '17

A student sleds down a hill in the snow

Being from Vermont, I’ve had my fair share of sledding experiences. But sledding today in the Arbo has got to be one of the best. Students from all over campus congregated on the big hill, laughing and sharing the random objects brought for sledding, a variety of accessories that included skis, snowboards, cardboard boxes, trays borrowed from the dining hall and, or course, actual sleds.

We all worked together to pack the feet of powder down into a trail, and then took turns going down, giving each other pushes to gain momentum. People tried all sorts of techniques including standing up on trays and hooking sleds together to form a long train. It was most definitely one of my best Conn College experiences to date.

And the best part: it’s still snowing! 

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It's the snowpocalypse!

- The Experience, Kirsten Forrester '17

Students walk out of their dorm and into 20 inches of snow

It’s the snowpacolypse! When leaving my dorm this morning, I was greeted with a wall of snow. Forging our way through in order to get to Harris, my friends and I were delighted in the dramatically changed scenery, so much so that the first thing my friend did was jump into the snow and make a snow angel.

Banks of snow up to my knees are everywhere; haphazard piles and trails wind their way through the campus as we embarked on the cold trek to the dining hall. Classes have been canceled for the day, and I hear the shouts and laughter outside my window as students, reverting into our child-like selves, play in the snow.

My friends and I have signed out our house's sled and later today, we will take to the Arbo, the most popular place for sledding on campus. Sledding down the hill in the Arboretum has been on my Conn Coll bucket list since I arrived in my first year and I just cannot wait. Snow days are the best. 

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Declaring Majors

- The Experience, Anique Ashraf '17

I declared my majors the other week. This is how it happens: You walk into the middle of Tempel Green, spin around in a circle 10 times, shouting your major and adviser while the registrar sits 10 feet away, ringing her bell, asking you to be louder.

The above is decidedly not true. It's just something a professor told me when I came to her with the declaration that I was finally, after months of indecision, declaring two decisive majors. She looked me up and down; I was excited, like I was declaring a big secret. It really is not that big of a deal. She sarcastically joked that I was making a ritual out of it; most students get so stressed about majors, they forget about classes. I agree with her now, I think.

After declaring my majors, I felt no difference. No history or art god descended from the heavens to bless me or take me into their secret society. On paper, I simply declared a major, which did make me feel better. I had goals to work toward.

I think the reason this professor said this to me is because she could see the fear in my eyes. Declaring your major sounds like such a big deal. It seems like you're setting yourself up in life for something so specific. Like now, I can't be anything but a historian, and I'm restricted. All these things are just untrue; I'm still taking classes I want to take, whether they relate to my major or not. I'm working with people I like working with, whether they fall into my department or not. This is what makes a small college like Conn special — because of the high number of professors, you really can, even within the confines of your major, blaze your own trail.

So I went up to Tempel Green, signed my declaration form and spun in a circle anyway, content in the knowledge that I was still free. Majors don't restrict you — fear does.

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Working with the space

- The Experience, Rebecca Seidemann '18

In my two-dimensional art class, we've been learning how to create drawings that appear more full. A lot of our still life paintings were "floating" in the middle of the page with only a thin table line to spruce up the background. Our professor has been stressing that we should add more to the drawings so that they are more interesting, or draw the things we see behind our still lifes. Despite her gentle nagging, the class as a whole wasn't really getting the concept.

To solve the issue, our professor came up with a creative way to intervene in our bad habits. She took us down to the Lyman Allyn Museum, a fine arts museum adjacent to campus with which the College has a working relationship. First, we did some critiques of the pieces because, as an art class, we can't just ignore the masterpieces when visiting a museum. Then, we were told to pick a spot in the exhibit and draw the space. We weren't supposed to hone in on any artwork, just get the dimensions and perspectives of the complex interior design.

It was frustrating trying to capture the relationship between angles and objects and such, but I found that when I slowed down and really observed my surroundings, it became a lot easier to create a realistic drawing. By the end, I was really happy with what I had created.

Our walking-distance field trip to the museum proved a unique way to improve our work and technique. During the following class,  when we were back in the studio, we were given another still life to draw. Again, we were told to pay careful attention to the space around the still life. There was a clear improvement after our museum intervention. We hung all of our drawings up for a critique and each pretty accurately reflected the still life, as well as the room behind the still life.

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Strolling along Bluff Point

- The Experience, Kirsten Forrester '17

A group of students from the Outdoors Club pose along a beach at Bluff Point, CT.

When I first think of Connecticut, I don’t think “outdoorsy.” Slowly, however, I am discovering all sorts of beautiful places around Conn. Bluff Point is one of them. Located a mere 15 minutes away, it’s a four-mile loop, a lot of which is along the ocean. I'm part of the Outdoors Club and I recently found this photo from one of our late fall hikes. The view was really quite stunning. The best part: I've met lots of new people from around campus. The mood of the day was bright and fun, and we had a perfect ending by heading to Two Wives pizza restaurant after for an Outdoors Club dinner. (They are located in downtown New London and their brick oven pizza is delicious.)

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Bread and soup for the soul

- The Experience, Rebecca Seidemann '18

Here at Conn, Tuesdays and Thursdays are associated with one of our College's beloved traditions: "Soup and Bread Day." Taking place in Freeman Dining Hall, one of our smaller, more homey dining halls, Soup and Bread Day offers a variety of soups and fresh baked loaves of bread, in addition to the usual options. This means a stomach full of buttery, creamy goodness. Everyone develops their own soup and bread preferences. I, for one, think that the circular loaves with a thick crust are without competition. A slice of that with a bowl of butternut squash soup is magical. Others, however, disagree. Some of my friends, for example, prefer the whole grain breads, which I find ridiculous.

I've been going to Soup and Bread Day since nearly the first week of school. It's always nice to be able to take a break from Harris, the main dining hall, and be able to traverse campus a bit. My friend Anne and I generally head there after Latin class and, without a doubt, there are always crowds. Students from every corner of campus seem to flock to Freeman twice a week. There are a lot of regulars, like myself, as well as newcomers. It's always interesting to compare how many familiar faces there are versus how many new faces there are.

After a few visits, you'll find that more and more faces become familiar. Given the popularity of Soup and Bread Day and the intimacy of the dining hall, people often find themselves merging tables with strangers. It offers a great opportunity to make friends, or at least have interesting conversations with new people over a meal. Personally, I've met a couple of very close friends over soup and bread.

Now that it's getting colder, I can only imagine how satisfying warm soup will be in the winter. 

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