English



Professors:  Boyd, Gezari, Gordon, Hartman, Rivkin; Associate Professor:  Ray; Assistant Professors:  Ammirati, Baker, Ferhatovic, Neely, Shoemaker, Strabone; Visiting Assistant Professor:  Jackson; Associate Professor Wilder, chair

The department gives students the opportunity to study the literature produced in Great Britain, the United States, and the rest of the world where English is spoken and written.  Students may select from a wide range of courses that focus on major writers and genres, considering the relationship of literary works to their historical and geographical contexts, and connect the study of English literatures to other disciplines.  Our courses emphasize the pleasures of the imagination and seek to develop habits of critical thinking, rigorous analysis, and cogent writing.

The department offers concentrations in both creative writing (poetry or fiction) and the comparative study of race and ethnicity, in connection with the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity.

The Major in English

The major consists of 150 (formerly 202), 250 (formerly 220), and at least eight other courses.  These must include at least five at the 300 level or above which satisfy three geographical areas (British, U.S., and World literatures) and three historical periods (Medieval/Renaissance literature, Renaissance/Eighteenth Century/Romantic literature, and literature from 1800 to the present).  The same course may satisfy both an area and a period requirement, but no single course can satisfy two area or two period requirements.

British literature:  303, 305, 309, 310, 312, 320, 324, 326, 327, 329, 330, 331, 333, 365, 493G, 494G, 493U, 494U, 493Y, 494Y

U.S. literature:  301, 305, 306, 307, 326, 332, 337, 341, 343, 360, 493B, 494B, 493C, 494C, 493H, 494H, 493Q, 494Q

World literature:  311, 314, 335, 359, 360, 362, 493Q, 494Q

Medieval/Renaissance literature:  303, 324, 330, 331, 333, 493Y, 494Y

Renaissance/Eighteenth Century/Romantic literature:  303, 309, 310, 312, 324, 327, 329, 331, 343, 493Y, 494Y

Literature from 1800 to the present:  301, 304, 305, 306, 307, 310, 314, 320, 326, 327, 332, 335, 337, 341, 343, 359, 360, 362, 363, 365, 493B, 494B, 493C, 494C, 493H, 494H, 493Q, 494Q, 493U, 494U

All majors are required to complete a senior seminar (493 or 494) unless they are writing a critical honors thesis. Both the senior seminar and honors study may be used to meet the area and period  requirements of the major.  Only one course at the 100 level may be counted towards the minimum of ten.  One course in a foreign-language literature may be counted towards the minimum of ten; such a course cannot satisfy an area or period requirement.

Only two courses in writing (217, 221, 240, 300, 321, 322, 340) may be counted towards the minimum of ten, although all writing courses are counted in determining the maximum of 16 courses allowed in one department.

Two courses taken outside the College may, with permission of the chair, be counted towards the major.

Concentration in Creative Writing

Students are expected to concentrate in either fiction or poetry writing.

               For the concentration in fiction writing, students must complete the ten courses for the major, including 217 and either 321 or 322.  Students elect two additional courses in fiction writing:  221, 291, 292, 321, 322, 391, 392, 491, 492, or 497-498.  A course in poetry writing may be substituted for a course in fiction writing.

               For the concentration in poetry writing, students must complete the ten courses for the major, including 240 and 340.  Students elect two additional courses in poetry writing: 291, 292, 391, 392, 491, 492, or 497-498.  A course in fiction writing may be substituted for a course in poetry writing.

Advisers:  B. Boyd, C. Hartman

Concentration in Race and Ethnicity

Students must complete the major as described above, with the addition of Comparative Race and Ethnicity 206 and the two-credit fellowship course Comparative Race and Ethnicity 394. Of the ten English courses required of the major, one must be English 242 and three must be from the department's list of 300- and 400-level courses that satisfy the concentration in race and ethnicity (English 303B, 311, 329, 337, 359, 360, 374, 493H, 494H), including one in the pre-1830 period. Students must also complete a seminar writing requirement with a paper on race and ethnicity for a course or individual study at the 400 level. 

The Minor in English

The minor consists of English 150 (formerly 202); English 250 (formerly 220); and three courses at the intermediate or advanced levels, two of them at the 300 or 400 level, including one English department course in literature before 1830.  One course in writing at the intermediate level or above may be counted toward the minor.

Learning Goals in the English Major

Students who graduate with the major in English must gain a broad knowledge of literatures written in English; establish sophisticated habits of engagement with texts of all kinds; become familiar with a range of methods of literary analysis; acquire rhetorical and logical skills in both written and oral argument; and develop a flexible framework for organizing knowledge about literary texts and their value as human achievements and reflections of the human condition.

               Literature is the most intense, experimental and human use of language.  Our students come to understand the vitality of language in its various contexts and learn to use it both consciously and imaginatively, whether as argument or art or both.  What constitutes good writing may be debated, but we all know it when we read it, and majors in English must consistently strive to achieve it.  All of our courses emphasize the art of writing and the benefits of close reading.  Through this process our students develop articulateness, cultural literacy and intellectual agility.

               The major in English requires a minimum of ten courses.  English 150 (formerly 202), the first required course for the major, focuses on the acquisition of skills in close reading and illuminates fundamental questions about literature:  how texts have voices and tell stories; how formal elements shape meaning; and how historical and cultural contexts affect both textual production and reception.  In English 250 (formerly 220), the second required course, students become familiar with different methodologies for approaching literature and explore the intersections of literature with other disciplines and interdisciplinary fields.  Here students hone essential research skills and develop techniques for writing within the discipline.  After completing English 150 (formerly 202) and 250 (formerly 220), majors must take five courses at the 300 and 400 levels which explore different historical periods (medieval, Victorian, postmodern, etc.) and regions of the English-speaking world (Britain, North America, Africa, etc).

The culmination of the major is either an Honors thesis developed during two semesters of intensive work with a faculty director, or a one-semester capstone Senior Seminar.  To write either the long essay for this seminar or the Honors thesis, students must engage in intensive individual research and detailed textual analysis, and they must produce a written argument that is complex, sustained, supported and persuasive.

Students may choose to do additional coursework to complete the Concentration in Creative Writing (Fiction or Poetry) or the Concentration in Race and Ethnicity.  Students who are admitted to the Concentration in Creative Writing may then be admitted to Honors study.  An Honors thesis in Fiction or Poetry supplements but does not replace the Senior Seminar.

Courses

ENGLISH  110  INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE AND MIND  This is the same course as Linguistics/German Studies/Hispanic Studies 110.  Refer to the Linguistics listing for a course description.

ENGLISH  119  LITERATURE AND THE EVOLUTION OF MIND  An examination of the human drive to tell stories.  We will explore the evolving relationship between storytelling and the mind through close reading of literary texts, with help from philosophy and cognitive science.  Readings include The Odyssey and Hamlet, as well as works by Dickinson, Poe, Woolf, Joyce, and Morrison.

               Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  S. Shoemaker

ENGLISH  123  INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE  This course focuses on major movements in African-American literary history, from the antebellum era to the present.  Students will be introduced to the practice of literary analysis through a study of early and recent criticism.  Discussions will focus on the tricky question of how to identify a uniquely African-American text.

               Open to freshmen and sophomores.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  C. Baker

ENGLISH  124  FROM TREASURE ISLAND TO HOGWARTS:  AMERICAN AND BRITISH FANTASY 1883-1997  A study of the development of fantasy in Britain and America from Robert Louis Stevenson to J. K. Rowling.  Emphasis on the sub-genres of fantasy such as Christian fantasy (Lewis, Tolkien) and dark fantasy (Bradbury).

               A statement of interest must be submitted to the instructor two weeks prior to pre-registration and will constitute the basis for selection of 40 students.  Admission by permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  P. Ray

ENGLISH  125 CHAUCER, SHAKESPEARE, MILTON, AND COMPANY A historical survey of English literature's most enduring writings up to the early nineteenth century, ranging from Geoffrey Chaucer′s Canterbury Tales to Jonathan Swift′s Gulliver′s Travels.  Other writers to be considered include Shakespeare, Marlowe, Donne, Spenser, Milton, and Pope.  Students may not receive credit for this course and the Freshman Seminar ″Golden Oldies.″

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  J. Gordon

ENGLISH  126  THE TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAN SHORT STORY  This course traces the development of the 20th-century American short story via rigorous close-readings of texts, while paying careful attention to literary, historical, and market-based contexts.  Authors include Anderson, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Welty, Salinger, O'Connor, Malamud, Baldwin, Barth, Oates, Carver, Beattie, O'Brien, Moore, Diaz, and Lahiri.

               Open to freshmen and sophomores.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  Staff

ENGLISH  127  SONGS  How words act in the context of music.  Concentrating on the past century of American lyrics, we ask how a song, through rhyme, the fit between words and notes, and larger structures, makes us want to hear and sing it.  Dylan, Billie Holiday, Cohen, Mitchell, Sufian Stevens, and other folk, blues, jazz, and popular songwriters.  This is the same course as American Studies 127.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  C. Hartman

ENGLISH  137  FICTIONS OF EMPIRE:  POWER AND PERSONHOOD IN POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE  An analysis of relationship between history and individuality in texts from three broad categories:  imperial narratives, narratives of decolonization, and postcolonial narratives.  Readings from authors such as Kipling, Haggard, Forster, Achebe, Naipaul, Dangarembga, and Friel.

               Open to freshman and sophomores.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  J-M. Jackson

ENGLISH  150  ESSENTIALS OF LITERARY STUDY  An introduction to the skills and concepts fundamental to the discipline of English and the art of reading and writing.  Discussions emphasize the close reading of poetry and prose fiction, and the historical, cultural, and linguistic contexts of literary texts.  This is the first course required for the major and minor.

               Open to freshmen and sophomores, unless otherwise stated in the course schedule.  Enrollment limited to 16 students in each section.  Offered both semesters.  Students may not receive credit for both this course and English 202.  This is a designated Writing course.  Staff

ENGLISH  155  AMERICAN EARTH:  PURITANS TO THE PRESENT  An examination of contemporary ecological crises and their cultural origins.  The course considers how concepts such as nature, wilderness, and sustainability have been imagined in American literature from the colonial period to the present.  Genres range from nonfiction to science fiction.  Authors may include Thoreau, London, Abbey, and Butler.  This is the same course as Environmental Studies 155.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  M. Neely

ENGLISH  204  NOMADS, SHAMANS, AND MYSTICS:  IMAGINING CENTRAL ASIA  A sampling of literature and cinema from the area between Russia, Iran, India, and China, from the earliest written epics to the present time.  The course traces divergences and convergences in artworks by nomads, shamans, Sufi mystics, Mughal emperors and painters, Soviet satirists and science-fiction writers, and contemporary Afghan novelists and film-makers.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen who have taken English 150 (formerly 202).  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  D. Ferhatovic

ENGLISH  207  INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN LITERATURE:  THE 19TH CENTURY  A survey of 19th century American literature, considering such issues as the rise of professionalization of authorship in America, abolition and race, women′s rights, self-reliance, and the transition from romance to realism.  Authors may include Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Douglass, Dickinson, and James.  This is the same course as American Studies 207.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen who have taken English 150 (formerly 202). Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  Staff

ENGLISH  208  INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN LITERATURE:  THE 20TH CENTURY AND THE PRESENT  A survey of American literature from modernism to postmodernism.  Particular attention to revolts against tradition, challenges to stable concepts of literary value, and intersections with the other arts.  Authors may include Hurston, Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Steinbeck, Eliot, Stevens, Bishop, Morrison, and DeLillo.  This is the same course as American Studies 208.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen who have taken English 150 (formerly 202). Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  C. Baker

ENGLISH  212  ICELANDIC SAGAS  An induction into the understated, psychologically complex, and adventure-filled world of the Icelandic sagas.  We will read in translation about Icelanders’ explorations from North America to Constantinople and their long-standing feuds at home, about their marriages, lawsuits, and even encounters with trolls.  Some discussion of elementary Old Norse/Icelandic and the runes.

               Prerequisite:  Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen who have taken English 150 (formerly 202).  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  D. Ferhatovic

ENGLISH  213  BOB DYLAN  This course explores Dylan's work as a verbal artist from Bob Dylan (1962) through Tempest (2012), with attention to musical accompaniment and its interaction with lyrics; cultural and artistic background; revisions and covers; transcription, performance, and the reception and distribution of song.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen who have taken English 150 (formerly 202).  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  J. Gezari and C. Hartman

ENGLISH  217  WRITING THE SHORT STORY  Students will study and write short fiction.

               Prerequisite:  Writing samples must be submitted to the instructor one week prior to preregistration and will constitute the basis for selection of 12 students.  Admission by permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 5 and is a designated Writing course.  B. Boyd

ENGLISH  221  NARRATIVE NON-FICTION  Intensive writing course emphasizing use of narrative techniques in nonfiction writing.  Relationship of fiction and nonfiction, integration of storytelling with essay-writing and reporting.  Focus on the development of individual style.  Readings may include Didion, Mailer, Thompson, and James Baldwin.

               Admission by permission of instructor.  Enrollment limited to 15 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 5 and is a designated Writing course.  B. Boyd

ENGLISH  228  WRITING WITH A PURPOSE:  THE ADVANCED ESSAY  An intensive course in exposition designed to help the competent writer become an accomplished one.  Emphasis on style and the development of the writer′s characteristic voice.

               Admission by permission of the instructor.  Samples of student writing must be submitted prior to registration.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This is designated a writing course.  J. Gordon

ENGLISH  233  RUNES, RIDDLES, AND DRAGONS:  ADVENTURES IN OLD ENGLISH  An introduction to the earliest form of English and its rich literature.  Students will learn elementary Old English (or Anglo-Saxon, 450-1100) and explore diverse texts from the period in translation, including Beowulf, riddles, elegies, charms, runic inscriptions, history and chronicle, along with literature, film, and comics they have inspired.  This is the same course as Linguistics 233.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7 and is a designated Writing course.  D. Ferhatovic

ENGLISH  235  WRITING AFRICA NOW  A survey of post-2000 literary and cultural production from sub-Saharan Africa.  Topics include debates over fiction's relevance to African experience, legacies of canonical writing about independence, Africa as "tragic" landscape, and problems of scale and context.  The course examines works by authors such as Adichie, Wainaina, Duiker, and Vladislavic, as well as film and hip-hop.

               Prerequisite:  Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen who have taken English 150 (formerly 202).  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  J-M. Jackson

ENGLISH  236  THE NOVEL AND APARTHEID  A study of novels produced under and about Apartheid in South Africa.  Topics will include the relations between apartheid and South African literature, and the idea of an indigenous novel tradition.  Authors include Gordimer, Brink, Tlali, Coetzee, Mda, and others.

               Prerequisite:  Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen who have taken English 150 (formerly 202).  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  J-M. Jackson

ENGLISH  240  READING AND WRITING POEMS  Introduction to the writing of poetry through reading, analysis, imitation, and composition.

               Enrollment limited to 18 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 5 and is a designated Writing course.  C. Hartman

ENGLISH  241  CONTEMPORARY FICTION WITHOUT BORDERS  How does literature in the U.S. and outside it confront the animating social and political anxieties of our time?  We will read the work of celebrated living writers such as Philip Roth, Jonathan Lethem, Toni Morrison, Don DeLillo, Akhil Sharma, Alice Munro, J.M. Coetzee, Peter Carey, Amitav Ghosh, Martin Amis, Orhan Pamuk, and Zadie Smith.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen who have taken English 150 (formerly 202). Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  J. Gezari

ENGLISH  242  LITERATURE AND RACE CRITICISM  An exploration of the construction of race in literary and cultural discourse.  The course pays special attention to how race as a general category intersects with other forms of identity such as gender and class.  Readings will range from modernist novels to modern hip-hop.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen who have taken English 150 (formerly 202). Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  J-M. Jackson

ENGLISH  250  THEORY AND PRACTICE OF LITERARY STUDY  An introduction to practical and theoretical questions about the discipline of English and the study of literatures in English.  What is distinctive about English as a discipline and how does it intersect with other disciplines and interdisciplinary fields?  While continuing to refine the techniques of close reading developed in English 150 (formerly 202), we will consider how some theories of language, text, value, narrative, author, audience, history, culture, psyche, identity, and politics may shape literary study.

               Prerequisite:  English 150 (formerly 202).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  Offered both semesters.  Students may not receive credit for both this course and English 220.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4 and is a designated Writing course.  Staff

ENGLISH  253  NO HOMELAND IS FREE:  CHINESE AMERICAN LITERATURE  This is the same course as American Studies/Comparative Race and Ethnicity/East Asian Studies 253.  Refer to the East Asian Studies listing for a course description.

ENGLISH  264  HAPPY ENDINGS:  SHAKESPEARE'S COMEDIES  The ″happy ending″ of Shakespeare's comedies—marriage—is costly.  Articulate women grow silent; cross-dressed boys resume their gowns (or don't); elaborate plots are disrupted by rape and venereal disease.  Whence this anxiety?  Where does Shakespeare find hope or consolation?  Readings include A Midsummer Night's Dream, Twelfth Night, All's Well That Ends Well, and The Winter's Tale.  This is the same course as Gender and Women's Studies/Theater 264.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors;  and to freshman who have taken English 150 (formerly 202).  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  L. Wilder

ENGLISH  265  SPEAKING WHAT WE FEEL:  SHAKESPEARE'S TRAGEDIES AND HISTORIES  Shakespeare's tragedies and histories break conventions and leave raw ends.  Amid crumbling social structures such as divinely sanctioned kingship, primogeniture, and hierarchical marriage, Shakespeare finds theatrical and poetic opportunity.  Readings include Titus Andronicus, Richard III, Romeo and Juliet, Henry IV Part 1, Henry V, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra.  This is the same course as Gender and Women's Studies/Theater 265.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshman who have taken English 150 (formerly 202).  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  L. Wilder

ENGLISH  299  ARCHIVE FEVER  This is the same course as Sophomore Research Seminar 299F.  Refer to the Sophomore Research Seminar listing for a course description.

ENGLISH  300  SEMINAR IN THE TEACHING OF WRITING  This course will explore theories of writing, current research on writing as a process, and the theory and ethics of peer tutoring and evaluation.  Extensive reading of texts on the composition process and rhetorical theory.  The course is specifically designed to provide training for Writing Center tutors, but will be useful to any student interested in exploring the teaching of writing.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors with permission of the instructor.  Students must submit two writing samples for evaluation.  This course does not count toward the English minor.  Enrollment limited to 17 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  S. Shoemaker

ENGLISH  301  AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS  A study of major works by four or five American women writers.  Authors may include Bradstreet, Dickinson, Wharton, Cather, Petry, Bishop, O'Connor, Morrison, and Danticat.  This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 301.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Students may not receive credit for this course and 301C.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  J. Rivkin, Staff

ENGLISH  303  HISTORY AND TEXT IN RENAISSANCE DRAMA  A historicist, materialist perspective on Renaissance drama.  Readings in these courses include the plays by Shakespeare and others, historical documents on Early English Books Online, and literary criticism and theory.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  L. Wilder

ENGLISH  303A PAIN AND VIOLENCE IN RENAISSANCE DRAMA  Violence and physical pain receive special emphasis on the Renaissance stage.  Readings may include Marlowe′s Tamburlaine, Webster′s The Duchess of Malfi, Shakespeare′s King Lear and Titus Andronicus, Ford′s ′Tis Pity She′s a Whore, and contemporary accounts of theatrical performance.  L. Wilder

ENGLISH  303B  RELIGION AND OTHERNESS IN RENAISSANCE DRAMA  An examination of how dramatists have engaged, explored, and unsettled religious beliefs by presenting imagined "others" such as Jews, Muslims, and Moors, as well as supernatural beings like devils, witches, and ghosts to their audiences.  Readings, which include Doctor Faustus, The Jew of Malta, Hamlet, Othello, and The Tempest, are considered in the context of contemporary religious discourses.  L. Wilder

ENGLISH  305  MODERN POETRY  The development of a modern idiom in poetry.  A study of poets including Yeats, Eliot, Pound, W.C. Williams, Auden, and Wallace Stevens.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  J. Gordon

ENGLISH  306  CONTEMPORARY POETRY  A close study of poetry written between 1940 and the present.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  Staff

ENGLISH  306A  POETRY OF THE POST-MODERN ERA  A chronological review of the major English-language poets since World War II.  Poets studied will include Thomas, Plath, Berryman, Lowell, Heany, Rich, Bishop, and Ashbery.  J. Gordon

ENGLISH  306B  RECENT AMERICAN POETS  An exploration of the careers of five or six of our contemporaries and near-contemporaries.  This may begin with work like that of Roethke (d. 1963), Bishop (d. 1979), Hayden (d. 1983), or Matthews (d. 1997), but will also include poets still active among us, such as Kinnell, Glück, Levine, Dove, Ashbery, Doty, etc.  C. Hartman

ENGLISH  307  LITERATURE AND FILM OF THE 1930s  An examination of prose, poetry, and film from a period marked by dramatic modernization, severe economic depression, and the rise of fascism in Europe.  Authors include Fitzgerald, Steinbeck, West, Chandler, Larsen, Hurston, Williams, and Rukeyser.  Films include King Kong, Modern Times, Scarface, White Zombie, Triumph of the Will, and The Big Sleep.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen who have taken English 150 (formerly 202).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  S. Shoemaker

ENGLISH  309  ROMANTICISM I  A study of poetry and prose in the British Isles, 1760-1810, this course will examine theories, definitions, and origins of romanticism.  Topics will include slavery, women′s rights, Britishness, and the French Revolution in the writings of Macpherson, Gray, Percy, Burns, Equiano, Radcliffe, Lewis, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, Barbauld, and More.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  J. Strabone

ENGLISH  310  ROMANTICISM II  A study of poetry, prose, and painting in the British Isles, 1810-1850, this course will examine the legacy of romanticism in the 19th century.  Authors and artists include Byron, Keats, Shelley, Edgeworth, Scott, Austen, Hogg, Constable, Palmer, and Turner.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  J. Strabone

ENGLISH  311  AFRICAN NOVELS  This study of the novel across Africa since the 1950s will analyze the historical and theoretical contexts for the emergence of modern African literature.  Authors may include Achebe, Armah, Bâ, Ben Jelloun, Coetzee, Emecheta, Mahfouz, Ngugi, Okri, Sembene, and Tutuola.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  J. Strabone

ENGLISH  312  MILTON  Ambitious poet, revolutionary propagandist, free-press advocate, and would-be divorcé, Milton spent his later years blind and crying out to be ″milked″ by his secretaries of his great poem, Paradise Lost.  Readings will include Comus, Lycidas, Areopagitica, Paradise Lost, excerpts from Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  L. Wilder

ENGLISH  314  THE NOVEL AND GLOBALIZATION  A course exploring how some contemporary novels try to cognitively map the increasingly global world, in ways that seemed to become impossible after the nineteenth century.  Authors we will read include Zadie Smith, China Miéville, William Gibson, Robert Newman, and Alan Moore.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  Staff

ENGLISH  320  SPECIAL TOPICS IN 20th CENTURY FICTION  This is a designated Writing course.

ENGLISH  320A  JAMES JOYCE  A study of the works of James Joyce with special emphasis on Ulysses.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  Offered alternately with English 320B.  J. Gordon

ENGLISH  320B  MODERNISM AND ITS DISCONTENTS  A comparison of representative works of 20th-century "modernist" fiction with more traditional works from the same period.  Authors to be studied may include Joyce, Ford, Woolf, Wodehouse, Waugh, and Nabokov.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  Offered alternately with English 320A.  J. Gordon

ENGLISH  321, 322  SEMINAR IN FICTION  The study and writing of fiction.  Emphasis will be on the short story, although qualified students may write portions of novels.

               Prerequisite:  English 217 and permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  B. Boyd

ENGLISH  323 THE DIARY:  CRAFTING PRIVATE LIVES, HIDING PUBLIC SELVES  This is the same course as Gender and Women's Studies 323.  Refer to the Gender and Women's Studies listing for a course description.

ENGLISH  324  DONNE, HERBERT, MARVELL  These poets played vastly different roles in public (Donne and Herbert as clergymen, Marvell as an MP) than in their private verse, and two of them published none of it during their lifetimes.  We will examine this privacy in the context of religious and political upheavals of seventeenth-century England.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  L. Wilder

ENGLISH  325  OCCUPY AMERICAN LITERATURE  An examination of issues such as inequality, spirituality, consumerism, and happiness, which loom large in contemporary public discourse but which are hardly new.  The course considers how materialism and ″the good life″ were represented in American literature from 1630 to 1900.  Authors include Bradstreet, Franklin, Hawthorne, and Alger.
               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  M. Neely

ENGLISH  326  THRILLS, CHILLS, AND TEARS:  BLACK GENRE FICTION  A study of works by authors of African descent that fall into popular genres such as science fiction, romance novels, detective fiction, teen lit, and graphic novels.  We will discuss literary attributes, genre conventions, and book culture.  Authors may include Walter Mosely, Octavia Butler, bell hooks, Samuel Delany, and Nikki Grimes.  This is the same course as Comparative Race and Ethnicity/Gender and Women's Studies 326.

               Prerequisite:  Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  C. Baker

ENGLISH 327  THE RISE OF THE NOVEL  A survey of the British novel from the early 18th century to the mid-19th century.  Attention to how the novel registers the problems raised by urban and print culture, increasing social instability, and the changing status of women.  Authors may include Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Burney, Austen, Thackeray, and Charlotte Brontë.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  J. Gezari

ENGLISH  329  RACE, NATION, AND EMPIRE IN THE EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY  A study of the concepts of race, nation, and empire focusing on modern theoretical texts and eighteenth-century literature and history.  We will investigate the power of these concepts and the role that literature and culture may play in their construction.  Texts include novels, poetry, laws, and other historical documents.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  J. Strabone

ENGLISH  330  SPECIAL TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE  This is a designated Writing course.

ENGLISH  330A  VISUAL AND LITERARY WORLDS OF MEDIEVAL ENGLAND  An extended look into medieval England (and, by necessity, France) as a multicultural and multimedia space.  We will study various texts from the period, including Beowulf, The Lais, two Canterbury Tales, and Pearl, in conjunction with more visual artworks such as maps, manuscripts, tapestries, sculptures, and churches.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Students may not receive credit for this course and 330.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  D. Ferhatovic

ENGLISH  330B  LOVE AND SEX IN THE MIDDLE AGES  A study of diverse medieval erotic theories and practices, from rarified courtly amour to slapstick bourgeois lust, from epic bromance to priests-and-nuns-gone-wild, from doomed Arthurian adultery to physically and psychologically intense relationships with God.  Readings in modern English translation across genres, media, and cultures.  This is the same course as Gender and Women's Studies 330B.

               Prerequisite:  Open to junors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  D. Ferhatovic

ENGLISH  330C  MEDIEVAL TRAVELS, REAL AND FANTASTIC  A literary exploration of journeys written about and originating in medieval Europe and the Mediterranean.  Who travels and where, and whom do they meet?  Readings will cover fabulous beasts and monsters, visions of heaven, trips to the underworld, military expeditions (the Crusades and the response), mystical and romantic quests.

               Prerequisite:  English 150 and 250.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  D. Ferhatovic

ENGLISH  331 SHAKESPEARE IN PERFORMANCE  Through live performances of Shakespeare′s plays and engaging in the discipline of performance studies, we will discuss the overlap between ritual, performance, and various forms of adaptation (operatic, postcolonial, parodic).  Plays will be selected from those being performed in the New London area.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  L. Wilder

ENGLISH  332  EXQUISITE CORPSES  A study of how dead bodies affect narrative.  Of particular concern is how race and gender influence the occurrence and reading of death.  The course questions the "expendability" of certain groups and systemic death as narrative premise.  Films and books include Sunset Boulevard, Suddenly Last Summer, Jazz, and In Cold Blood.  This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 332.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  C. Baker

ENGLISH  333  THE CANTERBURY TALES  A careful reading of a large selection of Chaucer′s most famous work, in Middle English.  Paying attention to its poetics as well as historical contexts, theoretical approaches, and modern appropriations, we will discuss such issues as gender, love, money, profanity, rank, religion, otherness, and violence in relation to the tales.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  D. Ferhatovic

ENGLISH  335  TWICE-TOLD TALES  This course pairs classic English novels with contemporary novels or films that re-write them.  Attention to how contemporary works interrogate, appropriate, and revise their precursor texts.  Pairings have included Robinson Crusoe and Foe, Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea, Heart of Darkness and Apocalypse Now, Mrs. Dalloway and The Hours.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  J. Gezari

ENGLISH  336  HUMANS AND OTHER ANIMALS IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE  The intersections of nature, culture, and species across primarily nineteenth-century literature.  The course explores questions of gender, race, and category in fiction and poetry in order to examine the aesthetic, scientific, and cultural-historical dimensions of how humans, animals, and their environments are represented.  This is the same course as Environmental Studies 336.

               Prerequisite:  Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  M. Neely

ENGLISH  337  THE LITERATURE OF PASSING  Explorations of various forms of "passing"--black as white, Jew as gentile, woman as man, gay as straight--in literature and film.  Issues include the notion of a visible or marked "identity," motives for passing, comparisons between different forms of passing, and meanings of "coming out."  Literary works to be studied may include Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, Chestnutt's The Wife of His Youth and Other Stories of the Color Line, Larsen's Passing, Cather's My Antonia, Leavitt's The Lost Language of Cranes, and Gates's "White Like Me."  Films may include The Crying Game, Paris Is Burning, and Europa, Europa.  Secondary readings in feminist, gay and lesbian/queer, and critical race theory.  This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 337.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  J. Rivkin

ENGLISH  340  WRITING OF POETRY:  INTERMEDIATE  Workshop in the writing of poetry through weekly reading and writing assignments.  Emphasis on class discussion of class poems.

               Prerequisite:  English 240 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  C. Hartman

ENGLISH  348  CHARLES DICKENS  A study of the full range of Dicken's works.  Novels read will include Oliver Twist, Dombey and Son, David Copperfield, Great Expectations, Bleak House, and Our Mutual Friend.

               Prerequisite:  Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken course 250 (formerly 220).  Students may not receive credit for this course and English 493U, 494U.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  J. Gordon

ENGLISH  355  BLACK WOMEN IN PRINT AND ON SCREEN  A study of cinematic and literary works featuring and/or created by African-American women, this course discusses the problems and possibilities entailed in representing black women in art.  Topics include feminism, womanism, sexuality, class, and regionalism.  Readings/screenings may include the films Bush Mama and Pariah  and the novels Push and Passing.  This is the same course as American Studies 335/Comparative Race and Ethnicity 336/Film Studies 335/Gender and Women's Studies 335. 

               Prerequisite:  Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  C. Baker

ENGLISH  356  RADICAL DIETS:  FOOD AND DRINK IN AMERICAN LITERATURE  An exploration of topics such as hunger, temperance, culinary nationalism, and the aesthetic challenges of representing the pleasures of eating and drinking in literature.  Authors may include Mary Rowlandson, Melville, Dickinson, Hughes, Hemingway, and Suzanne Collins.

               Prerequisite:  Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  M. Neely

ENGLISH  359  LAW AND JUSTICE IN POSTCOLONIAL NARRATIVE  An exploration of the relation between law and justice in Anglophone narrative.  Is justice a process or an outcome?  Is it local or transnational?  How does fiction complicate our understanding of legal processes?  Primary readings by Ngugi (Kenya), MacInnes (England), Krog (South Africa), Farah (Somalia), and Grace (New Zealand), with secondary readings in philosophy and legal theory.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  J-M. Jackson

ENGLISH  360  RACE AND DOCUMENTARY FILM  This course looks at how documentary films representing race function as anthropological, imperialist, propagandist, and popular texts.  Attention will be paid to questions of commodification and (self-)representation and to the responsibilities of filmmakers and spectators of film.  Films may include Chronicle of a Summer, Through Navajo Eyes, and When the Levees Broke.  This is the same course as Film Studies 360.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  C. Baker

ENGLISH  362  ALICE MUNRO AND THE SHORT STORY  Canadian writer Alice Munro has been called "our Chekhov" and "the best living short story writer."  A study of Alice Munro, writers who have influenced her, and writers she has influenced.  Works by Cather, Agee, Lorrie Moore, Lara Vapynar, and much of Munro's fiction are included.  This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 362.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  J. Rivkin

ENGLISH  365  INTRODUCTION TO FINNEGANS WAKE  A study of the text and background of James Joyce's Finnegans Wake.  Concentration on selected passages.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  J. Gordon

ENGLISH  367  NOVEL COMMODITIES  An exploration of contemporary literature about "things," with a focus on India and the United States.  How does literature represent our relations to things – as producers, consumers, collectors, discarders, recyclers?  How do things and people circulate in a globalized economy, and what would be an ethical ecology of things?  Authors may include Arundhati Roy, Amitav Ghosh, Kiran Desai, and Katherine Boo.  This is the same course as Environment Studies 367.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  J. Rivkin

ENGLISH 374  THE ARAB SPRING  This the same course as Arabic 374.  Refer to the Arabic Studies listing for a course description.

ENGLISH  375  TOLSTOY AND DOSTOEVSKY  This is the same course as Slavic Studies 375.  Refer to the Slavic Studies listing for a course description.

ENGLISH  493, 494  SENIOR SEMINARS

               Open to seniors and juniors.  Enrollment in each seminar limited to 16 students.  This is a designated Writing course.

ENGLISH  493C, 494C  HEMINGWAY AND FITZGERALD  A study of the works of Hemingway and Fitzgerald, examining novels, short fiction, correspondence, and memoir in order to investigate how these two authors responded to their times and to each other.  Topics include artistic collaboration and competition, codes of masculinity, literary exile, war, and capitalism.  S. Shoemaker

ENGLISH  493G, 494G  JANE AUSTEN  This study of all of Jane Austen's work, finished and unfinished, will cover her life and times, her literary interlocutors, and the major criticism on Austen over the past two centuries.  This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 413.  J. Strabone

ENGLISH  493H, 494H  TONI MORRISON  A close reading of work by one of America's greatest writers.  Novels (Beloved, Paradise, Song of Solomon), selections of Morrison's critical writing (e.g., Playing in the Dark:  Whiteness and the Literary Imagination) and other texts (e.g., her libretto for the opera Margaret Garner) are included.  This is the same course as Gender and Women's Studies 418.  C. Baker

ENGLISH  493J, 494J  GORDIMER AND COETZEE:  THE NOVEL AND HISTORY  A comparative study of major works by Nadine Gordimer and J.M. Coetzee, with emphasis on their early and middle periods.  Special attention to critical essays by each writer about the other, as well as issues of shared historical and literary concern.  Topics include the role of the public intellectual in Apartheid-era South Africa and the relationship between politics and form.

               Prerequisite:  Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken English 250 (formerly 220).  J-M. Jackson

ENGLISH  493L, 494L  HENRY JAMES AND EDITH WHARTON  An exploration of selected novels by America's greatest Gilded Age realists.  The course considers the development of the international novel and the shift from the novel of manners to the interiorized novel of consciousness.  Readings may include The Portrait of a Lady, What Maisie Knew, The Wings of the Dove, The House of Mirth, and The Age of Innocence.  J. Rivkin

ENGLISH  493M, 494M ARTHURIAN LEGEND  Arthur, Guinevere, Lancelot, Merlin, Morgan, and others in the action-filled, magical narratives that introduced them.  Readings of Arthurian texts from Britain and the Continent with an emphasis on psychoanalytic, New Historicist, and postcolonial approaches.  Some attention to Victorian and contemporary adaptations and versions.

               Prerequisite:  Open to seniors, and open to juniors with permission of the instructor.  D. Ferhatovic

ENGLISH  493Q, 494Q  VLADIMIR NABOKOV  Mandarin, Magician, Écrivain.  This course explores his most enduring themes:  memory, time, language, pity, and pleasure.  Emphasis on the novels he wrote in English during his great middle period:  The Real Life of Sebastian Knight, Lolita, Pnin, and Pale Fire.  Some attention to short stories; Russian novels; Speak, Memory; and late style.  This is the same course as Slavic Studies 446.  J. Gezari

ENGLISH  493Y, 494Y  SHAKESPEAR'S BRAIN, SHEKESPEAER'S BODY  This seminar examines the staging of the ″material mind″ and the body in the Renaissance theater.  Readings may include Hamlet, Macbeth, Marlowe′s Dr. Faustus, Jonson′s Every Man in his Humour, and Marston′s The Malcontent, as well as materialist and new-historicist criticism and early modern physiology and anatomy.  L. Wilder

ENGLISH  291, 292  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

ENGLISH  391, 392  INDIVIDUAL STUDY 

ENGLISH  491, 492  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

ENGLISH  294  FIELD WORK  Supervised practical work in journalism or communications.  This course may be taken only by application and by permission of the department.  One credit hour, pass/not passed marking.

ENGLISH  497-498  HONORS STUDY  Candidates for Honors in English are required to take English 497-498 in the senior year and expected to take English 304 in the spring semester of the junior year.