October arts and events at Connecticut College

The New York Neo-Futurists.
The New York Neo-Futurists.

October offers opportunities galore for entertainment and education events at Connecticut College. The following are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted:

Oct. 1-17: “Welcome to Hard Times,” an exhibition of works by artist Dave Sinaguglia, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Cummings Arts Center Joanne Toor Cummings Gallery. Sinaguglia explores the autonomous and self-sufficient nature of the crafts person through sculpture, photo and video. For more information, contact Deborah Radachy at darad@conncoll.edu.

Oct. 2: “Hostile Terrain: Taphonomy, Necroviolence, and the Politics of Migrant Death in the Sonoran Desert,” a talk by Jason De Leon, 4:30 p.m., Olin Science Center Room 014. De Leon, an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan, directs the Undocumented Migration Project, a long-term anthropological analysis of clandestine border crossings between Northern Mexico and Southern Arizona. In this presentation, he will discuss how people prepare for crossings, the diverse ways that migrants experience the desert, and what migrant deaths and the post-mortem lives of their corpses can tell us about immigration enforcement and state-crafted violence. Sponsored by the Institute for Field Research and the Department of Anthropology at Connecticut College. For more information, contact Nancy Lewandowski at nancy.lewandowski@conncoll.edu.

Oct. 3: “Trouble on the Edge: Coastal Eutrophication and Salt Marsh Loss,”  a talk by Scott Warren, professor emeritus of botany at Connecticut College , noon, New London Hall Room 101. For more information, contact Liz Smith at liz.smith@conncoll.edu.

Oct. 4: “Value of the Book,” 2-4 p.m., Hood Dining Room in Blaustein Humanities Center. Are you holding on to a rare first edition? A priceless signed book? A highly-sought-after collector’s copy? Ray Rickman will help you find out, with free book evaluations drawing on his many years of experience as a rare-book dealer, a former bookstore owner in Providence, and the former host of the Rhode Island Public Television program “Bestsellers.” For more information, contact Ben Panciera at bpancier@conncoll.edu.

Oct. 4: “A Night Under the Stars - Fall Star Gazing at the Olin Observatory,” 7:30-10 p.m., Olin Science Center. View the moon, globular clusters, the Andromeda galaxy and more through Connecticut College’s telescopes. There will also be a star- and constellation-spotting session for those new to the night sky, indoor hands-on astronomy activities for kids and adults, and several astronomy talks. Rain or shine, cloudy or clear skies. For more information, call Leslie Brown at 860-439-2345.

Oct. 6: “Measurement and Perception of Genuine Self-Enhancement Bias,” a Psychology Department Colloquium Series event presented by Patrick Heck, 4:30 p.m., Bill Hall Room 106. Heck is a graduate student in the Experimental Social Psychology Program at Brown University. For more information, contact Nancy MacLeod at nancy.macleod@conncoll.edu.

Oct. 6: “Using Local Knowledge to Address Global Warming,” 4:30 p.m., Cro’s Nest in the College Center at Crozier-Williams. Experts will explore how five Andean communities use traditional local knowledge to address global warming on highland farms. For more information, contact Jennifer Bonnano at jennifer.bonnano@conncoll.edu.

Oct. 9: “Science and Technology and the Submarine Capitol of the World: 1776-1996,” a talk by Roy Manstan, 7 p.m., 1941 Room in the College Center at Crozier-Williams. Manstan, a former employee of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center in New London, will discuss naval history and the region's role in it, from 1776 to the closing of the Sound Lab in 1996. For more information, contact Ben Panciera at bpancier@conncoll.edu.

Oct. 10: “Prism: An Ensemble Sampler,” 7 p.m., Evans Hall in Cummings Arts Center. The Connecticut College Chamber Choir, Camel Heard, Concert Band, Jazz Band, Traditional Jazz Band, Orchestra, and Percussion and New Music Ensemble present a varied program directed by Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music Gary Buttery, Assistant Professor of Music Wendy Moy and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music Peter Jarvis. Tickets are $5 for general admission, $3 for students and seniors, and free to Connecticut College students, staff and faculty. For more information, contact Terry Wisniewski at terry.wisniewski@conncoll.edu.

Oct. 10-12: “Detroit,” presented by the Department of Theater. What begins as a barbeque between neighbors becomes an explosive revelation of the remnants of “the American Dream” in this play by Lisa D'Amour, directed by Assistant Professor of Theater Ginny Anderson. Offering challenging, psychologically rich characters and compelling and hilarious observations on post-recession America, "Detroit" provides an opportunity for us to engage with theater and culture of today. Performances at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, with matinees on Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m., Hillyer Hall Tansill Theater. Tickets are $12; $6 for military personnel, seniors and students. For tickets, call 860-439-ARTS (2787).

Oct. 11: onStage at Connecticut College presents Khumariyann, 8 p.m., Palmer Auditorium. The Pakistani instrumental quartet wrings a propulsive, furious sound from the lute-like rubab, the zerbaghali (goblet drum), Pushtoon sitar and acoustic guitars. Tickets are $22; $20 for seniors; and $11 for students. For tickets and information call 860-439-2787 or visit onstage.conncoll.edu.

Oct. 13: “The Most Important Psychiatric Discovery in Half a Century: Ketamine and Depression,” a presentation by Frank Menniti, chief scientific officer at Mnemosyne Pharmaceuticals, 4:30 p.m., Bill Hall Room 106. Part of the Fall 2014 Psychology Department Colloquium Series. For more information, contact Nancy MacLeod at nancy.macleod@conncoll.edu.

Oct. 20: “Environmental Justice in Cape Town, South Africa,” 7 p.m., Room 210 of Blaustein Humanities Center. Guest speakers Luzann Isaacs, the conservation manager of Cape Town, and Lief Petersen, the director of the Sustainable Livelihoods Foundation, will discuss topics including efforts to provide decent public housing to poor people and refugees, reducing exposure to unhealthy environments, the balance between social and economic development, and the protection of endangered species. For more information, contact Keleigh Baretincic at kbaretin@conncoll.edu.

Oct. 23-Dec. 5: “high reps/low sets,” an exhibition by Visiting Artist Jessica Tam, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Cummings Arts Center Joanne Toor Cummings Gallery. Tam’s serial paintings and prints explore how repetitions and revisions produce changes, mutations and visual narratives. Using source material from contemporary myths and sensational mass entertainment such as professional wrestling, she takes an image with a history of cliché and repeatedly produces altered versions of that image, creating unfamiliar ways to experience the familiar. Tam will give a talk at 4:15 p.m. on Oct. 23 in Room 308 of Cummings Arts Center. For more information, contact Deborah Radachy at darad@conncoll.edu.

Oct. 24: onStage at Connecticut College presents “The Complete & Condensed Stage Directions of Eugene O’Neill, Vol. 2,” by The New York Neo-Futurists, 7:30 p.m., Palmer Auditorium. The Neo-Futurists take the audience on an adventure into the subconscious of America’s greatest playwright by removing his dialogue and condensing his plays into pure action. Stripping the work of theatrical conventions like plot, setting and character, as well as the separation of audience and performer, allows the commands of Eugene O’Neill’s stage directions to define their roles, actions and relationships. Presented in collaboration with Eugene O’Neill Theater Center’s Eugene O’Neill Celebration. Tickets are $22; $20 for seniors; $11 for students. For tickets and information, call 860-439-2787 or visit onstage.conncoll.edu.

Oct. 28: “Sex Workers Unite: A History of the Movement from Stonewall to SlutWalk,” a talk by Melinda Chateauvert, 4:30 p.m., Room 014 of Olin Science Center. Chateauvert, a historian, activist and author, will discuss how sex workers were trailblazers in struggles for gay liberation, women’s rights, reproductive justice, union organizing and prison abolition. Sponsored by the Connecticut College LGBTQ Resource Center, the Women’s Center and the departments of History and Gender and Women’s Studies. For more information, contact Jen Manion at jmanion@conncoll.edu.

Oct. 30-Nov. 1: Dance Club Fall Performance, 7:30 p.m., Martha Myers Dance Studio in the College Center at Crozier-Williams. The performance features choreography by Connecticut College students. Tickets are $6; $4 for students and seniors. For more information, contact Aimee Couture at aimee.couture@conncoll.edu.

Oct. 31: “John Anthony and Friends: Music for Organ & Brass,” 7:30 p.m., Harkness Chapel. The popular Halloween night concert features Professor of Music John Anthony on organ, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music Gary Buttery on tuba, and Adjunct Instructor of Music Thomas Brown on trumpet. Tickets are $10 for general admission, $5 for students and seniors, and free to Connecticut College students, staff and faculty.



September 29, 2014