Yibing Huang



Contact Yibing Huang
Email: yhua@conncoll.edu
Mailbox: 5278
Office: 202 Woodworth House
Phone: (860) 439-2581
Fax: (860) 439-2548

Yibing Huang, Associate Professor of Chinese

Associate Professor of Chinese

Joined Connecticut College: 2000

On sabbatical Spring 2015

Education
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Beijing University
Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles

Specializations
Modern and contemporary Chinese literature, cinema, popular culture
Comparative studies of modernism and postmodernism in China and in the West
Cultural translations between Chinese poetry and modern American poetry

Yibing Huang studied at Beijing University from 1983 to 1993, receiving his B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. in Chinese Literature. During the same decade he also quickly established himself as a poet under the penname "Mai Mang," and was closely associated with a new generation of young poets who were based in Beijing. He moved to the U.S. in 1993 and holds a second Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Professor Huang's research interests cover a broad range, including modern and contemporary Chinese literature, cinema and popular culture, comparative studies of modernism and postmodernism in China and in the West, and cultural translations between Chinese poetry and modern American poetry. He has received research fellowships from the Committee on Scholarly Communication with China, Social Science Research Council and the American Council of Learned Societies.

Professor Huang has an impressive record of publications and conference presentations in both China and the U.S. His book, Contemporary Chinese Literature: From the Cultural Revolution to the Future (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), which is derived from his second dissertation, "From Orphans to Bastards: The Legacy of the Cultural Revolution and Contemporary Chinese Allegories of the Individual," presents case studies of the generation of writers who spent their formative years during the Cultural Revolution and focuses on this generation's identity shift from "new men," "orphans of history" to "cultural bastards."

His other scholarly publications include the following articles: "The Ghost Enters the City: Gu Cheng's Metamorphosis in the 'New World,'" " 'Epic Complex' and the Modernity of Chinese 'New Poetry'," "'Vicious Animals': Wang Shuo and Negotiated Nostalgia for History," "Duoduo: An Impossible Farewell, or, Exile between Revolution and Modernism." He also contributed book reviews in different academic journals and published four author's entries in the Encyclopedia of Contemporary Chinese Culture (Routledge Press, 2005).

In addition to his work in Chinese language and literature, Professor Huang's poetry has been published in China since the 1980s, and is included in many prestigious anthologies, such as The Anthology of Beida Poetry (1978-1998) , The Best Chinese Poetry 1998 , The Annual Anthology of Modern Chinese Poetry 1998 , The Anthology of Major Chinese Poets in the 1990s , and The Best Chinese Poetry 2003 .

His Chinese-English bilingual book of poetry, Stone Turtle: Poems 1987-2000 (Godavaya, 2005), which he translated into English and which was prefaced by the renowned Asian-American writer Russell Leong, has been reviewed in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture and Amerasia Journal . It has been praised as " an important contribution to the still small corpus of contemporary Chinese poetry accessible to readers of English." Another substantial collection of his early poetry, Approaching Blindness [Jiejin mangmu], came out in the fall of 2005 from the Writers Publishing House in Beijing.

Professor Huang has given poetry readings at many different occasions in China and the U.S., including a live radio reading on the Live From Prairie Lights program (Iowa City, October 28, 2005). He and his poetry were also featured in an article "Along L.A. River, Poetic Inspiration," in Los Angeles Times (April 17, 2001).

Chosen as the 2006 Phi Beta Kappa poet of Connecticut College, he delivered his poem, "The Advice Below," which he translated from the original Chinese.

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