War is among the most devastating forces in human history. It can cost communities their people, ecosystems, economies, political structures, ambitions, artistic creations, imaginations, and even their histories. As a result, one of the most vexing problems for nearly all human beings throughout time has been how to maintain peace. The Peace and Conflict Pathway explores both how communities, states, and nations thrive – resolving conflict and developing stable infrastructures for governance, artistic expression, education, health, faith traditions, and environmental and economic sustainability – and also how they can fail in these efforts, leaving conflict unresolved and at times resorting to violence, including war. It also examines the long-term consequences for politics, society, economies, technologies, and cultures of these practices of peace and conflict.

While students will construct their own animating questions, some possible examples might be:

  • How have communities in eras of peace and conflict chosen to tell their stories, in the visual arts, literature, dance, music, religious texts, and other forms of performance and narration? How can students do so today?
  • How have social constructions like race, gender, religion, nationality, and ethnicity bound people together and torn them apart?
  • Are human societies becoming more or less violent?

Core Faculty

Tristan Borer, Professor of Government and International Relations

Tristan Borer

Professor of Government and International Relations, Government and International Relations Department Chair

Tristan Borer’s current research focuses on issues surrounding Western media portrayals of distant human rights abuses, especially those on the African continent. Prior to this, her research focused on human rights in both apartheid and post-apartheid South Africa. Specifically, she has written extensively on the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission and gendered dimensions of transitional justice mechanisms

Ronald Flores, Associate Professor of Sociology

Ronald Flores

Professor of Sociology, Chair of the Sociology Department

Ron Flores teaches Immigration in an Urban Context; Race, Ethnicity and Baseball; Sociology of Families; advanced research seminars on Latinos in America and on Social Inequality; and Introduction to Sociology. He also teaches a first-year seminar on community and civic responsibility, "Our Communities, OurSelves." His courses typically include community service-learning.

Andrea Lanoux, Associate Professor of Slavic Studies, Chair of Slavic Studies Department

Andrea D. Lanoux

Associate Professor of Slavic Studies, Chair of the Slavic Studies Department

Andrea Lanoux teaches Russian language at all levels and courses on Russian literature and culture. She has team-taught courses on gender in communist and post-communist societies (with Amy Dooling), on European Modernism (with Geoffrey Atherton and Abigail Van Slyck), and on comparative Slavic cultures (with Marijan Despalatovic.)

Darryl Phillips, Associate Professor of Classics, Connecticut College

Darryl Phillips

Associate Professor of Classics, Chair of the Classics Department

Darryl Phillips' research and teaching interests have always been interdisciplinary, encompassing history, law, religion, art and architecture, and topography. Though not limited to one approach or one type of evidence, his work is nevertheless united by a common focus — Roman culture and history of the late Republic and early Principate. His approach to the period is to privilege continuity over change while considering cultural practices in their topographical and historical contexts.

Sara Rothenberger

Sara Rothenberger

Assistant Dean for Residential Education and Living

Sara is responsible for overseeing the department and directly supervises the professional staff team. Sara has her bachelor's in psychology from Westminster College, a master's in counseling psychology from the University of Minnesota, and a doctorate in human development with an emphasis in higher education administration.

Catherine M. Stock, Barbara Zaccheo Kohn '72 Professor of History, Director of American Studies Program

Catherine M. Stock

Barbara Zaccheo Kohn '72 Professor of History

Cathy Stock is the author of Rural Radicals: Righteous Indignation in the American Grain (Penguin, 1997). She is also the author of Main Street Crisis: The Great Depression and the Old Middle Class on the Northern Plains, plus the introduction to Dakota Territory, 1861-1889: A Study of Frontier Politics, by Howard Roberts Lamar.

Lawrence Vogel, Professor of Philosophy

Larry Vogel

Professor of Philosophy

Though Larry Vogel teaches “core” courses in the history of philosophy (Ancient, modern, American, and 20th century continental thought) and ethics (both theoretical and applied), he takes special pleasure in creating seminars that build bridges between speculative questions and everyday moral issues, like: Tolerance, Intolerance and the Intolerable; Freedom of the Will and Moral Responsibility; Evil; and Moral Disagreement and Moral Truth.

Thematic Inquiry

A single course will be offered annually by the Pathway coordinator or another member of the Pathway group. The Pathway group will determine a set of shared goals for the Thematic Inquiry, stressing the importance of the interdisciplinary nature of the class and acknowledging that the students may have quite varied interests. Nevertheless, individual instructors will have the flexibility to design a syllabus of their own within that framework. The class will also include three to five appearances, lectures, or conversations with other Pathway faculty to help orient students to the variety of approaches and courses they can take, advisers they can seek, and the community being created. Furthermore, the course would include at least one important “signature” event per year that would bring the entire Pathway group of faculty and students together. This could be a symposium, outside lecturer, or group community service project. From the beginning of the class, students would know that their goal by the term’s end must include an animating question, a plan for creating a global or local connection, and at least initial ideas about a capstone project.

Curricular Itinerary

Mode A: Creative Expression
ARC 342 ARCH DESIGN,II:SELECTED TOPICS
ART 101 CONCEPTS IN TWO DIMENSIONS
ART 102 CONCEPTS IN THREE DIMENSIONS
ART 104 CC:TIME-BASED DIGITAL ART
DAN 119 PERFORMING HIP HOP CULTURE
DAN 162 WEST AFRICAN DANCE
ENG 221 NARRATIVE NONFICTION
ENG 240 READING & WRITING POEMS

Mode B: Critical Inquiry and Analysis
AMS 201D INTRO TO AMERICAN STUDIES
AMS 201S INTRO TO AMERICAN STUDIES
AMS 465 GLOBALZTN & AM CUL SINCE 1945
CLA 204 GREEK TRAGEDY
CLA 222 ANCIENT COMEDY
CLA 303 CLASSICAL EPIC
CLA 314 GRECO-ROMAN HISTORIOGRAPHY
DAN 119 PERFORMING HIP HOP CULTURE
ENG 107 CC:NOMADS, SHAMANS, & MYSTICS
ENG 119 LITERATURE & EVOLUTN OF MIND
ENG 123 INTRO AFRICAN-AMERICAN LIT
ENG 127 SONGS
ENG 137 FICTIONS OF EMPIRE
ENG 155 CC: AMERICAN EARTH
ENG 164 HAPPY END: SHAKESP COMEDIES
ENG 165 SPEAK/FEEL: SHAKESP TRAG/HIST
ENG 212 ICELANDIC SAGAS
ENG 213 BOB DYLAN
ENG 236 THE NOVEL AND APARTHEID
ENG 264 HAPPY END: SHAKESP COMEDIES
ENG 265 SPEAK/FEEL: SHAKESP TRAG/HIST
FYS 1XXX WAR AND PEACE
GER 254 THE HOLOCAUST IN FILM AND LIT
GWS 203 INTRO TO QUEER STUDIES
GWS 306 ADV READ IN FEMINIST THEORY

HIS 115 CC: CHINESE PATH TO HAPPINESS
HIS 128 CC:WORLD WAR I/MAK OF MOD WRLD
HIS 214 POLIT/CUL IN U.S.,1890 TO 1945
HIS 215 POLIT/CULT IN U.S. SINCE 1945
HIS 224 CONFUCIAN TRADITIONS
HIS 262 MODERNIZING CHINA
HIS 278 DAOIST TRADITIONS
PHI 232 TOLERANCE, INTOLER, INTOLERBL
REL 231 RELIGIOUS ETHICS
THE 199 CC:AIDS EPIDEMIC THEATER/FILM

Mode C: Quantitative and Formal Reasoning
ES 312 VECTOR-BASED GEOG INFO SYST
ES 313 RASTER-BASED GEOG INFO SYST
MAT 107 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS
MAT 110 CC: NETWORKS & THEIR APPLCTNS

Mode D: Scientific Inquiry and Analysis
ES 120 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY
ES 211 WEATHER/CLIMATE:PAST,PRES,FUTR
ES 315 RIVER ENVIRONMENTS
PHY 113 ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Mode E: Social and Historical Inquiry

AHI 103 CC: BUILDING CULTURE
AHI 105 CC: MONA LISA TO INSTAGRAM
AHI 246 NINETEENTH-CENTURY ART
AHI 260 EARLY TWENTIETH-CENTURY ART
AHI 261 LATE 20TH C ART
AHI 277 20TH C ARCHITECTURE/DESIGN
AHI 361 ENVIRONMNTL ART & ITS ETHICS
AMS 201D INTRO TO AMERICAN STUDIES
AMS 201S INTRO TO AMERICAN STUDIES
ANT 104 QUESTIONING CUL:INTRO TO ANTH
ANT 114 CC: POWER AND INEQUALITY
CLA 101 CC: ANCIENT GREECE
CLA 102 CC:THE ROMAN WORLD
CLA 216 WARFARE IN GRECO-ROMAN ANTIQ

Mode E: Social and Historical Inquiry (continued)
CLA 336 ROMAN POLITICAL CULTURE
ECO 201 FEMINIST ECONOMICS
ECO 219 WAGES, INCOME, AND INEQUALITY
ECO 227 ECONOMICS AND MORALITY
ECO 237 ECON GROWTH/DEVEL IN LAT AMER
ECO 250 ECONOMIC JUSTICE
GOV 111 U.S. GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

GOV 112 COMPARATIVE POLITICS
GOV 113 INTERNATIONAL POLITICS
GWS 103 SEX/CULTRE/POWER:INTRO TO GWS
GWS 203 INTRO TO QUEER STUDIES
GWS 207 (DIS)EMBODIED STRUGGLE
GWS 224 TRANSNATNL WOMEN’S MOVEMNTS
HIS 115 CC: CHINESE PATH TO HAPPINESS
HIS 120 CC: THE AMERICAN WEST
HIS 128 CC:WORLD WAR I/MAK OF MOD WRLD
HIS 202 EMPIRE/EXPAN E ASIA,1840-1950s
HIS 203 COLONIAL HIST OF NORTH AM
HIS 204 AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY ERA
HIS 214 POLIT/CUL IN U.S.,1890 TO 1945
HIS 215 POLIT/CULT IN U.S. SINCE 1945
HIS 222 WORLD WAR II & POST-WAR JAPAN
HIS 224 CONFUCIAN TRADITIONS
HIS 243 DIFFCLT PAST:GER HIS,1850-2000
HIS 262 MODERNIZING CHINA
HIS 278 DAOIST TRADITIONS
HIS 306 GLOBALIZATION OF URBAN POVERTY
MUS 229 ETHNOMUSICOLOGY:SOC SCI OF MUS
PHI 232 TOLERANCE, INTOLER, INTOLERBL
REL 165 REL CONFLICT, PEACE & FRNDSHP
REL 231 RELIGIOUS ETHICS
SOC 103 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
SOC 424 GENOCIDE/RESISTANCE:NATV AMER

Courses Not Currently Designated with a Mode of Inquiry
AMS 201K INTRO TO AMERICAN STUDIES
ANT 220 LANGUAGE DEATH/REVITALIZATION
ANT 232 SECURITY,TRAFFICKING,VIOLENCE
ANT 234 INDIGENOUS CULTR OF S AMERICA
ANT 431 GLOBALIZATION/TRANSBORDERISM
BOT 117 INTRO TO ETHNOBOTANY
CHEM XXXX THE SCIENCE OF TERRORISM [USCGA]
ECO 318 ECO OF GLOBAL FOODS & AG SYSTM
ES 210 HYDROLOGY
ES 493D GEOLOGIC HAZARDS & HUMANS
ES 494D GEOLOGIC HAZARDS & HUMANS
FYS 1XXX PLAGUES AND BIOTERRORISM
FYS 1XXX BIOLOGY IN THE POPULAR MEDIA
FYS 1XXX GANDHI AND HIS CRITICS
FYS 1XXX SOCIAL HISTORY OF WARFARE IN EUROPE
GOV 263 INT’L POLITICS OF CLIMATE CHNG
GOV 307 THE POLITICS OF REFUGEES
GOV 323 HUMAN RIGHTS AND MEDIA
GOV 324 HUMAN RIGHTS IN WORLD POL
GOV 493Q WOMEN AND WORLD POLITICS
GOV 494Q WOMEN AND WORLD POLITICS
GWS 223 GEN/SEXLTY/RACE IN CARIBB CULT
GWS 354 BLACK FEMINISMS
HIS 206 CIVIL WAR & RECONSTRUCTION
HIS 208 THE VIKINGS
HIS 234 MODERN EUROPE, 1790s-1990s
HIS 322 LEGACY OF WW II “POST-WAR” JPN
HIS 428 DEBATING CHINA’S GLOBALIZATION
HIS 458 CIV RIGHTS IN NORTH, 1925-1975
MUS 108 MUSIC OF THE WORLD
REL 101 INTRO TO RELIGION: GLOBAL REL
REL 248 HOLOCAUST/POST-HOL RESPONSES
SOC 203 IMMIGRATION IN URBAN CONTEXT
SOC 324 GENDER, CULTURE, AND THE BODY
SOC 325 FOUND/DEVELOP SOC THEORY
SOC 364 URBAN PROBLEMS
SOC 400 THE SOCIOLOGY OF GLOBALIZATION

Suggested Global-Local Engagement

We foresee a wide variety of ways in which students in the Pathway will experience Global/Local Engagement. Many SATA and study abroad programs already in place are located in communities that have been sites of important, even historic, conflict resolution and/or violence. Our programs in Cuba and Vietnam are two that would work well for students on the Pathway, as would the SIT program in South Africa and New Zealand, and the Cold War Studies program in St. Petersburg, among many others. Likewise, we look forward to working within the new institutional collaborations in Chiapas, Mexico, South Korea, Istanbul, and Ghana. Many national organizations devote their work to and provide opportunities for internships in peace and conflict studies. Examples of these include the Interfaith Youth Core in Chicago, and the Carter and King Centers in Atlanta. The highly regarded programs in Peace and Conflict Studies at Swarthmore College and George Washington University, and others, would provide resources for curricular design or collaborative pedagogy.

In the local community, we hope to collaborate with the Coast Guard Academy to increase opportunities for service learning with veterans’ organizations and military museums and memorials. We look to further foster ties for discussion and reconciliation with the Mohegan and Eastern Pequot nations.  Programs established through Community Partnerships in New London, including the Centro de la Comunidad and the Homeless Hospitality Center, are also natural fits for the mission and goals of the Pathway, among others.

 

For more information, please contact Catherine Stock or any other member of the core faculty.