The Connecticut College Arboretum provides a welcome connection with the natural world, offering opportunities for teaching, research, conservation, recreation and public education.

The Arboretum is open to the public seven days a week from dawn to dusk.

waterfowl workshop

Winter Waterfowl

Saturday, February 3, 9 to 11 a.m.

Robert Askins, Katharine Blunt Professor of Biology
Meet and park at the east end of Benham Avenue (Waterford) just before the railroad tracks.
$10 (free members), registration required
The section of the Thames River from Mamacoke Island to Smith Cove is one of the best spots in eastern Connecticut to see wintering waterfowl. The site includes three coves and two salt ponds that provide important habitat for a variety of ducks that spend the winter in Connecticut. Consequently this site, which is a natural area within the Connecticut College Arboretum, has been designated as an Important Bird Area by the National Audubon Society. During winter, the coves support several waterfowl species plus Bald Eagles, Pied-billed Grebes and American Coots. Dress for the weather. Scopes will be provided.

Botany Centennial Celebration: A Connecticut College Legacy

Monday, February 5, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Chad Jones, Professor of Botany and Chair of the Botany Department
Meet in Cummings Arts Center, Oliva Hall.
Free, registration suggested
Join the botany department for this talk, reception and exhibition to kick off a yearlong celebration of its first 100 years.

Tap into Maple Syrup Production

Saturday, February 24, 10 a.m. to noon

Jim Luce, Supervisor of Grounds
Meet in Olin Science Center Lounge.
$10 (free members), registration required
Enjoy time outdoors making one of nature’s sweet treats. Maple syrup starts to run in late winter when temperatures climb above freezing during the day and drop back below freezing at night. Participants will learn how to identify different species of maple trees, install a spile and safely produce syrup.

 

Programs and Activities
Rhododendron pink puff an azalea native to Eastern United States

The Nancy Moss Fine Native Azalea Garden

The Nancy Moss Fine Native Azalea Garden is located in the Native Plant Collection. This garden was established in 1978 with funding from the family as a memorial to Nancy Moss Fine (1929-1965). The Fine Native Azalea Garden includes seventy-nine deciduous Rhododendron shrubs. Fifteen are species and three are selections of natural hybrids. There are a total of eighteen taxa represented. 

The Nancy Moss Fine Native Azalea Garden