Research With Human or Animal Subjects



It is essential that any research involving humans or animals complies with the College's Institutional Review Board Policy. Copies of that policy are available from our office or from members of the Institutional Review Board, whose chair is Ann Sloan Devlin.
The legal requirements to protect human subjects apply to a broad range of research. While most of us understand the need for human subjects to give informed consent when participating in clinical drug trials, we may not realize that data collected through interaction or intervention with individuals are also covered by the federal requirement. Interaction includes interpersonal contact, surveys, and other forms of communication. All research (including interviews, surveys, and questionnaires) involving humans as subjects must be reviewed by the IRB.

Connecticut College complies with the regulations of the Department of Health and Human Services for the protection of human subjects involved in research (45 CFR 46 as amended and published in the Federal Register on June 18, 1991).

According to the Office of Human Subjects Research (OHSR) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), there is a new NIH requirement for education in the protection of human participants, beginning on October 1, 2000. The NIH is part of the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) which is, in turn, an agency within the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). For the complete instructions see the June 5, 2000 NIH Guide Notice, titled "Required Education in the Protection of Human Research Participants" at:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-00-039.html

As indicated in the NIH GUIDE Notice of June 5, 2000, the NIH Intramural Program has developed a computer-based training module on protection of human subjects. This module is accompanied by a set of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's).

It is essential that any research which involves humans or animals be in accordance with the College's Institutional Review Board Policy. Copies of that policy are available from our office or from members of the Institutional Review Board, whose chair is Ann Sloan Devlin.
The legal requirements to protect human subjects apply to a broad range of research. While most of us understand the need for human subjects to give informed consent when participating in clinical drug trials, we may not realize that data collected through interaction or intervention with individuals are also covered by the federal requirement. Interaction includes interpersonal contact, surveys, and other forms of communication. All research (including interviews, surveys, and questionnaires) involving humans as subjects must be reviewed by the IRB.

Connecticut College complies with the regulations of the Department of Health and Human Services for the protection of human subjects involved in research (45 CFR 46 as amended and published in the Federal Register on June 18, 1991).

According to the Office of Human Subjects Research (OHSR) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), there is a new NIH requirement for education in the protection of human participants, beginning on October 1, 2000. The NIH is part of the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) which is, in turn, an agency within the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). For the complete instructions see the June 5, 2000 NIH Guide Notice, titled "Required Education in the Protection of Human Research Participants" at:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-00-039.html

As indicated in the NIH GUIDE Notice of June 5, 2000, the NIH Intramural Program has developed a computer-based training module on protection of human subjects. This module is accompanied by a set of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's).

Frequently Asked Questions:

  • Does the required education apply to research that does not involve human subjects?

    No, but it is important for all investigators, even those working with tissues or specimens derived from human sources to understand the definition for human subjects as defined in 45 CFR part 46.
  • Does the required education apply to grant applications submitted before October 1, 2000 and scheduled to be awarded after that date?

    Yes, it applies to all projects scheduled for funding in FY 2001 or later. The Institute/Center that would be funding the project will request documentation of the required education prior to issuing the award. The information should be submitted in writing and signed by an authorized institutional official.

To view these FAQ's on the NIH website or to send comments concerning this training module, please use the following address:

https://phrp.nihtraining.com/users/login.php

To actually take the training, the address of the on-line training module is:

https://phrp.nihtraining.com/users/login.php

Completion of this Computer-Based Training (CBT) course is an educational requirement for all researchers in NIH's Intramural Research Program (IRP), and other NIH employees who conduct or support research involving human subjects. At Connecticut College please direct your questions to Naima Gherbi, nghe@conncoll.edu860-439-2411.

Contact information:  

Phone:
860-439-2411

Fax:
860-439-5179

Email Naima Gherbi, nghe@conncoll.edu

Office of Corporate, Foundation and Government Relations
Connecticut College
Becker House, 2nd floor
270 Mohegan Avenue
New London, CT 06320-4196