David Jaffe



Contact David Jaffe
Email: djaffe@conncoll.edu
Mailbox: 5363
Office: 301B Palmer Auditorium
Phone: (860) 439-2562
Fax: (860) 439-2595

David Jaffe, Associate Professor of Theater, Theater Department Chair

Associate Professor of Theater
Theater Department Chair

Joined Connecticut College: 2011

Education
B.A., Connecticut College
National Theater Institute, Eugene O'Neill Theater Center
Actors Theater of Louisville Apprentice Company
M.F.A., Yale University School of Drama

Specializations
Actor training
Collectively created performance
Theatrical adaptation
The works of Anton Chekhov

David Jaffe returns to Connecticut College as an associate professor and chair of theater. He is a 1977 alumnus of the College, and was a faculty member in the theater department from 1989-1997.

Jaffe earned his B.A. in theater studies at Connecticut College, then attended the National Theater Institute at the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center and the Actors Theater of Louisville Apprentice Company before earning his M.F.A. in acting at Yale University School of Drama.

During his training he was deeply influenced by his work with Morris Carnovsky, Estelle Parsons, Jon Jory, Earle Gister and Lloyd Richards. As an actor, Jaffe worked in New York City and in regional theaters such as the American Shakespeare Theater at Stratford under the direction of Zoe Caldwell, the Long Wharf Theater, the Yale Repertory Theater and the National Playwrights Conference at the O'Neill Center. He had the honor of narrating the Jerome Robbins' ballet Fanfare with the New York City Ballet for three seasons at the New York State Theater and the Saratoga Performing Arts Center.

During his first appointment at Connecticut College, Jaffe's directorial efforts included Jim Cartwright's ROAD, Howard Korder's Boys' Life, OyamO's The Resurrection of Lady Lester, and Brian Friel's Dancing at Lughnasa. After obtaining permission from Elie Wiesel, Jaffe received support from the Jew Hatred: Paradigm for Racism Symposium for his stage adaptation and direction of Wiesel's first novel Dawn.

Jaffe then served as Director of the O'Neill Center's National Theater Institute for eight years, establishing collaborative relationships with the SITI Company, The Wooster Group, Theater Complicite and The St. Petersburg State Theater Academy. He created the O'Neill Theatermakers Summer Intensive, a six-week program for young actors, directors and playwrights that parallels the O'Neill Center's professional programs. At NTI he taught advanced acting classes, audition technique, improvisation, ensemble process, mentored the directing lab, and directed the NTI Final Project in thirteen of his sixteen semesters. Jaffe led the student companies in adaptations of such material as Homer's Odyssey; Ted Hughes' Tales from Ovid; Clifford Odets' Waiting for Lefty; and with Maria Goyanes, Marjane Satrapi's graphic novel Persepolis. In addition to these adaptations, he led the companies in the collective creation process, developing and performing the original works Civil/War and The Dream Project.

Here in Connecticut, Jaffe has served as stage director for Otello, La Boheme and Le Nozze di Figaro at the Connecticut Lyric Opera and served as Artistic Director of Interpretive Programs & Performance at the Mystic Seaport. He is currently president of the Board of Directors of the Mystic Paper Beasts/Dragon's Egg.

Prior to his return to Connecticut College, Jaffe served as the Frank B. Weeks Visiting Professor of Theater at Wesleyan University where he taught the full arc of acting classes, including Acting I, Improvisation, Acting II and advanced classes in Shakespeare and Heightened Text. He directed Charles Mee's Big Love, Shakespeare's Richard III, as well as The Vanya Project, and a senior thesis production Our Day Will Come, an adaptation of Seamus Heaney's Burial at Thebes, his version of Sophocles' Antigone.

Here at Connecticut College, in the fall of 2012 he directed Four Dead in Ohio: Antigone at Kent State, an adaptation collectively created with a student ensemble. In the spring of 2013 he will offer the sophomore seminar Art of Protest: Occupy_______, as part of the Mellon Undergraduate Research Program.

His courses include American Drama; Acting II; Directing One: Coaching the Actor; and the Advanced Scene Study rotation of Styles, Shakespeare, and The Realists: Chekhov, Ibsen, and O'Neill.

Visit the theater department website.