Skip to main content

View posts from:  Most Recent  |  2016  |  2015  |  2014  |  2013

Recent Stories

The Experience, Mike Wipper '17

Mike Wipper

Hometown: Concord, Mass.
Major: Undeclared (likely anthropology)
Activities: MOBROC, Jazz Band and Cofee Grounds

Favorite aspect of Connecticut College:
The resources offered are incredible for students who seek them out. Professors are so enthusiastic to help students with projects, or have students help with their own research. Couple this with numerous interdisciplinary centers of study, grants available to help student research and a wealth of knowledge in the form of professors, library staff and peers with similar interests, and motivated students can really accomplish a lot in a relatively short period of time. The connections that students make with professors create an environment where professors and students are invested on the same level, all working toward greater knowledge.

Favorite location on campus:
The Arboretum is an incredible space that is often underutilized — get out there! It’s some of the most amazing forestry I’ve seen in the Northeast and I have yet to explore all of it. A great study or relaxation space.

Favorite memory at Connecticut College:
Playing numerous music shows around campus. There are some great spaces for entertainment around here!

Favorite activity in New London or the region:
The beaches! While Ocean Beach is fun for the classic “relaxing on the beach and boardwalk,” there are tons of other breathtaking areas in New London and the surrounding areas. Beautiful tide pools, salt marshes, wildlife and more. Bluff Point State Park is incredible, and everyone should visit at some point.

Casinos for Class?

Casinos for Class

We got to hit the casinos for class! Well, it’s not what you’re thinking — there was no gambling, drinking or seeing shows. As part of a trip for Professor Joyce Bennet's "Anthropology of Tourism" course, however, we did get to tour Mohegan Sun's various gaming rooms, paying particular attention to aspects of Native American culture and the way these details are utilized for aesthetic purposes. Mohegan Sun is located just fifteen minutes from campus. While I’d been to Mohegan Sun before to see Penn & Teller, getting to study the space with an academic lens was an entirely new and fascinating experience for me. The way the lights, sounds and “natural” looking decor lure gamers into a welcoming environment is incredible to study from a bystander perspective. Diligently taking notes and snapping photographs, I felt like a true anthropologist documenting the workings of a unique culture. I’ll always remember how much academic discovery can be found in a space I previously thought was just for fun and games.

Continue Reading

CISLA U.N. Trip

- The Experience, Kirsten Forrester '17  The Experience, Mike Wipper '17 

UN Trip CISLA

New London seems as if it might be in the middle of nowhere. It's easy to forget, however, that we’re actually quite close to major New England cities; we’re less than an hour to Providence, two hours to Boston and two and a half to New York City. All of these places make for great day trips, as well as cool opportunities for class field trips. Most recently, Mike and I headed to the United Nations with our CISLA class where we met with the delegations from France and Iran. 

The delegations are inconspicuously housed across the city. As we entered what appeared to be an ordinary office building, I found myself temporarily confused — where were we heading? Forty-two floors up, I found myself at the New York home of the Iranian delegation, a simplistic office with white walls featuring photos of Ayatollahs Ruhollah Khomeini and Ali Kahmenei, the Supreme Leaders of Iran. Ushered into the library, a representative from the delegation gave us a brief introduction to Iran’s history and current foreign policy. The gist: Iran is not perfect, but they’re working on it. “We are the most stable country in the Middle East,” the delegate told us. Our course instructors encouraged us to respectfully ask difficult questions, and we found ourselves inquiring about the right to organize within Iran, the Houthi movement in Yemen and the implications of the nuclear deal with the United States. It was interesting to hear how his responses aligned with the official view of the Iranian government. It was a contrast to the French delegation, whose delegate met with us in the “parlor,” an ornate ballroom with tapestries, hardwood floors and a chandelier. He answered with his personal perspectives about social tensions, the Charlie Hebdo shooting and the potential use of secularism as a guise for the social exclusion of Islam.

Continue Reading

March discussions

Bergeron, Discussion, March, Monday

Recently, I found this photo of President Katherine Bergeron facing a crowd of students, staff, faculty and administrators sharing opinions and suggestions in March, while the campus engaged in dialogue about racism, equity and inclusion. I think this photo best captures the spirit we’re striving towards at Conn: groups coming together and discussing tough issues, reflecting respectful dialogue that can lead to great change. At what other school will the president join an informal meeting and hold such a candid discussion for hours on end?

Continue Reading

Bystanders Love Company

Bystanders Love Company

This year, Connsider, the group that produces TEDxConnecticut College, put on a number of events during the weeks leading up to the full conference. Partnering with GreenDot, “Bystanders Love Company," a play on this year's theme of “Genius Loves Company,” invited students to think about what it means to be a bystander and how we can shift these normally “passive” roles into active ones by changing the climates of sexual assault, violence, discrimination and hate speech. Here, my friends Jasmine Massa ’17, Alissa Siepka ’17 and Natalie Boles ’17 all create a list of goals and ways they can work to improve the social climate at Conn and beyond.

Continue Reading

Snow 2015

Snow

I did it. I found the last pile of snow on Conn’s campus. OK, so this photo is about a week old so as of today all the snow is melted. However, after months of bitter cold weather and the most snow days I think anyone at Conn can remember, it seems that there’s no snow to be seen in New London. In fact, it’s getting pretty warm around here. Now, it’s not unusual to see people lying around on the green, something nobody would have dared just a few weeks ago. Spring is here. R.I.P. the snow of winter 2015.

Continue Reading

So You Think You Know Me?

So You Think You Know Me?

The Think S.A.F.E. Program hosted its own version of "The Newlywed Game," pitting roommates, friends and couples against one another to see how well they really know each other.

While the overall message was fun, it also celebrated healthy relationships in all forms and continued Green Dot's efforts of sexual violence prevention. Green Dot is an organization that has become one of the most popular and beloved groups on campus. Built on the goal of fostering bystander action through education and the ever-popular training sessions, the organization has become a powerhouse in organizing events like Green Dot Week.

"So You Think You Know Me?" drew a huge crowd and I enjoyed playing as much as I enjoyed seeing other people's answers and responses. My favorite moment was when two roommates were asked, "What is your roommate's pet peeve?" Each correctly responded: people. It goes without saying that when they flipped the boards over and showed each other what they had written, laughter erupted.

Continue Reading

Love is for everyone

Often times, events on campus stand out by the amount of free food they offer. Although "Love is For Everyone" did offer the delicious cuisine of Mirch Masala, it was more than the food that drew me (and countless others) to enjoy a night of spoken word, group poetry and musical offerings, all aimed at transcending the idea of love on Valentine's Day just being about the romantic sense.

As a collaboration between the Office of Residential Education and Living, The Women's Center, the Residential Education Fellows, the Student Activities Council and other organizations, incredible poets from all class years came forward and offered their take on love in every sense of the word.

I must say: I've seen some spoken word performances and I'm not lying when I tell you that this night offered the best I had ever seen — much more so than some performances in Boston that were in "professional" settings. I was so amazed at the quality of art being created at our College. Pictured here are Haley Gowland '17 and Katherine McDonald '17 performing a number of beautiful duets: some sad, some happy, but all incredibly moving. Their harmonies sent shivers up my spine. Also pictured is Riley Meachem '18 performing an original poem. His creative language and beautiful rhetoric kept me entranced throughout the entire piece. In addition, I had a great conversation with Joseph Mercado, who organized the event with help from Professor Roberts of the Dance Department.

Continue Reading

The snow's a'meltin

Snooo

Outside my window stands a sculpture. Can't say I know the name and Google-ing around a little didn't help too much, but I see it every day when I leave for classes and come back to work. It sort of acts as one of those hokey "magical weather string" things that say stuff along the lines of, "If the string is wet, it's raining. If it's swaying, it's windy." Well, a few days ago, I looked out and the sculpture seemed to be holding a little icicle. It dripped little by little and I could watch a consistent flow develop over the next day or so. It seemed to signal the melting snow, slowly but surely.

Continue Reading

Snowy Campus

Snow Campus January

It seemed as if the show had pushed most students to stay indoors this Saturday afternoon. As I walked around and took a look at what the sky had left over the night, I was struck by the quiet tranquility of the buildings, the trees and the campus as a whole. The sky was still overcast, so, unfortunately, a fog obscured the Long Island Sound, which I could only imagine would have looked so pretty after the recent snow fall. Either way, the campus still held a gentle beauty in face of all the gray skies.

Continue Reading

Let It Snow!

Let It Snow!

I waited till nightfall to really get the full scale of the recent snow storm. There's something about checking out the snow at night that really enhances the scale and makes the white-crusted landscape that much grander. There's something about the darkness and the inability to discern anything more than just a white expanse, tinted gold by the street lights, that really made me think just how much snow fell upon our little Connecticut Campus.

Continue Reading

Synergy and Snow

Synergy and Snow

"Synergy" by Frances Pratt stands tall and strong in the face of storm Juno, or whatever I've noticed people calling it on Facebook. This photo was taken before the full force of the storm presented itself, with classes not yet cancled and people unsure the full extent of what was to come. The peaceful skies began to grow darker and darker and soon the winds picked up aswell. The storm was coming ... You could just feel it!

Continue Reading